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Thread: Need encouragement. Cal King on home sewing machine

  1. #1
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    So my rather tall son is getting married to the sweetest young woman. Ambitious mom is making a Cal King quilt for the bride and groom. The top is done and finnished at 10 ft x 10 ft (120"x120")). This means that right now I just finnished spray bastig a back 135 "x135" backing onto a similar size batting. Next I am spray basting the 10 feet square top center onto that. After that it is supposed to go on a Janome 6500. The throat is a bit larger then most standard machines but the couple extra inches are not going to make THAT much difference. HELP! I already told DS if I can't do it I might just tie it till I ever get a long arm. LOL About three more weeks till the wedding.

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Since you've already spray-basted to the backing, I'm not sure this will help.

    You can separate the batting into 3 pieces. This eliminates the bulk on each side while you are machine quilting the center. I first saw this technique described in detail in a book by Debra Wagner. Marti Michell now has a book out on how to do it. A long time ago I posted how to do it, and someone later PM'd me that it had worked very well for you. Later on, if I can find my old post, I will link it here.

    Haven't found my old post (200 pages of old posts to work through!). However, here is a link to the Marti Michell book:
    http://www.amazon.com/Machine-Quilti.../dp/B000NNGZJE

    I'm not absolutely certain, but I think this is the Debra Wagner book that has excellent instructions on this technique:
    http://www.amazon.com/Traditional-Qu...dp/0801986605/

  3. #3
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    you might want to find a good friend with a long arm that will let you borrow some time on it. I am having trouble with an over sized twin that is almost the size of a full/double. on my home machine. but then again my machine is really small in size.

  4. #4
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    Use the nest technique instead of rolling the quilt. It's always helped me overcome similar problems.

    http://daystyledesigns.com/faq.htm#roll

  5. #5
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Keep bringing on the ideas! I am reading. Thanks!!!!!!

    The quilt has sashing and blocks that are set on point so I am not sure how the three pieces of batting would have worked but I can sure see this for another quilt. Never thought of it and so simple.

    I think I normally nest but was planning to roll this time so I will definitely need to read the nest technique.

    Alas no friends with long arms and I have like $0 right now available to pay anyone. I think the Lord wants to humble me and have me do this one on the home machine.

    I did opt for warm and natural over the 80/20 since I can quilt it every ten inches or so versus every four.

    Thank you sofar for all the feedback.

  6. #6
    Super Member Shelbie's Avatar
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    A king sized quilt will go through a Janome 6500. I have now done three King sized quilts on my Janome 6500. After my quilt is basted-pinned securely, I stitch down the lengthwise centre (this is the hardest of all) and then stitch through the centre width-wise. My quilt is then divided in four and I quilt one quadrant at a time. I am not an expert machine quilter by any means but was able to machine quilt these big quilts quite satisfactorily. It helps to have extra table space around your machine to hold the weight of your quilt. My machine is in a cabinet, so I pull it out from the wall and put a fold up table from Costco behind it for extra support. I don't really roll my quilt but "puddle" or bunch it up a little to get where I want to quilt. By twisting and turning, eventually your quilt will get done.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annaquilts
    The quilt has sashing and blocks that are set on point so I am not sure how the three pieces of batting would have worked but I can sure see this for another quilt. Never thought of it and so simple.
    If you were planning to machine quilt diagonally, then I think it would work fine on this type of quilt as long as you also cut the batting diagonally. The middle piece would go from one corner to the other corner.

    The trick to getting the pieces of batting to match up perfectly is to cut the batting with a rotary cutter using a large "S" pattern. Put some registration marks along the cut edge, and also mark the batting pieces (such as "top right" and "top left") to make sure you reassemble the batting exactly as it was. Debra Wagner recommended hand tacking the batting together using a tailor's tack stitch, but it probably works just as well to use a wide and long machine zigzag. Cutting in the large "S" curves makes sure the quilt does not ultimately develop a fold line where the batting pieces were sewn back together.

  8. #8
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I did a king size quilt set on point and did it on a small dinky Brother - I started in the middle and worked out. It was just bulky but it worked fine. I did SITD.

  9. #9
    pookie ookie's Avatar
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    I think you should dangle a carrot. Promise yourself something amazing at the end. Trust me. You will deserve it.

  10. #10
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pookie ookie
    I think you should dangle a carrot. Promise yourself something amazing at the end. Trust me. You will deserve it.
    LOL You are so right. I think just being done will thrill me beyond pieces. My son is aware I am strugling and I do not want him to know really. I am so looking forward to working on anything but this quilt but maybe the next one should be a project I want to work on just for me and something not so large. Definitely piecing, learning to use some of those fun new rules I bought and not quilting for a month or two. Maybe I can dream about my reward project as I am struggling with the anaconda. Some how all I can think about is a long arm machine. Hehehehe

  11. #11
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stitchnripper
    I did a king size quilt set on point and did it on a small dinky Brother - I started in the middle and worked out. It was just bulky but it worked fine. I did SITD.
    It is so good to hear this. I definitely plan to only quilt the minimum. Thanks for sharing your succes. When I'll feel frustrated it is good to know some other people did it and it is possible.

  12. #12
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelbie
    A king sized quilt will go through a Janome 6500. I have now done three King sized quilts on my Janome 6500.
    Woohooo! Thank you for sharing your experiences and tips. All very encouraging and helpfull.

  13. #13
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    If you were planning to machine quilt diagonally, then I think it would work fine on this type of quilt as long as you also cut the batting diagonally. The middle piece would go from one corner to the other corner.
    Thanks for this tip. I think since I am basted already I will try and puddle and do sections but if worse comes to worse this would definitely be a good option to try and I will definitely keep it in mind for the next King quilt. Truely you think I might try this again? LOL

  14. #14
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    You can do it!!!!

  15. #15
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I usually quilted larger quilts in sections, but my first diamond log cabin star (93x104, so not as large as your quilt) couldn't be divided up that way. I wound up basting the whole thing with water soluble thread on the John Flynn frame (first and last time I used that frame, but it did the job) and then I did FMQ on my Bernina. The water soluble thread held it together really well so that I didn't have the additional weight and bulk of pins while I was quilting, plus I didn't have to take them out as I went or risk running over them (or sticking myself with them). I have never used the basting spray and would worry about it holding up with a quilt that large.

    Prism99's idea should work even if the quilt is set on point. Marti Michell explains how to do on-point quilts in her book - really a good resource if you're going to quilt large quilts on a DSM.

  16. #16
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    There is a lik some where that you cut the battting and quilt in sections...hang on...looking for it.

  17. #17
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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  18. #18
    Senior Member jlong's Avatar
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    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-64610-1.htm
    I did a very large quilt and divided it into three large sections. It went together easily. Hope this helps.

  19. #19
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JulieR
    Use the nest technique instead of rolling the quilt. It's always helped me overcome similar problems.

    http://daystyledesigns.com/faq.htm#roll
    That is the way that I fold my quilts, my other tip is to divide it into 4 sort of!

    I quilt a line right down the centre of the quilt and then a line across the side/s which divides it into 4. I then quilt 1 quarter at a time, it doesn't overpower my mind that way.

    One tip tho' use a FMQ design that is not directional, I normally stick to the good ole stipple design for most of my big quilts.

    Do let us know how you get on, please.

  20. #20
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    I'd say start in the center and branch out, just because then you can tell yourself that the worse part is over and it can only get better. While you work you will promise yourself several times that you will never do this again, but I am sure you will. Make sure to take breaks and if by any chance you can not finish, give them a picture and an IOU card. Don't stress yourself out and make sure you check the back often to make sure is not bunching, because even if you use plenty of spray, it can bunch some. Also keep you eye out for the edges. You don't want the backing to fold back and quilted into the back of the quilt...Don't ask me how I know. Make sure you are listening to the machine. It may sound different when you add an extra layer to the quilting accidentally.

    Good luck and show us pictures.

  21. #21
    Super Member ssgramma's Avatar
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    You can do it! You have all the tips - puddle, don't roll, middle out, support for the weight, etc.

    Go for it! I have done a Queen on a little Brother. You and your Janome can handle a King just fine.

  22. #22
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I don't have any advice to add, but I can cheer you on :D
    Go Anna Go!! Go Anna Go!! :D:D:D

  23. #23
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    Hi Anna, you can do this on your home machine. I've done quilts that are quite large on mine and though it seems intimidating, even impossible at times, it can be done! :-D
    Here's a link to Diane Gaudynski's site that may give you more inspiration and help. http://www.dianegaudynski.net/ She's an award winning quilter who does all her work on her home machine. Good luck and let us know how it turns out. :-)

  24. #24
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    Shelbie-after you divide the 4 quadrants, do you start quilting in the center of the quadrant or do you start at the edge of the quadrant where they meet?

    I've tried the dividing, the puddling, I've made a "boxy" table top so there's no drag, I've got a fairly large throat area, but it's still a pain in the behind fighting the quilt. I haven't tried the dividing the quadrants though.

  25. #25
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelbie
    A king sized quilt will go through a Janome 6500. I have now done three King sized quilts on my Janome 6500. After my quilt is basted-pinned securely, I stitch down the lengthwise centre (this is the hardest of all) and then stitch through the centre width-wise. My quilt is then divided in four and I quilt one quadrant at a time. I am not an expert machine quilter by any means but was able to machine quilt these big quilts quite satisfactorily. It helps to have extra table space around your machine to hold the weight of your quilt. My machine is in a cabinet, so I pull it out from the wall and put a fold up table from Costco behind it for extra support. I don't really roll my quilt but "puddle" or bunch it up a little to get where I want to quilt. By twisting and turning, eventually your quilt will get done.
    @Shelbie,
    While I would jump off a bridge before I ever attempted to home quilt a king size quilt (or a queen, probably not even a twin ;) ), this is a really good idea. Simple, but with the extra tables all the weight is to the back and side of the machine. It would really work for a quilt of any size.

    Thanks for mentioning it.

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