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Pros and Cons of Using Two Layers of Batting

Pros and Cons of Using Two Layers of Batting

Old 03-22-2015, 08:37 AM
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Default Pros and Cons of Using Two Layers of Batting

I would like opinions from those who have used two layers of batting. Was it more difficult to quilt? Why did you use two layers instead of one? Did you like the result of two layers? Why, why not? What types of batting did you use? Was the quilt "soft" or "stiff"? I am considering using two layers for the puffiness effect but I also want a soft, drapable quilt The quilt top in question is a "French Roses". Any suggestions appreciated.
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Old 03-22-2015, 09:14 AM
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I have used two layers of warm and natural white. It quilted easily - I did not notice any difference there. It is much heavier and a bit stiffer in terms of drape. The reason I tried it was that I wanted the quilt to be much warmer than a single layer of warm and natural would have been. I would not choose to do it this way again because of the stiffness. I quilted it with a medium to large meander so the quilting is not the reason for the stiffness. Also, there is not any extra puffiness on my quilt. I would go with a extra high loft batting with no tight quilting if you want puffiness and soft drape.
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Old 03-22-2015, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by kplumbridge View Post
I have used two layers of warm and natural white. It quilted easily - I did not notice any difference there. It is much heavier and a bit stiffer in terms of drape. The reason I tried it was that I wanted the quilt to be much warmer than a single layer of warm and natural would have been. I would not choose to do it this way again because of the stiffness. I quilted it with a medium to large meander so the quilting is not the reason for the stiffness. Also, there is not any extra puffiness on my quilt. I would go with a extra high loft batting with no tight quilting if you want puffiness and soft drape.
Did the quilt soften up any with washing?
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Old 03-22-2015, 09:33 AM
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I wouldn't force two layers of batting on my older Bernina. Depends if you have the type of machine that can handle the thickness.
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Old 03-22-2015, 09:49 AM
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I think long armers are using two completely different types of batting (and I've seen a lot of mixes) to get better destination to their quilting stitches.
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Old 03-22-2015, 09:52 AM
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if you have a long arm machine then 2 batts are not a problem. I quilt on my sewing machine so one batt is all I can do.
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Old 03-22-2015, 10:34 AM
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Longarm quilters sometimes use (2) layered battings { often a cotton and a wool} to show- highlight their quilting. Using 2 battings really enhances the stitching - ( will also help any mistake jump right out at you!) If you just want loft buy one batting with higher loft.... There are many options. If you are a terrific quilter wanting to showcase your stitches for a show by all means layer a couple batts... If you have a longarm....much more difficult to quilt with a domestic sewing machine.
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Old 03-22-2015, 10:36 AM
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I,m so glad to read this post because I did this last week and will never try to free motion
again using two layers again. I did mostly straight lines with a walking foot, which was no
problem. Then I tried to do feathers on the borders and should have stopped when I saw
how they looked, (awful). When I finished, I was so disappointed about the way it looked.
I knew that since this was a gift, I had to rip it out. It took me ten hours to do it and vowed
NEVER to try this again on two layers. I guess the saying "live and learn" very much applies
in this situation.
Oh and I used warm and natural batting.
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Old 03-22-2015, 12:29 PM
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I used two layers of warm and natural in my fireplace covering quilt. Our fireplace isn't used, and gets pretty drafty. I did echo, diagonal, and SITD, and a little free motion, and had no problem doing it on my Singer. It's about 36 x 42. It's a little stiffer, but that's what I wanted.
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Old 03-22-2015, 01:01 PM
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I longarm quilt and use two layers of batting quite often. I usually mix with a "denser" bat on the bottom, like W&N or Hobbs 80/20 QD cotton and once I did a wool army blanket. The top batting I use the loftier batt. I have used wool on top and also Hobbs polydown. I would not attempt doing this on a sit down set up be it a domestic or one of the larger harp sit downs like an HQ16. I just can't imagine trying to manipulate that kind of weight and bulk around. On a rack I don't have to worry about weight, bulk or shifting of all the layers.

Pros: Great definition to the quilting. Really makes it show. Quilt is super warm.

Cons: Quilt is much heavier weight wise.

Drape I have found really varies with the size of the quilt. Most bed size quilts I have done with two layers still drape on the bed very nicely and are not stiff, but this is really a matter of opinion. What one person thinks is stiff another person may not. I have found that smaller pieces like wall hangings are stiffer but given that the size is smaller what is there to drape? The stiffest was the one I did with a wool army blanket. That quilt lays on top of my bed in winter and I have it hanging the rest of the year. It is super warm but is also not real cuddly but that is ok with me because the quit is still very beautiful and very functional.
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