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Thread: Not sure what to do

  1. #1
    Junior Member hsweany's Avatar
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    Not sure what to do

    I just took my crib size quilt from the washer and everywhere I had joined triangles is ripped open. I made the triangles by sewing two seams close to the diagonal center and then cutting. I guess I must have cut too close to the seam???? What can I do to fix this? Thanks for your help.
    Holly

  2. #2
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    I have not had this problem at all. Being accurate in cutting, sewing and trimming is key.
    Deb Watkins - I woke up today on the right side of dirt. It is a good day.

  3. #3
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
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    Could you post a pic? Not knowing what the top looks like I have some ideas but don't want to speak without seeing the problem and knowing the style of quilt.
    Joyce

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  4. #4
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    well it's a baby quilt, perhaps you could mend all the seams by doing a zig zag over them. or a double line of zig zags to be certain to catch both sides of the fabrics in the seam area. Good luck!!

  5. #5
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
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    You should draw a line diagonally and then sew 1/4 inch away from either side of the line. then cut down the line. i am not sure why your seams came apart. I am sorry that happened after all the time you put into the quilt. If you can post a picture or describe in greater detail, perhaps we can help more.

  6. #6
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    You might could put a little wonder under on it and iron it down. But, I've never had this problem before. You might even try a little blind whip stitch by hand.
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  7. #7
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    Did you use a longer stitch when sewing these seams? Diagonal seams need a tighter stitch length. They may be able to be mended by adding some trim along the bad seam.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  8. #8
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    I had this happen once on a pinwheel quilt. And thankfully it only happened in one seam!!! I wound up taking out the damaged triangle and handsewing in a replacement. I'm pretty sure it happened because when I cut my squares apart, I must have cut less than 1/4" for this particular block. It is the only thing I can think of because this quilt was alot of HST and I only had one seam fail.

    The first picture is the blown seam and the the third picture is the same block after my repair
    Attached Images Attached Images


    Last edited by auntpiggylpn; 05-28-2012 at 06:24 PM.
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  9. #9
    Super Member LynnVT's Avatar
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    Good that it happened when you washed it, and not afterward when you gave it to the mom. She'd probably be embarrased to tell you, and you'd feel bad if you found out about it. I agree, best to use smaller stitch for diagonals especially. Could be just that particular fabric was loosly woven, and seam allowance was a bit small. Sure is a cheery quilt, though.
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  10. #10
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    You need to show a picture. I think (without seeing it) that you have but 2 choices of repair types. Remove the fabric with the bad seams and replace, or mend the seams from the top. If the pattern is such that you can applique something on top of the seams - even strips of seam binding tape or narrow sashing- in a color that will enhance your color scheme I would probably select that repair from the top method and sew through the whole quilt. It would in effect quilt the quilt while stitching the new fabric down. Since it is a child's quilt, might it be possible to select applique

    shapes appropriate to childhood to cover the seams? Maybe a bad suggestion since I can't see the number or size of the frayed seams.

  11. #11
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    Is the quilt top pattern something that you could add trim to all the seams? I would use a strip of Wonderunder under the split seams and iron them back in place. Then if the pattern permitted, I would buy the Jumbo rick rack for stitching over the seams.

  12. #12
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    you said you sewed close to your diagonal line- then cut---that is where you went wrong- you are supposed to sew 1/4" away from the diagonal line on each side of it- then cut on the line- so you have 1/4" seam allowance on each piece-
    if the fabric is not too frayed you could first iron the quilt- getting everything lined up as close as possible- nice & neat-flat- then either using a zig-zag or other decorative stitch sew each one back down- making sure your stitch is wide enough to securily attach both sides... consider it a 'design element' you could use a contrasting thread- or a veregated thread and it would look as if you made it that way on purpose. l
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  13. #13
    Junior Member hsweany's Avatar
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    I think I've got it fixed. I used one of my "pretty" stitches and went over every dividing line. I thought I was pretty careful with my cutting and seams, but I guess not. Thanks for your help. This quilt is going to a children's hospital. Our church makes quilts all year and then takes them to Riley once a year.
    Holly

  14. #14
    Super Member Charleen DiSante's Avatar
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    That's great that you have figured out how to salvage it! It is so neat to see these quilts being given to the charities. I work in a homeless shelter and see some really interesting quilts come through. Recently our new LQS had a charity pillowcase making day and our shelter received many of them. I didn't know, when I was working on them, that they were going to give us some. Neat surprise! Thanks to everyone out there that contributes to these comforting gifts.
    Charlie DiSante

  15. #15
    Super Member willferg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LynnVT View Post
    Good that it happened when you washed it, and not afterward when you gave it to the mom. She'd probably be embarrased to tell you, and you'd feel bad if you found out about it. I agree, best to use smaller stitch for diagonals especially. Could be just that particular fabric was loosly woven, and seam allowance was a bit small. Sure is a cheery quilt, though.
    You are right, it was good that the original poster was able to catch this in time. I'm glad this problem was posted, for the benefit of us all. I work with Project Linus, and we received three baby blankets that had just the same problem -- seams ripped out and no seam allowance to allow for repair. I feel so bad for the quilter who made these but have no way to let her know. They were very cute blankets but unusable. Some PL members took them and are trying to remedy them...
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  16. #16
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    I'd try the wonderunder to hold it but then I'd do some more decorative stitches or zigzags to hold it.

  17. #17
    Super Member Sandra-P's Avatar
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    I am so sorry this happened to your sweet quilt. Not sure what the answer is to fix it. I usually will wash my quilt top first before quilting as this has happened to me before too. Then it was easy to go back over the parts that ripped out and resew them.
    Sandra

  18. #18
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    This happened with me once and it was because when I cut to triangles apart there was not enough seam left.
    Apparently I am not adept at doing this method. I poked the fabric down as much as I could and just whip stitched those place. It has been a year now and it is still holding. My daughter washes baby quilts a lot so it must work.
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  19. #19
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Glad you could mend your quilt. For next time, try starting with slightly larger squares and sewing a generous quarter inch from your drawn line. Then cut apart and trim the HSTs to the right size. An ounce of prevention and no blown seams.
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  20. #20
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    I am glad you were able to fix it...and sounds like using decorative stitches was a perfect way to do that! Good for you and your church making the quilts to donate to the children's hospital!


    Quote Originally Posted by hsweany View Post
    I think I've got it fixed. I used one of my "pretty" stitches and went over every dividing line. I thought I was pretty careful with my cutting and seams, but I guess not. Thanks for your help. This quilt is going to a children's hospital. Our church makes quilts all year and then takes them to Riley once a year.

  21. #21
    Junior Member SandyQuilter's Avatar
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    Could be one of two problems.
    Not 1/4 inch seams
    Poor quality fabric that frayed when washed.

    Potential answer
    Make bias tape strips and sew over all seams to encase the troubled seams. Though you do not have to use bias strips, it can be cut on the straight-of-grain.
    SandyQulter

  22. #22
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    If it were me, I'd get some of the scraps, cut and fuse a circle ( or a layered circle) overtop the area that frayed, and then appliqué it down. I'd machine appliqué, but you could do it by hand if you like. I think the colors and quilt would look fine with a few playful circles! Call it a "design decision"!

  23. #23
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    Bot seeing a picture, could you use wide rick-rack and sew down both sides of the seam?

  24. #24
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    Glad you were able to repair it easily. I've had problems when I make hst by sewing and cutting apart. I usually catch the ones that don't have enough seem before I put then into a project.

    In the beginning of my quilting career, I had that happen alot because I wasn't very good with my 1/4" seem. Fortunately all my quilts went to family members who had no problems bringing it back to me for repairs. I'm much better now.

  25. #25
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    Is it already quilted? Washing just the top can cause this to happen, no matter how careful with seam allowances you are.

    Not seeing the quilt...my first thought is 1/4" or 1/2" ribbon...Use Steam a seam (it's got a slight sticky on it, so sticks to the ribbon and quilt before you press it with the iron. ...once you have all the seams covered (I would use long strips of ribbon, and just crosshatch them following the seams) and ironed down.. stitch down both edges of the ribbon to secure it. You could also use flat lace, and even just the decorative stitches on your machine...honeycomb stitch, etc.
    Quote Originally Posted by hsweany View Post
    I just took my crib size quilt from the washer and everywhere I had joined triangles is ripped open. I made the triangles by sewing two seams close to the diagonal center and then cutting. I guess I must have cut too close to the seam???? What can I do to fix this? Thanks for your help.
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