Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Machine Quilting >

Machine Quilting

Machine Quilting

Old 03-15-2009, 11:44 AM
  #1  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 30
Default

[size=24][size=18] :?: Quilterbee,Pa.
I would like to do MachineQuilting But need to know what kind of feet i need for a Queen size Quilt And how you keep it together could any one help me Quilterbee.
Quilterbee is offline  
Old 03-15-2009, 12:15 PM
  #2  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Alturas, CA
Posts: 9,001
Default

Are you going to "stitch in the ditch"? Then I highly recommend a walking foot. If you're going to free motion, then you need a free motion foot, I think also known as an embroidery foot. As far as keeping the sandwich together, some people like to pin with a "quilting safety pin", some like to baste, some people spray a basting spray like 505, some people tack on their machines. It's all in what your comfort level is. Hope this helps.
pocoellie is offline  
Old 03-15-2009, 01:51 PM
  #3  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 30
Default

Thanks a lot Quilterbee.
Quilterbee is offline  
Old 03-15-2009, 05:13 PM
  #4  
Super Member
 
Shemjo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 6,885
Default

Welcome from St. Louis.
Shemjo is offline  
Old 03-18-2009, 04:48 PM
  #5  
Super Member
 
Marcia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 5,552
Default

Hi and welcome from Georgia
Marcia is offline  
Old 03-18-2009, 08:10 PM
  #6  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 30
Default

:) If any body has any more ideas for me please post them.
Thanks a lot Quilterbee
Quilterbee is offline  
Old 03-18-2009, 08:48 PM
  #7  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western Wisconsin
Posts: 12,930
Default

A walking foot helps with straight-line machine quilting, and can even be used for gentle meandering curves or large half-circles.

For free motion quilting, you typically use a darning foot (and drop the feed dogs, or cover them if your machine doesn't have a drop option). The darning foot hops up and down with each stitch, allowing you to freely move the quilt sandwich around. Free motion quilting usually takes quite awhile to master, as it takes skill to achieve even stitches.

My favorite way of holding the quilt layers together is with spray basting. If you do a search on this forum, you should find several recent threads on this. Spray basting works best with cotton batting. 505 seems to be the favorite spray basting brand here, both for holding the layers securely and for lack of odor. Spray basting is basically repositionable glue that you spray between the layers to hold together -- sort of like a huge post-it note!

I like to heavily starch my backing fabric before layering. This helps stabilize the backing so I don't end up with puckers and tucks later. A search on "starch" or "starching" should turn up some recent threads on that topic too.

If you are new to machine quilting, I would recommend a cotton batting (I like the traditional 100% cotton Blue Ribbon batting, or an 80/20 batt). They are less slippery than polyester and thinner, which makes manipulating the sandwich under the presser foot easier. If you don't mind a slightly stiffer drape, Warm and Natural is an excellent cotton batting to use for machine quilting. Warm and Natural requires less quilting than other cotton batts (lines can be up to 6 or 7 inches apart, whereas traditional cotton is best at 2 or 3 inches max).

If you opt for a walking foot and feed dogs up, the easiest pattern would be straight or meandering lines that run from one end of the quilt to the other. You do not want to have to turn a queen size quilt around under the presser foot!

Meandering would be a very easy and casual pattern to do. I don't know how to describe it, except you would start at one end and gently curve one way and then another as you sew down the quilt. Succeeding lines could echo the first one, or you could allow yourself to meander in different directions and intersect previous lines. You could turn the quilt sideways and make meandering crosshatching lines too, so you have lines going both top-to-bottom and side-to-side.

The walking foot with feed dogs up would ensure that your stitchese are smooth and even. Be sure to create a test sandwich first to practice on. Usually you want to lengthen your stitch somewhat to allow for the thickness of the quilt.
Prism99 is offline  
Old 03-19-2009, 09:02 AM
  #8  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 30
Default

Prim99,

Thanks a lot for your ifor on machine Quilting I will try that I have never done Machine Quilting But i Will Practice First. QuilterBee
Quilterbee is offline  
Old 03-19-2009, 01:17 PM
  #9  
Power Poster
 
littlehud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: SW Iowa
Posts: 32,856
Default

I have to agree. A quilting foot is great for free motion quilting and a walking foot is a must for stitch in the ditch. Basting spray gets my vote over pinning or basting.
littlehud is offline  
Old 03-19-2009, 01:41 PM
  #10  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 30
Default

Thanks Ladies I really appreciate the help Quilterbee
Quilterbee is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.