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Thread: Nervous, high anxiety to start on my first quilt by myself......

  1. #1
    Senior Member Stitch124's Avatar
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    Question Nervous, high anxiety to start on my first quilt by myself......

    Have you ever felt frozen to start on a new quilt project. I feel that way especially because this is my first quilt project after I've finished my first quilting class. Lots of anxiety because: 1) I'm afraid I'm going to cut the fabric wrong, 2) I won't lay it out correctly so that it looks the best to sew, 3) I can't remember everything I learned in the class even thought I had great fun, 4) most of all -- I don't have a dedicated place to sew in my house. The kitchen table is it and my grandkids will get into everything even if I put it all away...when I get it back out to work on, they are right there wanting to 'help' which breaks my concentration. They live with me so it's not like I can get away by myself. I have a small place, and there's no room to sew anywhere else. My project is the Yellow Brick Road by Atkinson Designs. Already have the fabric, just cutting, piecing, sewing and etc now.

    Any advice and encouragement would be appreciated.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
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    I'm guessing your grandkids are to young for school. Wow I can understand your stressing!You need a place to be able to put away while your working on it that is OFF LIMITS. Perhaps your bedroom and put a lock on it? Does the parent/parents live with you also? If so maybe a trip to a park or school playground while you sew is possible. I'm sure you will do great!As for forgetting what you learned in class...That's pretty much a given with me if I don't take allot of notes and practice right away LOL

  3. #3
    Junior Member kittykatz2001's Avatar
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    Just jump in and know that all of us quilters have made tons of mistakes. Take a deep breath and enjoy the process. It's supposed to be fun. When you finish you will be so proud of yourself. The grandies will just have to learn not to bother it. If they're old enough you might give them something to do themselves. You could precut some blocks on muslin and let them draw pictures with crayons and once it's pressed, it's permanent. Use an embroidery hoop to keep it taut. A friend of mine made pot holders out of her grandies' pictures.
    Kittykatz
    Everyone you meet comes with baggage. Find someone who loves you enough to unpack. Anonymous

  4. #4
    Senior Member Stitch124's Avatar
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    Love the idea of picture with crayons made into pot holders. How do you press the muslin without getting melted crayons on the iron soleplate?

  5. #5
    Junior Member Xtgirl's Avatar
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    You press it face down onto a paper bag. The wax transfers to the bag and the color remains
    The Potomac Quilter
    Innova 26 with Lightning Stitch and Autopilot

  6. #6
    Junior Member x7lillies's Avatar
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    I always say to measure four times and cut once...or was that five times? I've had my share of mishaps when cutting pieces for a quilt. I was making a quilt for my sister once, a log cabin full-size quilt. I put it together using strips, and I make all the blocks at once. That means that I cut all the fabric into the right number of strips (and there are two different widths for my log cabin blocks). Well, I ended up cutting one fabric's set of strips too narrow...all of them! When I had a bunch of fabric left over, I realized my mistake. I ended up cutting out more strips to sew to the narrow ones, so that they'd be the right width with the seam allowance, but now all my strips had a seam in the middle of them...

    But my sister loved the quilt anyway. Lesson learned: no quilt will be completely free of mistakes and perfect. But more often than not, the only person who cares about those mistakes are you! Did you reverse a seam you pressed while stitching? No one will see...but it does bug me. For me, quilting has been a lesson in letting it go. I'd rather have a quilt from my grandmother with a small mistake that I can find than one that was perfect. That way, I feel like someone (an actual person) made it with love, imperfections and all!
    - Kim

    kimkolbquilts.etsy.com

  7. #7
    Senior Member leggz48's Avatar
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    all good advice.....especially the part about "enjoy the process". You'll be surprised at what you will subconciously remember from your class. As for the kiddos.......it's important that they learn parameters while they are young. Be stern in letting them know what is off limits...and then follow through with enforcing your expectations that they respect your rules.
    Linda

  8. #8
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    Did/Do you wash your fabrics before cutting them? It can be done even without having a washer and dryer in/on the premises. I would soak each color in hot water in a separate kettle or bowl - drain the water out - one could set the fabrics in a colander to drain some more - and then they can be line dried - I would bring the selvages together and hand the fabric by the selvage edge

    How old are the grandchildren? Are you their full time caretaker?

    As far as 'forgetting' what you learned in class - almost everyone forgets over half of what was taught in a class - repetition is what reinforces what one learned.

    Can you get a tote that will slide under your bed? It's a bother to have to put everything away all the time - but it's a bigger bother to have stuff messed up.

  9. #9
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    In your situation, it might be best to find a local quilt shop where you can go to sew and let someone else watch the grandkids for a while. Don't stress about getting the fabrics in the perfect place - there is no such thing as the perfect place. Put them in an arrangement that's pleasing to you, and don't stress over it. YBR is a very forgiving pattern, and if you've forgotten something chances are it won't matter, or you'll remember it later.

  10. #10
    Super Member Crqltr's Avatar
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    I have laid blocks out on a flannel sheet then rolled them up they stay pretty good ...might help you to not lose your place every time you pack up.

  11. #11
    Super Member rusty quilter's Avatar
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    Funny thing is--we all forget that it is "just fabric". Your mortgage is NOT on the line--just your pride!

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    I just pieced my first quilt together...and my blocks didn't line up and I have a 'gap' between the block and border in one section. But it's mine...and I love it regardless. I'm proud of my first quilt...done with no instruction other than watching you tube videos. Regardless of how it comes out, you should be proud.

  13. #13
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rusty quilter View Post
    Funny thing is--we all forget that it is "just fabric". Your mortgage is NOT on the line--just your pride!
    Amen!! Also, keep asking yourself:
    What is the worst thing that can happen?
    And IF that worst thing happens, what then?
    And then, what then?
    and....so????? It's not a crisis, it's an opportunity.
    Can I save the fabric I mis-cut and use it later when I am more experienced?
    If I have a question, is there someone I can ask?
    Can I look it up online?
    What if that doesn't work?? What then?
    And then, what then?
    Will chocolate and a kiddie hug help my mood?
    What then?

    Always remember there is a way out of your 'worst case scenario'. You are a beginner. That means you do NOT 'know everything' yet; mistakes are often the very best way to learn. If you already knew all about quilting, you wouldn't be asking here, so accept your limitations and realize that mistakes, and therefore the learning/design/new-way-to-do-it opportunities, are the best part!!

    You'll be fine; JUST DO IT!

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

  14. #14
    Member Sewcrazy12's Avatar
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    Where do you live? Maybe there is a board member close to you, and he or she could help you. If you were close to me, I could help.
    Just be sure you put a cutting mat down on the table before you cut your fabric. If you cut it wrong, you can always buy more. Take time to think of what your doing, and you will do it fine. Good luck.

  15. #15
    Senior Member rush88888's Avatar
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    perhaps having the kiddies around makes you a little nervous. maybe you could quilt when they are asleep for the night or taking a nap. but, then again, maybe that is when you need to sleep in order to keep up with them while they are awake. you will find your time and your rhythm.

  16. #16
    Super Member Knitette's Avatar
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    I haven't been quilting long and had never sewed before. That feeling of fear, mixed with exhilaration, is very fresh in my mind! I survived to go on and make more quilts and smaller projects, most of them better than the last.

    As well as all the things I've learned along the way (and that learning curve has been steep, I can tell you), the most important thing I've learned is to relax and enjoy the process! You may make mistakes, but so what? It's how everyone learns. Anyway, it's not a 'mistake', it's a 'design opportunity'

    If you get stuck, there's the internet, this board and probably your LQS where you did your class to help.

    Good luck and be sure to post pictures when you're done.
    Lang may yer lum reek. (I'm a knitter - hence - 'Knit-ette'. Confuses a lot of people!)

  17. #17
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    Even tho I've been quilting for a while, I sometimes get the "is this going to be ok"? But then I figure if I screw up, it's a "design oppertunity" and it will work somewhere.

  18. #18
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    We don't know how "much" the original poster has invested in this.

    For some people, $5 out of the budget is a major hit. For others, $500 isn't even noticed.

    We also don't know where the fabrics were acquired - it can be awkward for some to ask questions at a/the LQS if the fabrics weren't purchased there.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crqltr View Post
    I have laid blocks out on a flannel sheet then rolled them up they stay pretty good ...might help you to not lose your place every time you pack up.
    One could pin the pieces, too, for extra security, before rolling/folding up the sheet.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Stitch124's Avatar
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    I'm sure the LQS where I bought my fabric will be happy to answer any questions. I'm going on Friday to buy a large cutting mat using a 50% off coupon from Michaels and I also have $5 discount as a Rewards member so a $50 mat will only cost me $20!! That's been my hold up so far this week. I'm going to press the fabric and get everything ready this week. I'm also a knitter and I'm knitting my first sweater as well. I have the left front of the sweater almost done. Both projects are firsts for me. I love learning new skills, so I am excited about starting my first quilt. I've had the pattern and the fabric for months now, just needed to take my first quilting class to know the basics. Now that I've done that, I think I'm ok to start.

    Thanks for all the advice and encouragement.
    Last edited by Stitch124; 09-11-2012 at 05:31 AM.

  21. #21
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    just take it slow and easy. Don't rush each step and do small sections at the time.
    I tend to think we mess up when we get anxious and go too fast and try to accomplish too much.

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    Good luck. You can also lay your blocks out on a flannel backed vinly table cloth and roll it up. I find the vinyl backing doesn't stick to anything when you put the roll away. The blocks stay in place so it can be a "work in process" without losing your spot.

  23. #23
    Junior Member Newby0709's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xtgirl View Post
    You press it face down onto a paper bag. The wax transfers to the bag and the color remains
    I made a crayon throw for Grandpa and it certainly has many flaws but everyone loved making it. The grands were about 3, 4 and 5 years old.

  24. #24
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    I too had grand kids to stay with me for a while and little space to sew in, like the lady said about the flannel sheet.or use and table cloth ...bath towel (less space)...... alot of times I put small project in zip lock bag ( if piecing one project put all squares, rectanglees ,half triangles. long 2'1/2' strips in another ) then if you get interuped from the little ones you can roll up ,wrap up project and have it one piece . this work for me and I would tell stories to the little ones and like the lady said give them something to do to help you , they learn with out knowing it ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ............ hope this helps

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