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The long cut

The long cut

Old 09-25-2007, 02:57 AM
  #21  
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When I plan a seamless border, I use a 3 yard length of fabric. I open it, and hold the fabric by one selvage edge. Then I begin to fold, lining up the selvage edges. I do trim the selvage edges when I get it all lined up. If you fold it into 4 layers, you will need to use a 24 inch rulrer and a small 12 in ruler, or you can slide the ruler carefully to extend the cutting edge to the remaining few inches. But with the measurement you need to cut, this should work very well for you.

If you plan to cut the border at the beginning of your project, the remainder of the fabric can be used in other parts of the quilt. A seamless border looks so nice.

I would never rip fabric when we have mats and rotary cutters to do the job. Ripping stretches the fabric. Sure, long ago women ripped their fabric, but why add an extra step (steaming it back into shape) when you can do it just as easily this way?

June in Cincinnati

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Old 09-25-2007, 08:57 AM
  #22  
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When I went to New Orleans to visit a couple of weeks ago, the first thing my sister and I did after leaving the airport was to go to a qult shop on Magazine street. They rip everything that you purchase! Measure, snip and rip. That is the only way that I can get a straight piece. On occaision I have found that the grain doesn't run true, but not usually on the pricier pieces. So don't feel bad about ripping, even quilt shops do it.
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Old 09-25-2007, 09:31 AM
  #23  
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Well, it worked this time and I liked the technique. I didn't really notice any stretching June other than the first inch or so. I was tearing long rips at a time and not starting and stopping. It only took about 3 or 4 tugs to get through the three yards and I trimmed the first couple inches from the project anyway. I love the rotary, but sure like this method too. :D
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Old 09-25-2007, 09:01 PM
  #24  
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From what I understand about the way fabric is woven, to rip it from selvage edge to selvage edge does not stretch it as much as ripping the selvage edge longways. I have cut fabric "longways" to avoid seams in making valences and they began sagging (not a pretty sight, believe me). I usually fold it so I can cut 4 layers at one time.
When I sew a long seam such as a border, I always pin (which I know is not a popular technique among many quilters). I like the flower head type for all types of sewing.

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Old 09-25-2007, 09:46 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Steve
Having worked on only small pieces thus far, this is my first time cutting a large length of fabric; I need two - 68 x 3 Ĺ inches long for the border of a table runner, plus the accompanying backing. Iíve a three-yard length of fabric and want to cut it parallel to the selvage, but how do I accurately cut a piece this large? The thought of quickly messing up this much fabric with my rotary is giving me the willies. Can anyone guide me in this
process?
Why?

Do you suffer from Anglejointinmiddleofborderphobia?

Make life simple. cut along the width and piece it together.

tim in san jose
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Old 09-26-2007, 04:40 AM
  #26  
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Most of the time I do what Tim suggests. There are just a few exceptions -usually if the border is a solid fabric where a seam would be apparent or if the fabric is directional or has motifs that would clearly show a seam unless I matched it like wallpaper (even then I usually just match it like wallpaper! :wink: )

If your fabric is a non-directional print, seams will usually be hidden. The small difference in fabric flexibility is not likely to be a factor if you cut and sew carefully.

Often I will use a diagonal seam when joining border pieces. I can't remember why... I probably had a teacher tell me to do that or read it in a book or something...
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Old 09-26-2007, 05:35 AM
  #27  
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I like the look of a solid border. The lengthwise cut will not stretch anymore than the other way. The secret is in matching points on the quilt with points on the border and pinning carefully. Using the walking foot is also helpful in keeping everything lined up correctly. If piecing is necessary seaming on the bias--laying 2 pieces at right angles to each other and sewing on the diagonal--makes the seam much less noticeable and spreads the thickness around more evenly. The same holds true for he binding. i have trouble cutting straight and accuraely so I tear my fabric and if it is dark do it a little wide just in case the "white fringes shows. That way it can be incorporated into the seam and trimmed after the fact if necessary. I figure it will be pressed eventually so its no more trouble to pess it after it is cut than before. The nice thing is that there is no quilt police so it is all down to whatever works for the individual. Now I will get off my soap box and get back to work! LOL
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Old 09-26-2007, 05:49 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Steve
I love the rotary, but sure like this method too. :D
Having started out with the ripping method, I have to add - this is a great tension reducer and you can't beat the sound for a sense of empowerment.
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Old 09-26-2007, 07:45 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by k_jupiter
Originally Posted by Steve
Having worked on only small pieces thus far, this is my first time cutting a large length of fabric; I need two - 68 x 3 Ĺ inches long for the border of a table runner, plus the accompanying backing. Iíve a three-yard length of fabric and want to cut it parallel to the selvage, but how do I accurately cut a piece this large? The thought of quickly messing up this much fabric with my rotary is giving me the willies. Can anyone guide me in this
process?
Why?

Do you suffer from Anglejointinmiddleofborderphobia?

Make life simple. cut along the width and piece it together.

tim in san jose
No tim, just prefer to have the length if I've got it available. :D
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Old 09-26-2007, 07:59 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by k_jupiter

Do you suffer from Anglejointinmiddleofborderphobia?

tim in san jose
ROTFLMBO!!!!!! :lol: :lol: Now I know what my problem is called!!
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