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Thread: Piecing a Backing

  1. #1
    Senior Member pstoner's Avatar
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    Ok I need help with piecing a backing, I purchased what should have been large enough for a large queen size backing with extra and when the LQS cut it, she got distracted and shorted me 12 inches. She is trying to make it right, by sending me an additional 2 yards (all she had left of this fabric), and I can't locate any more of the fabric at any other LQS's. (It's a batik, by Hoffman).

    So what I have is 2 pieces WOF x 96, 1 piece WOF by 88" and 1 piece by WOF x 72"

    If I go WOF x 32" on the larger two pieces, I can get 3 each and WOF x 32 on the other one I can get 2. I should be able to get WOF by 32 on the piece she is sending me, but with seam allowances I would be very tight by the time it is machine quilted as to the width of the quilt. The top measures 94" x 112". Is this possible for this size of top, I really didn't want to have to spend another weekend trying to find something else suitable for the color selection as I have also purchased coordinating thread.

    I am not using any of the backing material to make the binding, I have strips from the material on the front of the quilt for this.

    Please help all advice is greatly appreciated, and I know this is technically not the way the back should be pieced.

    Thanks
    Patti

  2. #2
    Super Member AgapeStitches's Avatar
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    If I understand your measurements correctly you should be able to do it this way and end up with 9 rectangles (wof x 32) this would be great for the back. Have fun and can't wait to see the pic when you're finished.

  3. #3
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    I think I'd cut the three large pieces all to the same length - 88". Then I'd take the 72" piece and cut strips 16"xWOF. Add a 16" strip to the "top" of the first large piece, another to the "bottom" of the second large piece, and another to the "top" of the third large piece. That will give you three pieces that are approximately WOF x 103". Sew each of those three pieces together along the selvage edge, and you'll end up with a backing piece that is approximately 103"x120", plenty big enough for a 94"x112" top.

    Good luck!

  4. #4
    Senior Member pstoner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EIQuilter
    I think I'd cut the three large pieces all to the same length - 88". Then I'd take the 72" piece and cut strips 16"xWOF. Add a 16" strip to the "top" of the first large piece, another to the "bottom" of the second large piece, and another to the "top" of the third large piece. That will give you three pieces that are approximately WOF x 103". Sew each of those three pieces together along the selvage edge, and you'll end up with a backing piece that is approximately 103"x120", plenty big enough for a 94"x112" top.

    Good luck!
    This won't look funny or weird?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by pstoner
    Quote Originally Posted by EIQuilter
    I think I'd cut the three large pieces all to the same length - 88". Then I'd take the 72" piece and cut strips 16"xWOF. Add a 16" strip to the "top" of the first large piece, another to the "bottom" of the second large piece, and another to the "top" of the third large piece. That will give you three pieces that are approximately WOF x 103". Sew each of those three pieces together along the selvage edge, and you'll end up with a backing piece that is approximately 103"x120", plenty big enough for a 94"x112" top.

    Good luck!


    This won't look funny or weird?
    I don't think so, but I can see that it might not be in everyone's comfort zone to do it this way. My goal was trying to avoid too many seams coming together at one place and creating a thick place for the needle to penetrate when quilting.

  6. #6
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    Hi,

    Go to the site for John Flynn quilting frames. He has a whole write up for piecing your back. He explains why you should not necessarily put a seam down the middle of your quilt. Saving fabric is one good reason to use this method. Also it helps when storing the quilt. He works through all the math, so just follow it step by step for your situation.

    It can be found here:

    add: http://

    to: flynnquilt.com/workshop/FreeLessons/

    see: Diagonal Pieced Back

    Can't put it all together as a link or will lose the message.

    Hope this helps.

    Pam M

  7. #7
    Senior Member darlin121's Avatar
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    I can't help you with piecing the back but I just had to comment that I love all the brainey math people out there!

  8. #8
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    Hi Patti,

    You might also think about adding a topper section to the back of your quilt. It is a section of matching blocks or fabric that co-ordinate with the top so that it can be turned down on the bed and look nice.

    This would help with the amount of fabric needed for the back as you would not need as much. I would still use the diagonal piecing method for the back.

    Pam M

  9. #9
    Senior Member pstoner's Avatar
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    Ok perhaps that I am missing something when reading his instructions "method for diagonally piecing a quilt back from one peice of fabric, is the most efficient way to make the back whenever the width of the quilt back is one and a half times or less than the width of the fabric you plan to use. If the width of your back fabric is 44", use Joh's metod whenerve the width you want your back is 66" or less"

    My back needs to be 96" or wider.

    and my wof is 45".

    Go to the site for John Flynn quilting frames. He has a whole write up for piecing your back. He explains why you should not necessarily put a seam down the middle of your quilt. Saving fabric is one good reason to use this method. Also it helps when storing the quilt. He works through all the math, so just follow it step by step for your situation.

    It can be found here:

    add: http://

    to: flynnquilt.com/workshop/FreeLessons/

    see: Diagonal Pieced Back

    Can't put it all together as a link or will lose the message.

    Hope this helps.

    Pam M[/quote]

  10. #10
    Senior Member pstoner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milp04
    Hi Patti,

    You might also think about adding a topper section to the back of your quilt. It is a section of matching blocks or fabric that co-ordinate with the top so that it can be turned down on the bed and look nice.

    This would help with the amount of fabric needed for the back as you would not need as much. I would still use the diagonal piecing method for the back.

    Pam M
    That's a great idea, but that won't work for me either, I don't have enough of the front material left to make 12-16" blocks to make the back long enough, I really like this idea though and if it's ok with you I will put this into my file of tips for my next project.

  11. #11
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EIQuilter
    My goal was trying to avoid too many seams coming together at one place and creating a thick place for the needle to penetrate when quilting.
    This is a really good and simple solution! :thumbup:

    Next time I have a backing quandary, I'm going to message you. :mrgreen:

  12. #12
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    Would you consider adding other fabric or blocks to your back for aesthetic purposes? I know you have enough fabric for your backing but this would create an interest on the back.

    I wish I had more pictures, but can't find them right now. So here is one of Carrie Nelson's quilts. She is the creator of Miss Rosie's Quilts Co. She may have samples on her website.?.

    ali

  13. #13
    Senior Member pstoner's Avatar
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    I think that this is my best option, I tried the John Flynn method on paper, and am not sure that I like it that way. I think I will your suggestion, even though it's not how I have "always" done things, it's ok to step out of the box. I was afraid that it wouldn't look nice with these "pieces" added.

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