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Thread: putting the quilt top and back together

  1. #1
    Junior Member paintbug's Avatar
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    putting the quilt top and back together

    I was wondering how most of you hold the front, back and batting together to quilt. do you use pins or spray adhesive, or do you use a different method?
    http://community.webshots.com/user/paintbug

  2. #2
    Junior Member Kim T's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paintbug View Post
    I was wondering how most of you hold the front, back and batting together to quilt. do you use pins or spray adhesive, or do you use a different method?
    I tried the spray basting and did a couple that way, but I am now pinning and I really like it better. It seems easier to me

  3. #3
    Junior Member Hemlock Tea's Avatar
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    I use about a bajillion quilter's safety pins. I've never tried spray basting, though I've wanted to. I have a hard time getting the back straight and pucker-free. I can see me trying to spray baste and getting the batting on all crooked and cursing trying to get it straight and it's all stuck down...
    QMFAO

  4. #4
    Junior Member Joy.lynn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hemlock Tea View Post
    I use about a bajillion quilter's safety pins. I've never tried spray basting, though I've wanted to. I have a hard time getting the back straight and pucker-free. I can see me trying to spray baste and getting the batting on all crooked and cursing trying to get it straight and it's all stuck down...
    If your back is puckering, try starching it. I starch backing quite heavily, and no puckers. Works for flannel too.

  5. #5
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    I either tape my backing down to a flat service or pin it to a makeshift design wall, then I spray baste it with June Tailors spray; I can get it at Walmarts and it's so much cheaper than 505 which I've compared the two and get the same if not better results from JT. Then put the batting; spray and then the top. It holds for along time which is really good since I rarely ever get to stay on task long enough to get one thing done before I start another one. I've tried the pins but they get in the way and sometimes it's hard to prejudge where you are going to sew to pin them out of your line of sewing.
    Judy

  6. #6
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    I baste with thread, usually 8 pieces and maybe a few extra on the edges. HOWEVER, I am hand quilting, I understand you need to be much fussier for machine quilting. Any wrinkles on the back I can deal with as I move my hoop.

    ETA - I have used basting spray many years ago but was scared off by all the warnings on the label about cancer etc. Has it changed since then?

  7. #7
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    tried pinning once, never again....tried spray basting, will never do anything else! spray basting is so easy and fast that I will never pin again. starch is your best friend - it will make the sandwich slide easier under the needle, as well as help keep the puckers from happening on the back - more is better (it washes out). If you do a search here, you will find many threads and many differing opinions on the best way to sandwich/baste your quilt.

  8. #8
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    When I discovered spray basting.. it completely changed my quilting life! It seemed no matter how many pins , how much I ironed/pressed , no matter how careful I was making the sandwich...... I always ended up with PUCKERS! But with spray basting .... my dreams of puckerless quilting came true!

  9. #9
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    The best results I've had are with Hobbs 80/20 fusible quilt batt. I am going to try spray basting this summer. I watched the Youtube video of Patsy Thompson (I think) she does hers on a wall. it looked like it works really well.

  10. #10
    Senior Member leggz48's Avatar
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    I put everything on the floor with backing down then batting and then the top. I baste with a long needle from corner to corner, then side to side. If the quilt is very big, I also baste around the edge. I leave long tails at each end. Never had a problem with puckering. I've not tried the spray, but it sounds promising. Good luck!
    Linda

  11. #11
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    I use Sharon Schamber's basting method. It's easy to do and makes a very smooth and stable quilt sandwich. She has videos on youtube.

  12. #12
    Senior Member krysti's Avatar
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    I've only done the one quilt so far, but I spray basted it and it worked great! Came out flat as a board, and stayed that way!
    ​Krysti

  13. #13
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    I use Sharon Schamber's basting method. It's easy to do and makes a very smooth and stable quilt sandwich. She has videos on youtube.
    I did this for the first time yesterday only I used pins instead of a needle and thread. It is as smooth as can be. It was an experience as her video shows a small sample and I had a 81" quilt and a queen size batt. The next one will go much faster, I'm sure, but it was a pleasure to be able to sandwich a quilt at home without using the floor.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyaLs...6&feature=plcp

  14. #14
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    I tried spray basting a queen size on the wall and was not happy with it. I had problems with the batting stretching and misshaping. When I took it down from the wall there were wrinkles all on the backing. So I took it apart and laid it on my tables (with the help of my son) and spray basted that way. Had to shift it around to get it all on the table top but i like the results better when i finished. I have used the hobss fusible and really like it also. I was looking for something that was quicker than pin basting since I have a tendency to make large quilts. However, it looks like more pin basting will be in my future - in addition to spray basting on the table.

  15. #15
    Super Member azwendyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    I use Sharon Schamber's basting method. It's easy to do and makes a very smooth and stable quilt sandwich. She has videos on youtube.
    I use her method, but usually with 505 spray instead of basting with thread these days.
    Wendy

  16. #16
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    Before I got my quilting frame, I would tape the backing to the floor, lay the batting out, smooth it down, tape it to the backing, lay the top down, smooth it out, tape it to the backing and then put enough safety pins in it to where I knew nothing was going to shift. It allso probably added a extra pound or two to the weight of everthing

  17. #17
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    i baste with a needle & thread- in a cross hatch type pattern- lines about 3-4" apart in both directions. i personally hate having to remove all the pins - pulling threads is so much easier-and for me faster- and i've not had much luck with the sprays except on small projects-always wind up thread basting anyway- so see no reason to bother (waste my money) on the sprays
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  18. #18
    Member egagnon291's Avatar
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    I only hand quilt so don't know if this would work for machine quilting, but I baste quilt using pearl cotton and a long needle. I find it much quicker than pins. I also starch backing. Haven't tried the spray, but after reading the comments I think I'll try it.

  19. #19
    Senior Member cassiemae's Avatar
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    I have always pinned mine and I have no problem with it. I am going to try something different for my knees I am \
    I am using are a little too big for my skinny legs and I have a had time keeping them on. I do have a new idea and
    when I get this quilt finished I am on I am going to try my new idea for the next one. (good Luck)
    "BIG SKY COUNTRY"

  20. #20
    Super Member moreland's Avatar
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    I absolutely never use anything but the basting spray. It works on every type of quilt I've tried it on. I do a lot of quilting on my sewing machine, not any long-arm.
    God Bless,
    Rachel

  21. #21
    Super Member Sweeterthanwine's Avatar
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    I use spray for basting. I've tried pinning and it killed my fingers and the long stitch basting didn't work for me either. If the quilt is washing after using spray basting, I think it will be okay for the long term, at least I hope so.

  22. #22
    Super Member Raggiemom's Avatar
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    I pin the sandwich, using the pinmoors to hold in place. I have spray basted before though and that worked well. The problem was I didn't like breathing the fumes and it's not always convenient to have the window open to let the fumes out.
    Heather

  23. #23
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    I spread mine on my queen size bed, use basting spray from walmart, and some pins. Could probably do without any pins as the spray works really well, but I just don't completely trust it, so I still put some pins, but not near as many as before I started using the spray! And I only stitch in the ditch on regular sewing machine or I machine tack sometimes.
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  24. #24
    QM
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    If I am doing a large quilt, I go to our local senior center (not at a meal time), shove 2-3 tables together, tape down my well starched backing, with a friend, "float" the batting into place, then the well starched flimsy. I pin like crazy. When I have one table worth of quilt pin basted, I remove that table.

    What I don't do: no spray basting as it triggers my asthma, even out of doors. I have spinal arthritis, so I only use pins I can pick up with a magnet, ergo, no curved pins. JHittle has a great telescoping magnet. I was dissatisfied with a tack gun, as every point that was tacked could wobble a bit. Also, I tended to jam the gun, although DH did not. I don't use iron on bats for bed quilts because I don't care for the texture, but they are great IMHO for wallhangings etc. Obviously, these are statements that are very personal to me and none of them may apply to you. The bottom line is that you will meed to find what works really well for you.

  25. #25
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    I thread baste using Susan Schamber's method. I agree, much easier to pull thread than try to unpin pins!!! It did take me several hours to baste a king size quilt, but that sucker did not move as i was hand-quilting it!! LOL!!
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

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