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Thread: New sewing machine that compares to a singer 201

  1. #1
    Member Joe C's Avatar
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    New sewing machine that compares to a singer 201

    Does anyone know of a new modern sewing machine with more stitches and a needle down feature that would be quiet and smooth like the Singer 201. Don't get me wrong I love the 201 just wish at times it had more of today's features. Well thank you much for your help.

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Eversewn 30 sewing machine might be what you want.

  3. #3
    Member Joe C's Avatar
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    Thank you I guess I should have added that the harp size be close to the 201 the Eversew is nice but the harp is to small for me.

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    My Babylock machines are my quiestest. Your best bet will be to go visit dealers and try them out for yourself.

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    Kind of like buying a car, try out different machines in your price range.

  6. #6
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    I like my Janome 6600. Large harp size, needle down, auto thread cut.

  7. #7
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    I have a Juki TL2010Q. It has a large harp, needle down, auto thread cut. But it's straight stitch only. I bought it for FMQ but it pieces very well too.

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    If you find one, please let me know, which one you decided on. I would love a needle down feature also. Nothing I've looked at (or tested in a shop) even comes close to my 201.

  9. #9
    Member Holly H NY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SusieQOH View Post
    I have a Juki TL2010Q. It has a large harp, needle down, auto thread cut. But it's straight stitch only. I bought it for FMQ but it pieces very well too.

    I've never sewn on a Singer 201, but I do know that the old Singers are well regarded for their solid, beautiful, even stitching. One of the big factors that creates that stitching is that the feed dogs are narrow as these are straight stitch only machines. I believe that once you move to a machine with more stitch options you will have wider feed dogs, and a different stitch. That is why I bought a Juki 2010q. As noted above, it has a large throat space, needle down, knee lift and a thread cutter. I keep my more entry level Janome around for the rare occasions that I need a blanket stitch, button hole, or zig zag stitch. I definitely don't like straight stitch on my Janome as much as I do on my Featherweight or Juki.

  10. #10
    Member Joe C's Avatar
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    Good stuff here, but to me the Juki is pretty much the 201 with a needle down function the 201 has a top loading bobbin which I prefer to the underside bobbin I have a 301 that has that underside bobbin which is ok, but . Well I think I have my answer and thank you all for your help. I don't think I'm going to be happy with any modern sewing machine really, but plan to try a few at the next quilt show I go to. I may just try to lean FMQ and that would solve the problem of getting a machine with more stitches as I only do cross hatch on my quilts now with the 201.

  11. #11
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SusieQOH View Post
    I have a Juki TL2010Q. It has a large harp, needle down, auto thread cut. But it's straight stitch only. I bought it for FMQ but it pieces very well too.
    I have the 2200 QVP Mini which is basically the same machine. I bought mine for FMQ also but I pieced a large string quilt on it and it's awesome for that also. Straight stitch only but has knee lift and auto thread cutter.
    Patrice S

    Bernina Artista 180, Singer 301a, Featherweight Centennial, Rocketeer, Juki 2200 QVP Mini, White 1964 Featherweight

  12. #12
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    Joe you're not going to find anything modern that can even come close to the 201. Nothing built today has that smooth, undescribeable feel of a well tuned 201-2.

    Cari

  13. #13
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
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    I'm going to be honest here, you won't find a new machine as good as a Singer 201. There are definitely some great new machines available, but none will still be humming along at 70+ years old. And with computer parts and mother boards and such in all new machines, even the Juki 2010Q, you will need to bring the machine in for a service, rather than doing it yourself.

    If you want a machine for fancy stitches, zigzag stitch, and needle down features, I'm sure there are some lovely machines out there that can do that. I use a simple Wal-Mart Brother, and now a vintage Pfaff 130 for applique. I just know that no plastic Brother machine will never be as nice as my vintage machines.
    We didn't realize we were making memories, we just knew we were having fun. ~ Winnie the Pooh ~

    1912 World's Rotary Treadle (White Company), 1942 Singer 66-16, 1952 Pfaff 130-6, 1954 Singer 15-91, 1956 Singer 201-2

  14. #14
    Member Joe C's Avatar
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    Cari I think you are correct. Nothing will come close.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe C View Post
    Cari I think you are correct. Nothing will come close.
    I'm not a Singer gal, half of my sewing machine herd are Brother machines but my 201-2 is the queen of my herd.

    Cari

  16. #16
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    My straight stitch only Babylock Jane and my Juki TL98QE do not have mother boards. Had them since 2008 and 2010, never been to a shop. Very easy to maintain them myself.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  17. #17
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    NZ- my Juki is all mechanical, no mother board.
    I have a 201 and love it too.

  18. #18
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
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    Okay, I stand corrected, the Juki 2010 doesn't have a mother board. Juki likes to sell it as a completely mechanical machine, but it does have an electronic "brain" so to speak (sorry not a computer wizz here!) that controls the thread cutter, needle down, and speed controller. One member here, Macybaby I believe it was, had that part go out on her couple year old Juki.
    We didn't realize we were making memories, we just knew we were having fun. ~ Winnie the Pooh ~

    1912 World's Rotary Treadle (White Company), 1942 Singer 66-16, 1952 Pfaff 130-6, 1954 Singer 15-91, 1956 Singer 201-2

  19. #19
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    I learned to sew on a 201 and currently own at least two of them.

    What most people fail to take into account is that was Singer's flagship at the time. It was not an inexpensive machine by any measure. So if you want to find a "comparable" machine nowdays - you'll be looking in the several thousand dollar range.

    When you buy a vintage machine and buy what was once the top of the line, it should be a very good machine within its design. If you buy a vintage machine that was low end when it came out - don't expect it to compare to a high end machine.

    I've been lucky to almost always have owned top of the line machines, starting with a 201, and moving up. When I started looking at machines a few years ago, I realized I'd not find anything that worked up to my standards and had extra features that was under about $5,000 new.

    Another note on vintage machines, if you want a good workhorse, find a machine that shows wear. The older machines were not produced with the fit and finish that can be achieved with current machining, so you want a machine that had lots of hours on it so it's well broken in. One of my favorites was a Singer 15-90 that came with a host of specialty attachments and had seen a lot of use. That machine was smoother than any other Singer I've sewn on - but I've sewn on many 15's I didn't like near as well, but they were in much nicer shape.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

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