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Thread: putting the quilt top and back together

  1. #26
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Spray basting for me, but it helps a *lot* to know a few tips before you start. Such as, mark the centers of the sides of your backing, batting and top; really helps when lining them up. After lining up batting on top of backing, fold back the batting and spray baste just one-half at a time.

    If overspray is a concern, tape down the largest flat sheet you have first, to catch overspray. Afterwards toss this sheet in the laundry.

  2. #27
    Super Member Edie's Avatar
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    I have a long table and put on the backing, the batting and the top. I start out dead center and very gently, but firmly, push the fabric to all four sides as I prepare to pin; pin down the center block and go to the one on top of that one and then the one underneath the center block, and then to the sides, each time gently, but firmly pushing the fabric to the corners, so you end up doing the four corners of the quilt last. And last but not least, check to make sure that the bottom is nice and straight. It is time consuming, but I really enjoy this part of the quilting. It has become "The Challenge"!!!!!! I use this method when I tie down a quilt and as I finish each block (sewing the blocks in the same order as I pinned them down), I remove the pins and put them back in the Oxy-Clean container (My mom gave me her pins and I don't have the heart to put them in anything else), Also, for what it is worth, I would rather take the time to close the pins as I take them off the quilt.....Fons and Porter would disagree with me, but when I am concentrating on one thing, I cannot worry if the pins are open and are going to impale me to the living room wall!!!!!. I would much rather take the second or so to unhook the pin and use it and then rehook the pin when I am done! Just a thought here from me, who can't even take clothes out of the dryer without throwing my back out! No walking, no exercising, just probably laying on the floor on my back all day!!!!! Fun and games around here all the time! Edie
    Home is where the rags of your life are turned into quilts, lemons become lemonade and a few extra pounds are simply welcomed as "more of you to love."
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  3. #28
    Super Member carrieg's Avatar
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    I pin baste, using the curved safety pins. It helps to use the Kwick Clip to close the pins, makes it easier on your fingers!

    I have a cutting table I open up wide and I use binder clips to clip the sandwich to the table. The table edge is about 1", so the clips work pretty good. Usually can only do 1 side at a time.
    Carol in Michigan

  4. #29
    Member HLFrye's Avatar
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    For smaller quilts I will use the spray, but for my bigger quilts I use curved safety pins

  5. #30
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
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    I use pins and/or needle and thread. I don't like to have to mess with pins in a hoop. But for something small I will pin it. Otherwise, I use a needle and thread and baste it.

  6. #31
    Super Member LindaMRB's Avatar
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    I am not particularly a seasoned quilter and I quilt by hand.

    I pin the dickens out of it and then I baste like crazy. I baste it on the floor so the hardwood lets me know when I am through all 3 layers.
    Two reasons for basting: I had a couple pins tear a quilt once (an old top I was finishing) and I find the pins invariably grab my thread and slow down my hand quilting.
    And it is so much fun to pull the basting out as I go (you have to plan the basting to do this) ... my kids actually ask to have that task. It's like crossing out items on a to-do list!

  7. #32
    Member JReadman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishrose View Post
    I did this for the first time yesterday only I used pins instead of a needle and thread. It is as smooth as can be. It was an experience as her video shows a small sample and I had a 81" quilt and a queen size batt. The next one will go much faster, I'm sure, but it was a pleasure to be able to sandwich a quilt at home without using the floor.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyaLs...6&feature=plcp
    Same here - tried this for the first time last week on a crib quilt & used pins instead of hand-basting. It is an amazingly simple technique that REALLY works ~ even for a newbie!
    “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
    The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

    ~ Dr. Seuss

  8. #33
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    Safety pins work the best for me. I can't use the spray as I have asthma.
    Linda Wedge White

    I believe UFOs are like scraps, ferns and dust bunnies. Once you get two, they send spores out into the air and more just happen anywhere the spores meet.

  9. #34
    Senior Member Delilah's Avatar
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    I have spray basted over 150 quilts, either my own or helped with my friends. We have a super easy technique. Cover my king bed with a big flannel sheet, put batting down and arrange backing on that, fold back half of backing, spray batting and smooth backing back down. Fold back other half, spray and smooth. Flip it over so batting is on top, arrange quilt top and continue the fold back, spraying, smooth technique. Walk away and leave it for 30 minutes or so and it's ready to go.

    I was using June Taylor with great results, then they changed to a different formula and it was HORRIBLE. After emailing them they were great and have now changed their formula again. The new formula is in the new style can that tapers down on the top with a small cap but be sure that it says "Improved Formula" in dark pink or red on the front. The formula is pretty much the same as 505 and Dritz and I really like it. I don't like the Sullivan's in the pink can though.
    OCD in the OC

  10. #35
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    I've only done a few quilts, mostly baby/crib size, and have done most of them with spray basting. It's the best! Nothing moves arounds or shifts & I can do any kind of quilting I want to without stopping to remove pins. I put the back down, then the batting & smooth them both really well. Then I fold back the batting about half way, spray onto the backing, about 1/4 of the area, and then smooth the backing onto that area, working from the center to the edges. Repeat with the second 1/4 of the batting for that end. Then do the other half the same way. Gives a nice smooth finish, everything stays in place while you sew & it looks great when done. Especially helpful with a minkee backing since it's so stretchy. :-)

  11. #36
    Super Member grandme26's Avatar
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    I use the spray basting and have had no problems with it.
    Grandmeto6 aka Judy

  12. #37
    Power Poster solstice3's Avatar
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    The only one I have hand quilted to date, I baisted before quilting

  13. #38
    Senior Member jarenie's Avatar
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    For my small quilts 'Spray Bast' for the larger ones 'Spray Bast and pin"

  14. #39
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    I make several charity quilts each month, none of them larger than twin size. I have a large flannel backed plastic tablecloth pinned to the wall. I pin the backing to that, spray with basting spray LIGHTLY, then smooth the batting on. Spray the batting LIGHTLY and smooth the quilt top over that. I used to put them together using a large table but tried the wall after reading about it somewhere on this board. Whoever posted that idea, thank you, thank you, thank you.

  15. #40
    Super Member fred singer's Avatar
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    I use the spray adhesive for real small ones I have used "the birthing technique "
    Pegg


    Have a great day and happy sewing !

  16. #41
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    I pin baste with curved safety pins when I am machine quilting, and thread baste when I am hand quilting.
    Never tried the basting spray, but I did try a temporary fusible batting once...absolutely HATED it!

  17. #42
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    I use the curved quilter's safety pins for basting my quilts. All of the spray adhesives are a bad idea for asthmatics, so I avoid those.

  18. #43
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    Over the years I have tried Basting, Pinning and Spraying. Now I use a little of each. I spray bast the bigger quilts and now am getting the spray about right. Was way over spraying to start, I had to make sure it will stick right - wrong. Too much spray gooed up my needle, now I have it right. I always add a small few pins around the edges and if it is a busy border than I hand baste it as well to help it keep it's shape and stop any seams becoming less stable while I quilt on my little faithful Janome.
    Merivale
    Australia.

  19. #44
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joy.lynn View Post
    If your back is puckering, try starching it. I starch backing quite heavily, and no puckers. Works for flannel too.

    This is just the tip I need. Thanks for mentioning it. I make baby/lap quilts and use 505 spray basting. I love it and plan to stay with it. I've had absolutely no slipping of the layers.
    jean

  20. #45
    Super Member QandE2010's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    When I discovered spray basting.. it completely changed my quilting life! It seemed no matter how many pins , how much I ironed/pressed , no matter how careful I was making the sandwich...... I always ended up with PUCKERS! But with spray basting .... my dreams of puckerless quilting came true!
    Lori, I do believe we now have a new word to add to our quilting vocabulary: "puckerless ". I laughed so hard tears ran down my leg. BTW, I spray baste, too.
    Alma
    Nami to 6

  21. #46
    Junior Member paintbug's Avatar
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    good tip , thanks
    http://community.webshots.com/user/paintbug

  22. #47
    Junior Member paintbug's Avatar
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    hmmm, Something to check out!
    http://community.webshots.com/user/paintbug

  23. #48
    Junior Member paintbug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptquilts View Post
    I baste with thread, usually 8 pieces and maybe a few extra on the edges. HOWEVER, I am hand quilting, I understand you need to be much fussier for machine quilting. Any wrinkles on the back I can deal with as I move my hoop.

    ETA - I have used basting spray many years ago but was scared off by all the warnings on the label about cancer etc. Has it changed since then?
    Thanks for the information, I will have to check that out!
    http://community.webshots.com/user/paintbug

  24. #49
    Senior Member stchenfool's Avatar
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    Interesting - I never thought of layering and spraying on the wall - a great idea!
    Love 4 stchen

  25. #50
    Super Member ljptexas's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing. Very interesting video. The large flannel tablecloth is a great idea. Now need to find wall that has nothing on it....
    ~ I'm a Blessed Nanna to 2 Grandsons & 5 Granddaughters & 1 grandson in law ~
    ~ I'm a Blessed Mom to DS & DDIL, DD & DSIL ~
    ~ Mom to 1 black beauty now ~ Daisy ~
    ~ God Bless the USA ~ God Bless Our Troops ~

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