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Thread: Need help please! Yards and yards of wet fabric

  1. #101
    Senior Member schwanton's Avatar
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    Some people recommend cutting triangle off of each corner off of or using pinking shears along cut edge. Do you have anyone who could help you prepare the fabric as you wash them?

  2. #102
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    you may want to also price a dehumidifier for your basement. this helps to keep your basement from smelling and molding when you have a constant wet or damp situation from your floor. This is a common situatuation in alot of older homes in in Illinois and Wisconsin. But they also usually have sump pumps installed in the floor area, like a small square or round area opening 2 to 3 feet deep where the pump goes that pumps out the water that builds up under the foundation area.

  3. #103
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    This happened to me. My neighbour left a tap running in his flat and went out for the day. When I got home, my flat was flooded as well (good construction here, also). All of my family photographs and fabric were soaked. I found the best way was to put as much fabric as would fit (without too much stuffing) into a large pillowslip and place what would fit into a dryer. The larger one at the laundromat took a doona stuffed with material.Ithink your word for 'doona' might be 'douvet' cover. Hope this helps.

  4. #104
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    i would do smaller loads maybe only 3 to 4 yards at a time this might avoid some tangles. so sorry for you i hope this works out and you dont lose any stuff good luck

  5. #105
    Super Member bjnicholson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UglyCook
    I would just wash and dry as quickly as possible and worry about the edges later.
    I agree. Before you have mildew to contend with.

  6. #106
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    has happened to me. I just washed it all and trimmed the edges later. Ironing everything was the REAL pain. good luck

  7. #107
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    I agree with everyone else about vinegar in the water; it will remove the odor and will set some colors that have a tendency to run. Also, the tip about clipping the corners is right on! The threads won't ravel into a huge birds' nest if you clip a small triangle off each corner. I do this also to remind myself that the fabric has, in fact, been washed. Good luck!

  8. #108
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    If you only fill the dryer so that the fabric moves freely, and fold it immediately, you can probably "hand press" it enough to fold it for storage. Then, of course, you will need to iron/press it before cutting it.

  9. #109

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    Cindy, I know what you have been through. I live in Pleasanton and we had nearly as much rain as you did....just no basements...or not anyone I know. Got quite a bit more yesterday and today with Karl. Not complaining. Last year was horribly dry.

    I agree with all the suggestions you have gotten here. Lots of vinegar, clipping the corners...will really cut down on the ravels.

    Hope you are able to save it all.
    Virginia

  10. #110
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    i agree with all of the above !!

  11. #111
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    ok it looks like you have them mildew/smell under control so I'm not going to address that but I will say what you need to do is check into a way to have the run off the water directed away from the basement walls/ house foundation. It will help with keeping the basement dry. You may have to dig around the whole foundation about 18 inch down and put in drain pipes (black drain pipes with holes in it) add gravel around it to help with water flow then cover the gravel with landscaping cloth, then back fill with dirt around the foundation so it slants away from the house. Most of the time when a basement has leakage is because the water stays against the walls with no where to go so it leaks through but if you can get it to drain away it doesn't stay long enough to seep through the walls.

  12. #112
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    if moisture repeatedly gets into the basement it will start to smell sour down there, just like mine does all summer, because i have no ventilation. i run my dehumidifier from may until september and i still can't stay in front of it. and i don't even get water down there! just mild dampness from new jersey clay. point being: rethink storing fabric there. if it's really the only space, get it into containers with ventilated tops, well off the floor. put some potpouri or lavender in the containers. keep something on hand to un-smell the basement when necessary.
    smack that contractor. he should have warned you about water in basements. if you have windows try to keep them open. you might feel safer with bars or something. if you have a/c then run it. it takes moisture out of the air.
    i hope you get ahead of this. dry everything as soon as possible, and get to the washing when you can. if it has to wait, it should wait dry. if you don't know what a fiber content is, or if something will bleed, use a color catcher or retayne. i always use retayne, but a lot of members here use the catchers. better safe than sorry. bad problem. sorry this happened to you.

  13. #113

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    Adding to the wonderful advice you already have, when you dry your fabric, put a bath towel in with it. The towel helps decrease the fabric twist and tangle.

  14. #114

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    Where in South Texas do you live? I also live in South Texas, Freeport. Located just south of Houston. If we are anywhere near each other, I'd love to help. I would be glad to take some home with me and wash and iron them. Clipping the corners will help some, putting the smaller pieces in a garment washing bag will help as well as the vinegar. Let me know what I can do.
    Kathy (mammy) Mageors

  15. #115

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    I agree with everyone above but you might consider useing pinking shears to trim the edges before washing and adding the vinegar.Keep us posted!

  16. #116
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    All you can do in that South Texas humidity is wash and dry every fabric, even those that didn't seem to be wet, because mildew you do NOT need! Before washing, hold the ends of the fabric together and snip a small diagonal piece out of both corners. That will help to keep the fabric from fraying so badly. You'll still have some fraying, but not nearly as much as you would if you didn't do that. Be sure those fabrics are completely dry - bone dry - before you refold them. Bless your heart - I can really sympathize with you. But what kind of a builder would be insane enough to build a basement in South Texas, where if you dig down twelve inches, you have instant swimming pool? Keeriminy! He oughtta be sued!

  17. #117
    Senior Member ShirlR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy N
    I would load it all into the car and drive to the nearest laundramat and utilize every machine they have to wash it all at once by color family. Throw a color catcher in every load and a cup of vinegar. then you will have the large folding tables to fold the fabric. Take your scissors with you so you can trim off the stringies as you fold it. It will be a good morning's work but will make your life so much easier than trying to do it a load at a time at home. Good luck, if you were nearby we would all help.
    Great advice, all encapsulated in a short paragraph. I like your style!

  18. #118
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    Without reading all the posts, wash using Oxyclean and or vinegar. I use a non perfumed, non dye detergent because DD has chemical allergies.
    After washing, do not put in dryer, hang dry. Putting in dryer may set the smells. Wash until no odors or mold are present (I know you said that had not happened, but believe me, it is there). You may have to do alot of ironong afterwards, but you can save your fabric. It is not ruined as long as you don't let it sit around wert for days and days.

  19. #119
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    I love the response by one of the board---just think of all the fun you will have saying "Hello !" to all those wonderful fabrics you might not have seen for a while. AND--your stash will be all sorted once more. But still sorry this has happened to you.

  20. #120
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    If you have a pair of pinking shears, you can pink the edges & they won't hardly ravel at all. You can leave the fabric folded & pink two layers at one time. Good luck!

  21. #121
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    As with everyone else, wash and fold to store, leaving ironing for later. I would also consider storing your fabric in plastic bins...helped save a lot of work when I left the water faucet on outside, just near the window well and had 1/4th of an inch one the basement floor.

    If you have, or can get to the cement walls of your basement, there is a sealer that can be applied with a paint brush. It is white which can be painted over later if you wish. It even sealed the crack in the wall which is a result of the foundation setteling...home was built in the mid-50's. Keep us posted as to the cause of the leak.

  22. #122
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    soak in washer with ammonia then rinse out you dont have to run a full cycle and cause more raveling

  23. #123
    Super Member C.Cal Quilt Girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    It may even be necessary to take it to a laundromat and get it done all at once -

    If you can't get it washed all at once - at least try to get it dry to minimize possible mildew - and then wash it when you can.

    If possible, line dry - don't machine dry - before washing it again.
    Thinking the same if possible, all at once !!
    Glad your OK thru the storm :-D

  24. #124
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    I would just wash it. God bless. Penny

  25. #125
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    I know what a mangle is. I can still see my mom ironing tablecloths and sheets on it.

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