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Thread: Making a Colour Wheel

  1. #1
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    Making a Colour Wheel

    A hardware store nearby is going out of business and I asked if I could take some of the paint chips from the paint department, that they are going to throw out. I thought I could make my own colourwheel.

    Does anyone know of a site or YouTube video that explains how to do this or has anyone done this themselves?

    Watson

  2. #2
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    Some of the brands have a small hole in them already. If not, punch a hole in the ones you want to use. I keep my sample chips for my projects on a notebook ring. They are like key rings but open and close. They are easy to find at the office supply store.

    You might even ask for a fan deck too.

  3. #3
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    Thanks, Rhonda...
    I am wondering how I choose which colours to take to make a colour wheel with?

    I've tried to look it up, but no one actually tells you which colours to choose, just how to arrange the ones you have.

    Watson

  4. #4
    Super Member SuziSew's Avatar
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    I googled color wheel and there were a lot of examples. Here are 3 sites that seem to give color theory explanations maybe one of them will help.

    https://www.bhg.com/decorating/color...l-color-chart/
    http://www.house-design-coffee.com/c...eel-chart.html
    https://lifehacker.com/learn-the-bas...goo-1608972072
    Sue

  5. #5
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Watson View Post
    Thanks, Rhonda...
    I am wondering how I choose which colours to take to make a colour wheel with?

    I've tried to look it up, but no one actually tells you which colours to choose, just how to arrange the ones you have.

    Watson
    If you have a really sharp eye re colour you could do it.
    However, for me, the problem would be "seeing" what colour things are.
    You know how there are a 1000 shades of white ... pure, snow, blue undertone, etc.
    And all the other colours that pick up different hues ...........


    I agree with the suggestion ... go for a whole fan deck, for the best use in the long run, and just leave it as is.
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  6. #6
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    Everyone "sees" color differently. There are so many color theories and many unproven. It would also depend on how involved you want that color wheel.

    Are the paint chips arranged in multiple colors on the strip or single color chips?

  7. #7
    Junior Member hybearn8er's Avatar
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    Watson the color wheel is red yellow blue then it goes orange green purple next is red orange yellow orange yellow green then blue green blue violet red violet. So its 3 primary colors with the-othercolors around them as they would make the next color such as blue and yellow make green red and blue make purple red and yellow make orange ect.
    Hope this helps Anna

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    Quote Originally Posted by hybearn8er View Post
    Watson the color wheel is red yellow blue then it goes orange green purple next is red orange yellow orange yellow green then blue green blue violet red violet. So its 3 primary colors with the-othercolors around them as they would make the next color such as blue and yellow make green red and blue make purple red and yellow make orange ect.
    Hope this helps Anna
    The primary colors are red, blue and yellow. Those go at 12:00 o'clock, 4:00 amd 8:00. Purple goes between red and blue, green goes between yellow and blue and orange goes between red and yellow. Then you fill in any extra space with gradients between the two adjacent colors.

    bkay

  9. #9
    Junior Member Kaye's Avatar
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    Our guild had a speaker talk last month on using the color wheel in choosing fabric colors. It was fascinating and I am now looking a Fabrics in a new way! Also, the Quilt Roadies just interviewed Jen Kingwell on how to choose fabrics that pop when put together. She was in the Stiching Post shop and chose actual bolts of fabric. That was also a great lesson for me. You can find it through YouTube.
    Sew much to do in sew little time!

  10. #10
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    Watson, it really depends on how complex you want to get.

    For a very basic color wheel you could get by with a primary red, primary yellow and primary blue. By “primary” I mean hues of these colors that are neither warm nor cool versions of that color. Most art paints have colors that fit this description and they usuallu call them “primary red”, etc. You may be able to find color chips at the hardware store that are close, but you will need to keep in mind that the light in the hardware store may cause them to appear more warm or more cool than natural light would.

    For your secondary colors in a basic color wheel ( orange, green and purple) you would choose chips that are the color you would get by mixing two of your primary colors. In this scheme, you would want to stay away from a green that is warm (that is, one that veers a little yellow) and also from a green that is cool (veers toward blue), same with your orange and purple. A little more complex wheel would add rings for tints (white added), tones (a bit of the color from the opposite side of the color wheel added) and shades (black added).

    Many artists use a variety of different versions of the color wheel with different hues of red, yellow and blue for their primaries. Several contemporary artists do a good job explaining color theory: Steven Quiller is a painter who has several books and videos out- he demonstrates with paint.


    Katie Pasquini Masopust has a class on iquilt.com that does a good job as well, but to do her exercises you need lots of fabric scraps- however, I think you could adapt her color wheels to paint chips. In that case, I’d suggest that you take as many chips as the store will let you have, making sure to get as big a variety of hues, values etc. as you can.

    Hope that helps some.

    Rob
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  11. #11
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    Thanks, everyone. Really appreciate all the input.

    Watson

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    Jinny Beyer has a book on color (Jinny Beyer's color confidence for quilters), which provides two pullout versions of color wheels on cardboard. She recommends learning to blend shades so that you get a seamless continuum of color between any two hues. I have never quite grasped her idea of blending. On the color wheel, the primary colors are bridged by the combination colors they create (blue to blue green to green to yellow green to yellow, etc.), and I can easily see how blues bend into blue greens, into greens, into yellow greens, etc.), but I don't quite get how she blends yellow directly into purple. Maybe your library would have a copy of the book.

    Color wheels often have concentric rings, with the pure hues on the outside, the next ring being grayed colors, and the inner ring being very dark shades. I think it would be more difficult to make a wheel that didn't segregate the intensities this way.
    Lisa

  13. #13
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    Here's one: http://www.teachkidsart.net/create-y...color-wheel-2/

    and a video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYgMbXCwfPM
    (there are lots of videos on youtube)

  14. #14
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    Watson, you are basically making a rainbow in a circle. What colors you use is only limited by figuring out which are true (think primary crayon colorswithout black and brown) and whether or not they are shades (addition of black to the color) or tints, (the addition of white. A basic color wheel only has six colors three primary (red, yellow & blue) and three secondary colors green, oranges &Violet) after that is tertiary colors, between all the other colors. I donít know the words for the myriad colors you could add between all those colors.. Sorry. Remember You are looking to change colors gradually so they move smoothly to the next color. Here is a nice description of the use of a color wheel.
    https://color-wheel-artist.com/primary-colors/
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  15. #15
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    Joen Wolfrom has a color wheel out called "The Essential Color Wheel"

    It looks interesting.

    If I remember correctly, Joen's basic colors are yellow, magenta, and cyan, instead of the red, blue, and yellow that I learned in elementary school.

    I think it would be easier to buy a color wheel than to make one.

  16. #16
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    This seems like a rather time consuming project that ultimately duplicates what others have already done. You could go to the library and find several books on color theory that would have color wheels in them. In the end you will still find so many other variables in the style, scale and shades of available fabrics, that your choices will be governed more by what you see in the fabric store than what might be available in paint chips.

    Something that you might find helpful is a panel put out by Kaufman that has squares of each of the different Kona colors. There are a lot! I got mine from MSQC recently. There are probably other sources.

    I've just spent a half hour searching for a great little book of colors that I just realized I haven't seen since our move. I can't remember the title or author, but there are no words, just page after page of different color combinations. It was inspiring as a loose guide to my own reactions, but I could never seem to stick to a plan once I started looking at actual fabrics. Probably that's just me.
    True self-care is not salt baths and chocolate cake, it is making the choice to build a life you donít need to regularly escape from. ~Brianna Wiest

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