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Thread: poverty induced guilt.

  1. #26
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    Aileen, I have made a few quilts after looking at pictures in magazines for inspiration. What I find happens is that I use the idea as inspiration, then 'make it my own'. In the end it doesn't look anything like the picture that inspired it.

    My guess is that if you hunted long enough on the internet, you would find a very similar quilt with directions you can download, sometimes for free!

    I agree with the others - as long as you don't plan to sell it to anyone, use it.

  2. #27
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    My suggestion - remember this incident and pay it forward someday. When you have your Phd and are rolling in the bucks, buy this book or something else from this author and give it someone who is just starting out and is quilting. I'm sure you will find lots of folks who think it is just fine to hijack a pattern, but I have to give you so many kudos for not having a "too bad for you" attitude! Good luck to you, and keep your fine 'compass'!

  3. #28
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArtsyOne View Post
    I've just finished reading a book about knitting (Sweater Quest by Adrienne Martini) in which the issue of copywriting and ownership of patterns is discussed at length. The following paragraph will help the OP assuage her guilt and let her think of herself as an artist: "Is knitting art or is knitting crafts? ..... If you buy a pattern and buy the yarn the pattern suggests and knit it in the color suggested, you're executing someone else's directions, no matter how much joy you do it with; that's craft. That's execution. The definition of art for human beings is that it is self-expression. So the minute that you say, "I think the sleeves should be a little bit shorter," "I think this should be green", the minute that who you are begins to influence what that thing is, now it's art."
    I have to disagree with the quote. Do you think if anyone who plays Mozart or Beethoven exactly as the composer intended is not an artist? Of course they are! Anyone who completes a pattern and it ends up like its supposed to, is an artist. If you change it - it's creative interpretation.

  4. #29
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    When our children were small, we had NO money. I spent a lot of time at the local Library getting free patterns for toys and dolls. The children were happy with them, they were made from scrap fabric and free pattens and all was well. Things changed later, but you do what you have to do for your family. People are in a bind and have to cut back and save money in this economy. Nothing to feel quilty about. Enjoy. Hope your phd goes well also.

  5. #30
    Super Member k9dancer's Avatar
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    Quilters have been inspired by each other's work since the beginning. That's how this art/craft began. I don't see how one can truly copy a quilt unless it comes from a kit which has all the fabrics pre-cut.
    I have a large library of quilt books. I frequently refer to them for inspiration. While I may use a block that I find in one, I have never made a copy of a quilt.
    I have taught a number of people to quilt. While we have referred to quilts or blocks in a book, no one has ever made an exact copy.
    Even if someone were to make an exact copy of one of my quilts, I would be flattered and amazed at her ability to find all those fabrics.
    As even the book referenced had no pattern, the quilt was obviously included for inspiration. Other than looking at the photo, what more is there to do? Anything that arises from viewing the photo would have to come from the maker.
    Let's say, for example, that the photo is of a quilt which features a tree with falling leaves. There will be a sky background, some ground cover in the foreground, and perhaps some rolling hills fading into the sky. Based on just this description, there are many ways to construct this image. I'm sure that in reading it, you have constructed a mind's eye view of your colors, layout, and maybe even fabrics. Yet each of us will have seen a different image, and in the making of it, may come out with something different from our original concept. Is any of this cheating or stealing? I say no. I have merely given you an idea, and ideas cannot be copyrighted. So, if any of you wish to make a quilt based on my idea, I say, "Go for it!" I'll even start a new thread where we can post photos of our results. Who's up for it?
    Stephanie in Mena

  6. #31
    KLO
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    I belong to a small quilt group and a guild. The guild has a library from which a member can borrow any book. My small group shares books among themselves all the time. I too feel a little tinge of something when I borrow the books even if they are from the main local library. But the libraries did have to buy the books to have on hand so at least that was another book sold. Some of the borrowed books inspire me to find other books/patterns by that author and buy them which I wouldn't have know about otherwise. How about ebay? Used patterns/books are sold all the time there and the originator of said book/pattern is not getting anything back from that sale. If I were a book/pattern designer I would be upset about all if this I think but what can one do about it?

    Life is complicated and we live in a capitalistic society. Once you have bought something with your hard earned money, it is yours to do with as you please .... sell, give away, throw away, etc.

    Oh and has anyone noticed how close the word "quilt" and "guilt" are? Yes, I too feel guilty some if I borrow a book from a friend but at least one copy was sold and I was not going to buy it anyway. This is definitely a touchy and complicated discussion.
    Last edited by KLO; 10-21-2012 at 10:39 AM.

  7. #32
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    I think that rather than feel guilty, you should pat yourself on the back for being sensible with your money, celebrate your ability to solve problems creatively and enjoy the process and accomplishment of quilting with a robust happy dance! No more mea culpas please!

  8. #33
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    Don't worry about it! Our foremothers borrowed, exchanged, and designed quilts for all to enjoy. We have all gotten paranoid about patterns and designs. My suggestion is to learn to draft your own patterns and then they will be your own. Have fun. That's the name of the game.

  9. #34
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    I would just try to give the quilt shop some business as soon as you are able. As for the book author, you are benefiting from her ideas, so like someone else said, be sure to give her name and the name of the book when you post your pictures online. That may help by causing someone else to buy the book, at least.

    I understand your guilt. Creative people should be paid for their work, just like anyone else.
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  10. #35
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    Many of the quilts that I've seen in books seem to be based on quilts/patterns that the book author saw 'someplace else.'

    Where does 'public domain' end and 'copyright' begin"

    I still don't understand how the author of the Dear Jane book - who DID NOT MAKE THE QUILT -and as far as I know - does not own it - can profit from it or prevent others from using the quilt for inspiration for OTHER books based on the quilt by Jane A. Stickles.

  11. #36
    Senior Member captlynhall's Avatar
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    IMHO, making a quilt you found in a book or magazine for your own personal use it allowed, otherwise, why would they be published for you to see? If you will be displaying or entering it in a show or contest, then by all means, give credit where credit is due. Things change completely if you are making to sell. Then you must be attentive to copy right and design infringement.

    That said, I get most all my inspiration from books checked out at the library, or from free you tube videos. If I see a pattern that really grabs by attention, then I will buy it, but so far have not used any of the patterns I have bought. A lot of 'patterns' I have seen, are really just creative fiddling with the old time public domain patterns anyway. The art quilters are so far advanced beyond my capabilities, that I not only would not be able to replicate their work from memory, but doubt I could do it following a pattern either. So no worries there.
    When a dying man asked his pastor "How long does it take to die?" his pastor's heartfelt reply was "A lifetime." Live life to the fullest, but stop now and then to enjoy the sunset.
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  12. #37
    Super Member k9dancer's Avatar
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    Those that are interested may please visit my QB thread "Falling Leaves Quilt Challenge." I'd love to see what that means to you.
    Stephanie in Mena

  13. #38
    Dee
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    You don't have to carry around any guilt. Be happy and happy quilting.

  14. #39
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    Many people are cutting back due to prices and income. Do what you can and don't apologize.

  15. #40
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    OK, here is a list of "why you should not feel guilty".
    1. Libraries - both public and quilt guild libraries someone did pay for every single book with the express intention of lending them out to people who would most likely not buy them. Also, every best selling author knows that his/her work will be enjoyed by many people who have borrowed - rather than bought - the book. I think they are OK with that, too.
    2. There are many of us who buy a quilting book and never make a single item in it. We just love looking at the book - maybe only once or twice. We've made up for all of those "library" users. Case in point, I own every single book put out by Kumiko Sudo because I think they are gorgeous feasts for the eye.
    3. Truth be told, the only quilts that a lot of us need a pattern for are the "art" variety. I happen to be a "math type" with color sense who can draft patterns, change sizes, etc. so a pattern is unnecessary.
    4. Jenny at Missouri Star Quilt Co. is my hero! Love that woman's YouTube tutorials!!!!! All free information.
    5. If you display it, make sure there is a label giving credit to your "design inspiration". It's all good.

    Quote Originally Posted by stillclock View Post
    when i posted the other day about "manly quilts", someone suggested cherri house's very wonderful city quilts book.

    so i went and previewed the book on amazon, fell in love with one of the patterns via google image search and then rode over to the local quilt shop who has it in stock.

    i looked up the pattern and there is no specific layout, no real pattern and a very well established technique in my skill set.

    i'm a phd student with a child. $25 for a book i will only use for one pattern (which isn't really a pattern at all but rather a design idea....) is too much. so i didn't buy it. and i feel guilty because cherri house did a fantastic job, and so does that little quilt shop and well....

    i'm going to make that quilt and no one is going to make any money for their time, effort or labour to help me make that quilt. and for that i am truly sorry.

    aileen

  16. #41
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    i believe that if you have seen something you like, and made something based on it, it is correct to attribute it to them as "inspired by ..........", if you put it on display. i have an online artisan friend who makes wonderful coats and sweaters from recycled/upcycled goods. she has inspired many to copy her, and has released her "real" pattern for others to purchase and use--but even before then, she only asked for attribution when displayed or sold. ultimately, if it is your work, your color sense, your "eye" that made it without the actual pattern, it is your art, with inspiration and visual encouragement. enjoy your god-given abilities!
    "life is a banquet, and most poor fools are out there, starving to death!"--"auntie mame"

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