Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 5 6
Results 126 to 148 of 148

Thread: Need help please! Yards and yards of wet fabric

  1. #126

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    21
    We painted our walls with a water proofer paint, but boxes or material even our tent box wicked moisture through the walls. This took several years, but we had a mess to go through not much mold, but not a pleasant odor. I will never put boxes or cloth next to the walls without an air space. I learned my lesson the hard way also. There needs to be an air space. I would have thought your contractor would have known this.

  2. #127
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    10,789
    I never sew the raw edges. Do wash on a more gentle cycle and then thumble dry normall. Even if it has a little mildew it might come out. I had this one time with my winter clothing when we lived in a trailer. You might consider going to a launder mat when it is more quite ansd do massive loads.
    so sorry to hear. Hope everything else is well in your life.

  3. #128
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Georgetown, Texas
    Posts
    345
    You've got to love TEXAS weather, I understand your problem, about a week and half ago Georgetown (central Texas) where I live got 15 1/2 inches in a day and a half...no wet material, but some around here lost all they owned...I agree, vinegar and wash asap...and worry about the ragged edges later..Good Luck

  4. #129
    Quilter4HireAndFun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Plano,TX
    Posts
    237
    I can't take the time to read all the pages here just now, so forgive me if my idea is not the only one like mine...but call any and all friends you have and ask them to take ten large pieces of fabric. Give them instructions how you want it cared for. Tell them they can keep any one piece they like in exchange for helping you out. You will get it wash and dried in a lot less time, and perhaps someday you can return the favor. This is what friends, small sewing groups and family are for!

  5. #130
    Senior Member cimarron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Heartland
    Posts
    339
    IF you have access to a BIG size commercial washer/dryer nearby I'd separate by colors, knowing new fabrics will likely run and wash loads (big loads) with vinegar and laundry soap. Guess I'd call and check with an Extension Office to see if they have any further recommendations tomorrow...but today I'd be at the commercial laundry with the huge "comforter" size washers and start washing and drying asap...before destroyed forever. If you were closer I'd offer to take a load, etc. IF bunch of us online are nearby you might get us to all take a load today to get it finished asap.

  6. #131
    Senior Member cimarron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Heartland
    Posts
    339
    Quote Originally Posted by dott443
    Borax will also take the mildew out of clothes. It will not bleach fabric, also can use less detergent. Always use in my wash loads.
    Do they still make Boraxo, or do you recommend something else. My mom used to use that but I've not seen it for years...or missed it! Lately have been wanting to use "natural" cleaners, so wondered about that product...or similar. Thank you.

    :-)

  7. #132
    Quilter4HireAndFun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Plano,TX
    Posts
    237
    If you live by a feed store, I am sure you can find this wonderful product called, "Orvus." It is used to cleanly and safely wash animals. It has no harmful products inside and is safe to use on your clothes and all quilting materials. A lot of professional quilt appraisers suggest using this products to clients and museums for quilt care. A little bit goes a very, very long way, and this product is usually sold by the gallons, so split the cost and share with other quilters! I just use a tablespoon or so for a large load. Very cost effective and safe...also environmentally safe, no phosphates.

  8. #133
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Some where in way out West Texas
    Posts
    3,042
    Blog Entries
    3
    I agree with bearisgray, I think I would take the rest to the laundry mat and wash the rest all at once. The sooner the better.

  9. #134
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Gueydan, LA Duck Capital of America
    Posts
    15
    There is a concrete and paint on the market that is water proof. You can buy it at Lowe's and probably any hardware store. My sewing room occasionally gets water in it. We found the leak and are in the process of sealing it. Good luck.

  10. #135
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Round Rock,Texas
    Posts
    6,134
    Quilt Queen,
    I'm in Round Rock,Tx and we got 10" in that time period.
    I'm so glad my house is on high ground and no where near any creeks or lakes. I have friends that got 2' of water in their houses. I was just shocked how much flooding there was.
    Sharon Weaver
    :cry:

  11. #136

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    8
    About your water problem with your basement.
    I used to live in Ct. what we did was there is a specail kind of paint that is applied to the wals that helps to stop the leaks. It did for us, we had some pretty bad leaks in our basement, got the wall all painted and never did have any more leaks after that. I don't remember what the product was called, but I am sure at any hardware store, they would know. Hope this helps.
    Yes, wash your material in some vinegar, that will help to remove the smell. I am guesssing some of the fabric will ravel others might not.

  12. #137
    Junior Member MsMel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Salem, OR
    Posts
    228
    Quote Originally Posted by featherweight
    You can also clip a little triangle off of each corner. This will keep it from raveling. Good luck. Just think how nice and clean it will be when you are all finished.
    I have done this to wash vintage fabric and it worked very well. Even on smaller pieces. Good luck.

  13. #138
    Super Member mshawii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon suburbs
    Posts
    1,054
    If you can, snip about a 1.4 inch into the raw edges to prevent the tangles. Even trimming a triangle helps a bit but the snips will help as well. Makes the strings shorter and easier to untangle. Good luck!

  14. #139
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    181
    Not a reply but a question (I'm not sure exactly how to post this): Does anybody have a Juki Exceed 600 series machine or a Janome Jem Platinum. If so, how do you like them?

    Thanks and sorry for putting this in the wrong place.

    Danade

  15. #140
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    7,755
    Concur with cold water wash and white vinegar. One other thing that you need to do is to look into having a french drain and a sump pump installed in your basement. (I'm assuming that the basement floor and walls aren't finished - but either way you probably need the french drain and sump pump.) That's somewhat costly, but will also prevent mold and mildew, which is far more costly in the long run.

    We have an older house where we had to redo the entire basement floor and add a french drain/sump pump. We got estimates between $23,000 with a "2good2btrue clause" that guaranteed we'd get all our money back in 3 years (probably took sales training from Bernie Madoff!) and $8500. We went with the contractor who estimated $8500. He did a terrific job. The contractor advised us to drill weeping holes in some of the cinder blocks of the wall, and to regrade the land on one side of the house. The weeping holes in the wall allow water that comes in from outside to quickly drain to the french drain instead of slowly seeping through the cinder blocks, which works as a food factory for mold! Haven't had water problems since.

    Just to make you laugh a bit...while the contractor was prepping the floor, he took the pole that the washing machine drained into out of the floor. He came out of the basement with a puzzled, slightly amused look on his face. He handed the pole to my husband and said "There is no drainage pipe in the floor for this, and it's not hooked up to your plumbing. Your washing machine has been draining into the basement floor for years!"

    No wonder the floor was such a mess!

  16. #141
    Member tobylehnj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    48
    Sorry to hear of your water problem. Yes, wash as much as you can and quickly to avoid mildew. You could use a rotary cutter with a pinking blade to minimise raveling.

    You might also try to paint the basement walls with paint that keep water from going thru. But even better is getting the fabric away from the walls. Or you can move it up stair away from the basement.... Let us know what you do hand how well it works. I wish I had a basement...... No basement, cement slabs... I live to close to the water even tho I don't have a lagoon near me.

  17. #142
    Dee
    Dee is offline
    Super Member Dee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pa.
    Posts
    3,618
    Wash all asap. and add vingar. Good luck. Sorry all got wet.

  18. #143
    Super Member Annya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Queensland Australia
    Posts
    1,387
    Quote Originally Posted by fluffy10
    We painted our walls with a water proof paint, but boxes or material even our tent box wicked moisture through the walls. This took several years, but we had a mess to go through not much mold, but not a pleasant odor. I will never put boxes or cloth next to the walls without an air space. I learned my lesson the hard way also. There needs to be an air space. I would have thought your contractor would have known this.
    There is a paint that is used on repairing cracks in the cement tanks that I think will be the best, only it is black but I am sure that once it is dry properly , you will be able to paint it what ever color you want. I don't know what it is called in the US but ask your nearest plumber he will probably know and tell you where to get it. It is tar based and might smell a little but if you can stop the leaks any thing is worth looking into. Just my husband he called the stuff BLACKJACK. He says not the right name but it is close as I can give you.

  19. #144
    Member knotty quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    SE Iowa
    Posts
    6
    Clipping a triangle off of each corner works great. I do this to every piece of fabric I prewash.

  20. #145
    Super Member VickiM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,155
    If I can't serge the ends, then I set my washer on hand wash to wash all the material I get at yard/estate sales. I find I don't get nearly the strings. Pieces are put in mesh bags, and color catcher is added. Good luck.

  21. #146
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West Roxbury, Ma
    Posts
    10,360
    Wash them as soon as possible and add some oxyclean and even fabreeze to the wash. I would also cut the edges off as best as possible before putting them in the drier so there would be less fraying of the edges in the drier.

  22. #147
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Rice Lake, WI
    Posts
    489
    Quote Originally Posted by HeatherQuilts
    For the wet basement part... Kilz and Drylock both make a waterproofing paint, specifically for basements or garages that let water in.
    http://www.masterchem.com/masterchem...006b0910acRCRD

    http://www.ugl.com/drylokMasonry/mas...ofer/latex.php

    So, I would use one of these on your walls while you are washing all that fabric (with vinegar!!) to prevent it from happening again.

    Good luck!
    Two years ago my mom's basement flooded due to a cracked outside faucet. What a mess! She lost alot of stuff and the whole basement had to be redone.
    Her basement always smelled damp/musty so we used drylok, put on 2 coats and no moisture problems since. Doesn't smell musty anymore either.
    I would recommend that you run a dehumidifier at all times if you plan to keep your sewing machine and fabric down there. Makes a huge differnece.
    Best of luck to you.

  23. #148
    np3
    np3 is offline
    Power Poster np3's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    14,029
    Blog Entries
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by oldhag
    I would also put the smaller pieces into a mesh bag to wash them as there is less chance of them raveling as much.
    I was going to suggest a large mesh laundry bag. It will cut down on the raveling on the bigger pieces as well.

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 5 6

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.