Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Machine transport question

  1. #1
    Member azure68's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    27

    Machine transport question

    I started sewing a year ago and have pretty much self taught myself on all the projects I've made. I'm taking my first class at a local quilt shop in a couple of days and was wondering what's the best way of transporting my machine. I will be taking my Juki HZL-F600 for the class and already have a Tutto large tote with the wheels for it. The shop is about a 25 minute drive from where I live. When I purchased the bag, I was able to stand it up with the wheels down in the trunk of my car and can still close the trunk with no issues.

    I just loaded my machine with the hardcover on into the tote and it fits with barely any wiggle room. Now, since the tote doesn't have any brakes on the wheels, do I have to worry about the tote moving and tipping over when I take the corners? I don't plan on turning fast on corners, but you never know. lol

    Can I lay the tote on its side in the trunk? Would that be bad for the machine to be stored in that position during transport? We don't have the best roads here in town, so the occasional bump is a regular occurence. Or am I better off laying some towels on the back seat and securing the tote upright with the seatbelt instead?

    Thanks,
    Peggy

  2. #2
    Super Member clsurz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    1,504
    Make sure your needle is down for one thing.

    Does your tote have straps in it? If so use those. I also put old towels in the tote where ever I can squeeze them in. That also will help to stablize the machine.

    I don't recommend laying it sideways. IMHO it should be upright.
    cparant

  3. #3
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    34,902
    I have a rolling luggage case that I put my machine in for travel. I put in on the back seat of my car and buckle it in like a person. Can you do that with yours or is it too big.

  4. #4
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    England Alton Towers
    Posts
    6,640
    Blog Entries
    1
    I try to fit my machine and bag between the front and back seats on the floor. Put needle down and foot down and plenty of padding around machine. If it has to go in the trunk, boot, then at right angles to way you mentioned ie sides of bag pointing to front and back. Then use suitcase to hold tight I have also used bungy ties to hook on handles. You don't need bad roads emergency stop recently put the handle of my bernina under the top cover.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  5. #5
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,971
    Blog Entries
    8
    Why dont you leave the hard cover off. The Tutto will protect the machine

  6. #6
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    1,821
    I always use a seatbelt to secure the machine. Not only do I want to protect the machine in case of sudden stops or turns, if I was ever in a more serious accident, the moving projectile of a heavy sewing machine could be a killer. People don't always think about the fact that all the stuff in your car becomes mobile in an accident.

  7. #7
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Fox Valley Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,932
    I put my machine on the floor of the back seat, and then move my front seat back as far as it will go to secure the machine. I would be leary of having it in the trunk of the car. I haven't tried belting my sewing machine in, and feel like it is very snuggly in place behind the seat. I have to move the seat forward before I can get the machine out it is in there that tight.

  8. #8
    Member azure68's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    27
    Thanks for the suggestions!

    Needle and foot down? Ok, I'll remember that. The Tutto is 21" in length, since it's the large one. I'll see if I can fit it behind the front seat. If it doesn't or it's too wide for the footwell, I'll strap onto the backseat. I do really like how the Tutto is constructed and it turns so easily. I found a pink one at the LQS, it was expensive, but it's worth it. I wasn't going to get the embroidery module bag, but since they wanted to get rid of it, they gave me a 40% discount on it. I figure I can use it to put my projects in there. If I end up taking classes on a regular basis, I'll be shopping for a 3/4 size machine, as the Juki I'm using this time around is 21 lbs and a little cumbersome to take out and put away.

  9. #9
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    England Alton Towers
    Posts
    6,640
    Blog Entries
    1
    After my accident I would definitely keep the hard cover on. My machine was in the janome sewing machine trolley with plenty of packing etc. it was the handle metal that hit the handle on the machine and sent it under the top part of machine. It is a bernina 400q. In the back as packing was all the fabric I was making a quilt with plus a quilt on top. .
    Finished is better than a UFO

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    4,957
    I drive a small pickup so end up having my machine in the front passenger seat - it is strapped in with the seat belt. I don't use a wheeled tote as it won't fit in my pickup. I don't have a sidewalk and rolling it on the ground is very difficult.

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Rockford, ND
    Posts
    1,864
    i have always belted my machine on the seat like a person

  12. #12
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,658
    Blog Entries
    2
    A Janome Jem lives in the trunk of my car for sewdays and classes. It's in a rolling tote and I set the tote in a laundry basket. There is room for a tote bag of sewing notions, extension cord and my iron bucket. It all fits in the laundry basket. I don't have to pack anything when it's time to go sew except my fabric. The laundry basket keeps everything upright and in place.
    Got fabric?

  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Deep South near Cajun Country, USA
    Posts
    3,841
    A box would have the same effect as the laundry basket. An option I use is to take towels or blankets or utility quilts & stuff on either side of the wheels on the Tutto. That usually stops the rolling. I wouldn't even think about turning it over on it's side. Most of the machines these days are computerized & I just don't believe they want to be turned every which way. Of course, I could be wrong, but I would make every attempt to keep it vertical, even if you have to take it out of the Tutto & just sit it in the trunk.
    Sew a Little, Love a Lot & Live like you were dying!

  14. #14
    Member azure68's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    27
    Great ideas and input! I went and got one of those Rubbermaid storage bins to set the Tutto in. I wasn't really sure if computerized machines were meant to be laying on the side either. I always thought it'd be best to keep them upright. I saw a blog where someone was reviewing her Tutto with her computerized sewing machine in there and it was laying on its side in the trunk, which made me start to second guess myself.

    If it turns out classes are a regular thing for me, I may just consider looking for a class sized machine. Something more lighter and compact.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.