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Thread: Machine Snobbery?

  1. #26
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    Don't listen to her I have bought all my machines in stores or online, I only purchased my expensive one from a dealer, all are mass produced anyways for many dealers and shops , like the other board member said she was just mad you didn't buy from her, trying to guilt trip you and make you feel like you bought an inferior machine. I would take the class somewhere else as well because that is poor customer service.

  2. #27
    Senior Member fixfido's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Val in IN View Post
    My opinion? Use what you have and can afford. Beautiful quilts don't know what kind of machines they were made with and they don't care. Neither should we.
    Couldn't agree more!! Some of the most proficient quilters in the world use vintage machines with no bells and whistles. It's NOT about the equipment.....it's about the talent and creativity of the user!!!
    Life has given me so much more than scraps, but I make quilts anyway!
    http://www.wickedcool.etsy.com

  3. #28
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    Our Brother dealer cannot give free classes to those who buy the mass-market, rather than the dealer line. They can't afford it.

    It isn't that they look down upon the mass market machines (there are a few of the project runway machines that overlap between the mass market/dealer lines and they recommended I just buy that on amazon) it is that the dealer support is built into the price of the machine.

    Our brother dealer offers a $200 package where they offer lifetime classes for a mass market machine, as well as the basic cleaning that would come with a dealer purchased machine.

    It isn't snobbery, it is business. $50 sounds reasonable for most classes, IMO.
    I don't think paying $50 for a class was her point...she paid the money to take the class, and then was singled out as having an inferior machine in front of the class...and THAT is not good business, and it'd be a cold day you know where before I EVER spent another dime with that dealer.
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  4. #29
    Super Member 0tis's Avatar
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    I ran into this years ago -I was young and didn't really know how to sew - I asked at a Bernina dealer about learning some basics - boy you would have thought I was dropped in the sewer before I went in - they did not want to talk unless I purchased a Bernina - needless to say I never returned and I have been a little prejudiced against Bernina since then. Sorry that you were not treated well - at least you have some $$$ to afford more fabric. Woo Hoo...

  5. #30
    Super Member suebee's Avatar
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    I concur! She was charged more money for her class because she didnt have one of their machines??? that would be the last time I shopped there!!
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkiris View Post
    Our local quilt store is a Viking dealer, and their classes favor those with high $$ machines. I can understand that classes are needed to learn to use all the options on high end machines. But machine snobbery?? Shame on them!!
    SUEB

  6. #31
    Senior Member chickadee_42us's Avatar
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    Don't allow that attitude to make you feel less with your new machine. You paid for the class, enjoy it and learn from it. The negative is her issue not yours.
    Keep smiling at her, the very least she'll think you goofey too!
    Enjoy the day, Chickadee_42us

  7. #32
    Senior Member chickadee_42us's Avatar
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    Oh and yeah, I do believe there are machine snobs everywhere.
    Enjoy the day, Chickadee_42us

  8. #33
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    I am thrilled for you to get a new machine. I don't think they should single you out after you paid for the class. That is unkind. Best to you.
    DonnaR
    Grammy to Isaiah and Ruth

  9. #34
    Senior Member sherian's Avatar
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    so sorry to hear about the extra for classes with out there machine. I have been to 3 Quilt places for classes.
    People come with all kinds of sewing or sewing ebroidery machines. They have been very good about that, one shop
    even carries your machines in and out for you. They do not pushed to by material, or things. They do make you get a book or patten or made up kit for class. All brands, Adventure Quilts, Jo Jo's Quilts, are great places here. They even have some free classes and sew for a cause, dogs, children's hospital, cancer, etc. There is one quilt place I will
    not mention but they are as you say, you need to buy everything here. It is well known about them, and I have heard
    some stories. Just keep looking there are better places or make a group with friends., wishing you good luck.

  10. #35
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    If she was a smart dealer, she would welcome you, take the $50 that you are willing to pay for the class, and hope to keep you as a happy customer who, someday in the future, may purchase a machine from HER next time!

  11. #36
    Super Member sewNso's Avatar
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    enjoy and luv the machine you chose. start of with eleanor burns, imo, and read everything on this board, and you'll get there. it's important to be able to afford you hobbie.

  12. #37
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I forgot to add, I have that exact same machine and it is a little workhorse. My husband bought it reconditioned online, and I have never EVER been unhappy with it! I used it daily for at least 5-6 years before I bought a larger straight-stitch machine with a 9" harp. I still use that little Brother for lots of things including retreats, special stitches that my big machine doesn't do, and embroidery.

    You will not be sorry you picked that machine.

  13. #38
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    If she was a smart dealer, she would welcome you, take the $50 that you are willing to pay for the class, and hope to keep you as a happy customer who, someday in the future, may purchase a machine from HER next time!

    Great point!
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome Decor 3050 / Janome 1100D serger
    Singer Centennial model (inherited from my late, fav aunt!)

  14. #39
    Super Member Country1's Avatar
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    I was trilled when a couple of yrs ago when my DH bought me a Brother Project Runway. He research and found it to be a machine with very good reviews and was $500+ (which I consider expensive) It does all the embroidery I need to do, I use it on quilting projects and clothing items also. I proudly take it to classes and have NEVER had anyone say a word about it. Of course, this LQS is in a small town a county over and I've seen all kinds of machines there. And a wonderful shop owner and employees that treat everyone the same!...
    In the future if you have a Ag Extention office or adult ed classes, check into them, they are often cheaper and your everyday type of people there.
    To be honest, I am glad I wasn't at your class because my mouth might have ran faster than my machine was! lol
    I also would have let her know that she just lost my business and my friends as well.
    Country 1

  15. #40
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
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    My LQS is a Pfaff dealer and repair person, I use a 12 yr old Janome, my friend has a Kenmore from the late 50's we have both taken several diffrent classes from them Have never had a bad experence there. I have seen Singers, Brothers, Berninas, you name it I have seen it in her shop for classes. If we have a problem with our machines she or her DH will walk us through it untill the problem is found, they have explained about there contract and not being able to actually work on the machine. They do have a refrence list posted in the class room with numbers and who to ask for when we need help with a machine that is not there brand. The are the only sewing machine repair people in the area but they can point us in the right direction. I do know she will give classes on Pfaff's that were not purchased in her shop one of her customers baught a Pfaff is AZ last winter came here for the summer and shop owner gave her lessons on it. Of coures this is a really small town so everyone knows what everyone is doing! LOL

  16. #41
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I have run into my share of machine snobs over the years . One LQS always .. always asked either while you were shopping or at the cutting counter "So , what kind of machine do you have?". If the answer was anything other than the brand they sold ... it was like they had all they could do to just cut your fabric ... like it became the biggest chore ! I hated going into that LQS and did just about anything to avoid it. A few years ago they went out of business.
    A good business person recognizes that good customers don't always look like what you expect. And since the perchase was already made , what was to gain in her behavior?
    In treating you that way would you ever buy anything from her in the future( like when it comes time to upgrade)? She had the opportunity to start a relationship, and earn your loyalty and failed to see it as such.
    Last edited by Lori S; 01-24-2012 at 08:01 PM.

  17. #42
    Junior Member Baby Catcher's Avatar
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    I took a class at a LQS and the owner insulted my Singer feather weight. Gasp! Who insults a FW?

  18. #43
    Senior Member lonestardreams's Avatar
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    How tacky. I guess the rules are different for dealers. The dealer where I shop sells Bernina, Brother and Janome. They service all brands and are very helpful. I have seen the owner help people with so many different machines.

    It's my money, I'll buy what I want.

    Enjoy your machine and have fun.

  19. #44
    Senior Member Highmtn's Avatar
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    Elliegirl...
    I waited years and years to buy a super n-i-c-e digital sewing machine with moderate bells and whistles, but even when I thought about taking the plunge the Bernina dealer was very cautious NOT to shove me into something that was more then I needed or wanted. Also, I bought local because I had been buying fabric from this quilting store for a long time and I wanted to support her business (she was super nice).

    Another friend of mine was very tight on funds, and she got a super nice Janome off of Overstock.com for $100.00 (refurbished). She has sewn up a storm with that little gem.

    To this day.. I keep my original 1977 Kenmore sewing machine proudly in reach. I get it serviced and I still love it after allll these years! It's a little work horse, and I don't pay any attention to ANY ONE pulling the "brand snobbery" snub if I happen to take it to a class.

    A shop owner that's haughty or rude runs off good shoppers. I wouldn't spend my money anywhere that had that type of atmosphere. Tooo many good appreciative FUN quilt shops around.
    .
    "It's a *fine line* between HOBBY and MENTAL ILLNESS"~ Dave Barry

  20. #45
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    First of all, it's hard to accept or feel bad about snobbery based on 'mass production,' when what she really meant was 'mass distributed'...because, of course, you are absolutely correct, all sewing machines are mass produced. Their price depends as much on the fact that the chain stores sell thousands of machines every day (maybe a week) where the store will sell one a month. How many people were in your class? Ask them when they bought their machines... they don't run the classes till they have enough people to make up a decent sized class.

    There are lovely features on EVERY BRAND of machine out there and I'm assuming that you bought the one you liked and wanted and that had the features you needed. Enjoy your new machine, we are looking forward to seeing some of your new projects.....

  21. #46
    Junior Member Taino Jan's Avatar
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    Yep. I ran into the snob factor regarding my inexpensive Brothers machine. I now have a Janome (lower end) but got it because it is a great machine, well made, that does what I want. Ignore the snobs and wanna-be's.

    Great quilts have been made on treadle machines as well as high end computerized models. And guess which ones will still work if the electricity goes out.
    Rules of Life:1-Don't take anything personally 2-Integrity of words and deeds 3-Don't make assumptions 4-Do your best

  22. #47
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    So sorry you had that experience. Shame on her for trying to make you feel bad in front of a class! How small of her, and not at all business smart! People like that end up going out of business. Try to shake it off, enjoy your new machine, and if it were me, I'd certainly shop and take classes elsewhere in the future. Who needs attitude? Thankfully, most shop owners and dealers are smarter and much nicer than her. The ladies at our local quilt shop are exceptionally sweet. Your experience makes me appreciate them all the more! Have fun with your machine! You have gotten lots of good advice here--it's the skill of the operator, not the machine. Gorgeous quilts have long been made without any machine at all!

  23. #48
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baby Catcher View Post
    I took a class at a LQS and the owner insulted my Singer feather weight. Gasp! Who insults a FW?
    a total clod

  24. #49
    Super Member Vanogay's Avatar
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    I agree with most everyone who's posted. Snobbery in a small business against customers not owning/buying/using exactly the brand they are contracted to sell only drives business away. I too, have a Brother, but a Disney and love the work it does. Got it from the dealer when someone traded it in for a larger and newer machine. Price was good and that's what counted with me. Mine's too heavy for me to carry to classes, so it's a stay-at-home, but I love it. And remember - it's been said here - it's not the machine but the skill of the operator that makes the great quilt!! Don't know how many other quilt shops you have in your part of KY, but I'd certainly make a road trip for my next fabric purchase. (Come south to us in Tennessee - we have some nice shops)
    Kathleen

    Live today as if it may be your last, for who knows...

  25. #50
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
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    Great quilts have been made on treadle machines as well as high end computerized models. And guess which ones will still work if the electricity goes out.[/QUOTE]

    when not if.....no one is safe LOL

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