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Thread: New to accuquilt -- input on applique technique

  1. #1
    RST
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    New to accuquilt -- input on applique technique

    I'm playing with my new-to-me accuquilt orange peel die cut and need some input. It looks like it's designed to be used primarily for fusible or raw edge applique-- not something I do much except for quick and throw-away projects. I'd like to make something a little more substantial using scraps from my stash, and I find myself unsure how to do this.

    If I do fusible, I think I'd window-pane it to reduce the stiffness, but I'm pondering how to do that -- add after die cutting the fabric? Try to add the flimsy fusible outline to the already cut fabric and then press? Gah!

    Then, if I use a blanket stitch to attach -- do I need a stabilizer or will the 2 layers of fabric (orange peel and background block) be substantial enough?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    here's a technique I've used. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tyAig7XupI
    using the GO die makes the quilt go much faster.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  3. #3
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    For windowpane-ing the fusible is going to be a bit fussy. I think I would just go with a featherweight fusible and press before you cut. You could also use a featherweight interfacing (fusible on only one side). Cut your orange peels, then sew them to the interfacing using an 1/8" seam. Right side of fabric to fusible (bumpy) side of interfacing. cut the interfacing to match the edge of the orange peel, and cut a slit. Turn. Now you have a prepared turned edge applique. If you want to window the interfacing a bit you can. Press in place. With any technique you use, you shouldn't need more stabilizer with a blanket stitch, but might need to ease up on the tension a bit. You can then window the background fabric if you'd like. You would need stabilizer if you satin stitched the applique in place.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I wouldn't window-pane for this. I'd use Misty Fuse on the back of the fabric before cutting. Misty Fuse is a super lightweight double-sided fusible. Iron the pieces on the background as usual for fusible applique, then use your blanket stitch (or straight stitch near the edge, or zigzag, or decorative stitch) to secure the edges.

    Regarding stabilization of the background fabric, what I do is *heavily* starch the background fabric before cutting. For this I use a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch and water. My method is to "paint" the starch onto yardage until it is saturated, wait a few minutes to allow the starch to penetrate the fibers, toss in the dryer, then iron with steam.

    However, if you are using a fusible, it may not be necessary to stabilize the background fabric with starch. I would try a block or two without the starch to see if you can get away without that step.

    For machine applique using freezer paper and turned under edges, I use the Accuquilt to cut the freezer paper shapes. It really cuts down on the time involved for this step. Only some of their shapes are useful for this purpose, but the orange peel would be one of them if you prefer turned-under edges.

  5. #5
    Senior Member tallchick's Avatar
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    Agree with Prisim about the Misty Fuse, it's amazing and very lightweight and easy to work with. I would go this route as well, I also just purchased the same die and it will be my next project. Can't wait to see your project!!!

    http://youtu.be/0xNZcN01FR0
    Lisa

  6. #6
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    That is the reason that I never have considered getting one of these cutting machines is that you are stuck with their dimensions. I am working on a flip flop quilt for charity and here is how I use Heat n Bond light.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

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    RST
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    I've been playing with my new toy and have come up with 29 different ways to applique using the orange peel die. I'd love to come up with a nice even 36 methods, a different approach for each block in the table runner I'm making as an experimental sampler. Maybe some additional ideas will come to me as I work through the 29 I've got so far ; )

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    RST
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    I just thought of 2 more methods in the time it took me to walk upstairs, so up to 32 methods of applique I can use, just need 4 more to satisfy this self-imposed goal. . .

  9. #9
    RST
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    And I'm now at 37 techniques. Though some feel a bit like cheating.

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    Senior Member ClairVoyantQuilter's Avatar
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    I've used Heat N Bond Lite for years but recently bought a bolt of Heat N Bond Featherweight and wow . . .I'm in love! It's the softest fusible ever and the appliqués feel so much softer.

    Enjoy your new GO and if you're active on Facebook, AccuQuilt and Beyond is a great group of talented and helpful quilters who can help get you over any humps you might encounter.
    Blessings,
    -Robin

    https://quiltedorchid.com

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    Super Member Bree123's Avatar
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    You should not need a stabilizer to blanket stitch. If you decide to satin stitch instead, then I would get a tear-away paper stabilizer for that... or a wash-away stabilizer would also work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RST View Post
    I've been playing with my new toy and have come up with 29 different ways to applique using the orange peel die. I'd love to come up with a nice even 36 methods, a different approach for each block in the table runner I'm making as an experimental sampler. Maybe some additional ideas will come to me as I work through the 29 I've got so far ; )
    Please explain 29+ ways to appliqué....or do you mean that many different design stitches to hold down????

  13. #13
    RST
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    Nope -- 29 different methods of applique, both hand and machine all of which use the die cut in some way. Only 3 or 4 different stitches from the machine count as different techniques, to my mind. While of course you could use any number of decorative machine stitches, in my categorizations, they would all be variations on blanket stitching.

    Some of my #'s 30-37 are not strictly applique, but are alternate uses for the orange peel die shape. I'm working through them and will blog my collection of ideas someday, maybe.

    I've been a quilter for a long time, and I've collected a whole bunch of techniques, some of them better than others for sure, but my sampler table topper will allow me to try them all out and see which I like best-- and also which hold up best under daily use and washing. If I get really organized, I may try a construction time estimate for comparison too.

    Thanks for the FB suggestion, Clairvoyantquilter-- neat group, with lots of good info.

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    Senior Member ClairVoyantQuilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ManiacQuilter2 View Post
    That is the reason that I never have considered getting one of these cutting machines is that you are stuck with their dimensions. I am working on a flip flop quilt for charity and here is how I use Heat n Bond light.
    Interesting idea . . .are the blocks shaped like flip flops or is the entire quilt in the shape of a flip flop?

    I understand what you mean about being stuck with the die dimensions. I was less than thrilled with my stock made stocking die so had one custom made. If you dsign it, they will make it . . .and now you can order dies for GO.
    Blessings,
    -Robin

    https://quiltedorchid.com

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    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    wow, I have no idea what you are talking about, but I am excited to see it. I hope you will share what you've come up with. Color me intrigued.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

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    I iron my fusible to the fabric before cutting out the applique design. Saves a lot of time and I use the zig-zag or blanket stitch to applique.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DebraK View Post
    here's a technique I've used. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tyAig7XupI
    using the GO die makes the quilt go much faster.
    I have both the template from MSQC for the orange peel as per tute, and also the die from GO. Unfortunately the die is designed for fusible application as per company...but if one wants to use as in MSQC tute the peel will be smaller by that 1/4" seam. I started the peel project using the template and fusible interfacing, so will finish it that way...but will use the die using fusible web application...not windowpane...applying on fabric piece, then cutting out die, although there will be waste..but it will have its place.......decorative more than useful.....I just thought of something- how about cutting the peel design from only the fusible, then ironing to fabric and then hand cutting out the design..more time consuming, but maybe more conservative of both fab and fusible?..

  18. #18
    RST
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    That's an idea, Geri, and not one of the 36 I came up with ; )

    In my mind, if I'm going to fuse, I'm going to take advantage of the speed and accuracy of the die cutting. The only way I would want to hand cut my fabrics is if I am going to be having a hand or invisible applique technique used. But I like thinking of all possible scenarios, because chances are, there is some situation in which a less common approach would be just the thing.

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