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Thread: Making Your Own Ironing Board--Did you use canvas or silver ironing fabric?

  1. #1
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    Making Your Own Ironing Board--Did you use canvas or silver ironing fabric?

    I am getting ready to make my own custom ironing board that will fit on my kitchen island (3 feet by 4 feet). I purchased a few yards of silver ironing board fabric from Joann's but have seen on a number of blogs and "how to" videos that most people are using canvas.

    Is there a reason to use one or the other? I thought the silver fabric stays cooler so you don't burn your hands as much when picking up the pressed blocks, etc.? The silver fabric I got is pretty thin though so I'm not sure if I should look for a higher quality one somewhere else. I'm thinking I'll make a small iron pad first to see how it works.

    If you made your own iron board/pad, did you use one, two or more thicknesses of batting? Sharon Shamber used only one thin layer of batting for hers--she says it is best to have a hard surface. However, I saw lots of other blogs/video use 3 to even 5 layers of batting.

    If I decide to use canvas, is there a particular kind I should search for (or quality type)?? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    I have taken a couple of classes from nationally known teachers and they all say to take that silver stuff off your ironing board because it's slippery. I have cotton duck on my board and it grips nicely so I don't get distortion when I press. It has one layer of a felted type cotton padding that's not much thicker than one layer of cotton batting.

  3. #3
    Super Member quilts4charity's Avatar
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    I covered mine with the silver stuff but I cover that with an old sheet so I can take it off and wash it when it gets stiff from all the starch I use, been working good for about 5 years now. I tie a piece of elastic around the sheet on the table to hold it in place.

  4. #4
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    I put one layer of warm & natural and then one layer of the insulbrite and then topped it with a heavy cotton twill for my "big board" and it works great. Mine is all stapled onto a sheet of plywood & sits over my regular ironing board. IF the top gets too discoloured, I will just add another layer of the cotton twill. I don't like a really soft surface to iron on and this is perfect for me. Good luck with yours!

  5. #5
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I used a layer of Warm n Natural and covered that with duck cloth (unwashed). Mine is stapled on; I would not use duck cloth if you are making a cover that will be taken off and washed.

    I think Sharon Schamber is correct and a hard surface works better for quilting. You can get the seams flatter. Cushioning is more important for embroidery.

  6. #6
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Thin plywood 38" x 28".
    Covered with plastic garbage bag - one layer.
    One layer Warm and Natural batting.
    One layer silver ironing board fabric.
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

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    I have one layer of cotton batt over plywood. I covered it with good quality muslin but I need to replace it. I have ironed so much on the surface that the fabric is brown and cracking off. I have used freezer paper ironed to my surface to extend the use and that works well. If you already have the silver stuff, I would use it. You can always replace it later if you don't like it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member omaluvs2quilt's Avatar
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    My mom used the silver stuff and its now lifting off onto her fabric when she starches. I used the canvas with 1 layer of 100% cotton batting and it works great! It does grip your blocks to help cut down on distortion while pressing.

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    I used 2 layers of warm and natural - and made a pillowcase out of cotton duck that fits snugly, but can be taken off and washed if I want - I just did it with a 2x2 piece of underlayment - not too big, but big enough .

  10. #10
    Super Member leatheflea's Avatar
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    plywood, cotton batting, and canvas on mine.

  11. #11
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    I used the silver stuff -it's on an ironing pad that I use on my cutting table so it's washable. No problems so far.

  12. #12
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    My old experience wants a hard surface to press on. If the padding is too soft or has some give and cushion, it is to soft. Being soft will distort fabrics when pressing them.

    My Ironing station is 5/8" thick plywood w/ holes drilled in it for steam to escape and covered w/ one layer of warm & natural batting and a cover of a heavy cotton muslin. It works great for me.
    peace

    EDIT: If I am using starch I will lay another piece of muslin over the board in the area where I am using starch. This absorbs the extra starch and I can just throw it in the wash and re use it with out having to change the whole cover.

    My ironing station is big. About 3'w x 4.5'l. I love it. Great for ironing yardage.
    Last edited by ube quilting; 07-15-2013 at 12:36 PM.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

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    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    What do you use if you have an ironing board that pulls the steam through? I have a Pfaff board. The board came with a foam pad, but the top was more of an open weave, not tight like canvas. The board is a real odd size.

  14. #14
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I use a Steady Betty when pressing quilt blocks and pieces. For yardage I have plain cotton fabric on a big board. I have used duck canvas and I like it. Put the cover on wet and let it dry and it will be tight on the board.
    Got fabric?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I use a Steady Betty when pressing quilt blocks and pieces. For yardage I have plain cotton fabric on a big board. I have used duck canvas and I like it. Put the cover on wet and let it dry and it will be tight on the board.

    What is a Steady Betty?

  16. #16
    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    I purchased pillow ticking at Joann's. I liked it better than the canvas or the duck cloth. I do prefer a thicker pad than is mentioned here -- but that's me. I bought this one from Joann's with a coupon and am very happy with it.
    http://www.joann.com/heavy-duty-ultr...prd_10687572a/

  17. #17
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    Plywood, cotton batting, pre washed flannel. Done!

  18. #18
    Senior Member Scraplady's Avatar
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    I bought some of that silver stuff and it stuck to my iron on the highest settings. I've never had a commercially made ironing board cover of that fabric to stick like that. I am glad I tried it out before I stapled it down. My board now consists of 1" thick plywood, a layer of heavy duty foil, two layers Warm & Natural, topped of with some blah old cotton twill the color of dirty dishwater. (I think it is supposed to be blue?) I didn't have any other use for it but it made a perfect cover for the board. When it gets dirty, I will make a new cover with elastic to pop over that one.
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  19. #19
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    My mom had a layer of cotton batting covered with heavy canvas then over that she put a couple layers made of sections of old sheets that were traded out periodically.

    This was for one of those nifty old ironing boards that folded up into a cabinet recessed in the wall of the kitchen.

  20. #20
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I used a Terry cloth towel for my covering... as nothing slides off , it holds blocks in place when pressing( so no stretching) and I take it off and wash it frequently. Its amazing how fast an ironing board cover can get dirty. When I first put it back on after a wash I just run the iron over it once , and its smooth but enough friction to hold things in place.

  21. #21
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z View Post
    What is a Steady Betty?
    http://www.steadybetty.com/

    I have a steady betty but have found that cotton duck works just as well for keeping fabrics from slipping all over the place. It's inexpensive, widely available, and if you don't prewash it, with a good spritzing of water it will shrink tightly around your ironing board for a perfect fit.

  22. #22
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    More than 10 years ago, DH and I made the Big Board, using plywood, cotton batting and canvas type muslin. Since then I have replaced the cover whenever it gets gross . I've used different cotton fabrics and the silver ironing board material (which is on the board right now). They all work fine for me. The cotton batting is still good. Love it.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ube quilting View Post
    My old experience wants a hard surface to press on. If the padding is too soft or has some give and cushion, it is to soft. Being soft will distort fabrics when pressing them.

    My Ironing station is 5/8" thick plywood w/ holes drilled in it for steam to escape and covered w/ one layer of warm & natural batting and a cover of a heavy cotton muslin. It works great for me.
    peace

    EDIT: If I am using starch I will lay another piece of muslin over the board in the area where I am using starch. This absorbs the extra starch and I can just throw it in the wash and re use it with out having to change the whole cover.

    My ironing station is big. About 3'w x 4.5'l. I love it. Great for ironing yardage.
    I was also told to make one, you needed to use a thicker wood like 5/8" pressboard and drill holes, cover with a layer of warm & natural batting, then staple on a layer of cotton duck. This would keep the wood from warping when you use steam and be hard enough to get a good press. I have 2---one is smaller that I take to classes and applique day, and the other is about 18"X24" that I can sit on kitchen island. I LOVE mine!

  24. #24
    Super Member deedum's Avatar
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    DH made me a big board ironing board several years ago and I love it. I did use the silver ironing board material. Works great!

  25. #25
    Super Member sparkys_mom's Avatar
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    I just made one using Sharon Schamber's advice.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LGbXou_u4c

    The only thing I did differently was I used a home dec fabric from Joann. I thought it would be fun to look at when I'm pressing. I bought a precut board at Home Depot 24x48" x 1/2" thick to keep the weight down and I love it!! By getting the 1/2" thick board instead of 3/4" it isn't too heavy for me to move from one room to another as needed. Sometimes I use it in my sewing room and other times I put it on my kitchen counter.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Pat

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