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Thread: Question

  1. #1
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    How often are you suppose to change the needle in your machine?
    2. If u have older singers are u still suppose to take them in once a year? How do u afford it when u have multiple machines??

  2. #2
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    How old are you talking about? My old machines are 75-100 years old. They are easy to maintain--no need to take them anywhere--just keep all the gears oiled up and the bobbin area clean.

  3. #3
    Power Poster cjomomma's Avatar
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    Wish I could answer this for you but I'm really bad about changing my needles and neither of my machines have been professionally serviced. I just can't afford it so I try to keep them cleaned and oiled.

  4. #4
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    Old machines are easily cleaned by their owners. That's part of their beauty. I change my needle every time I start a new project.

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I change my needles when I hear them make a popping sound, or my stitches aren't right LOL OR on the rare occasion that I remember it has been a while :oops:

    I clean my own machines, and do not take them in unless they need a repair that I cannot do :D:D:D

  6. #6
    Senior Member willis.debra's Avatar
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    My machine has not been serviced by a pro. I just clean and oil and if anything needs to be fixed I either get a repair book or find a tutorial on the net. I like to do everything myself if I can.

  7. #7
    Senior Member coloradosky's Avatar
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    My husband bought me a Viking for Christmas about 5 years ago. I set it up so I could use a cone of thread (with the thread coming from the back side of the machine) and, yes, even though I took precautions the thread coming from behind wound a hundred times around the hand wheel. I almost cried because our Viking dealer had just closed its doors and all I could see was big $$$ signs in front of my eyes if I took it to a repair shop. I worked for hours trying to manually unwind the thread. Oh, did I mention it was Sulky Rayon thread, Ugh! I finally gave up. When my husband got up that morning I confessed and showed him the machine. He got the plastic wheel off and I was able to remove a lot of the thread but it had gotten down inside the plastic case around the arm that holds the wheel on. I sat there and checked all the places where it appeared the case separated and found another screw to remove and, walla, the case came off and I was able to remove every bit of thread. I gave the machine a good cleaning inside (surprisingly very little thread or lint accumulation) put that baby back together and she purrs like a kitten! Of course, I would never have attempted this if the machine was still under warranty. Even the newer machines can be maintained (to some degree)at home.

  8. #8
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    I seem to test the limits of my needles so typically my needles get changed whenever they break! I try to change mine after some heavy useage (a large quilt pieced and quilted, several quilt tops, or several smaller projects).

  9. #9
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    needles should be changed between each project or after 8 hours of sewing time--which ever comes first- and sooner if you start having uneven or skipped stitches- some fabrics will dull the needle faster than others.

    you should clean your machine every second bobbin---and if it's a new-fancy machine---follow the maintenance guidelines in your manual--they tell you how to clean it and oil-if it needs to be oiled-
    if you start having problems with stitch quality or other issues it may have to go to a shop-but you should be able to do 98% of the maintenance yourself for years. i do have a computerized machine- which i've been taking care of for a long time- it's been in to a shop once in the past 5 years--had a problem with my reverse ... but that was a whole different matter :)

  10. #10
    Super Member Glassquilt's Avatar
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    You can take care of an older mechanical machine yourself.
    A newer electronic/computerized one needs a bit more than the average sewer can do. In part it depends on how much you use it. If you only sew once in a while you can stretch out the time between shop visits.

  11. #11
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    I use Superior Threads titanium 80/12. It's been on my machine since October 2009 and sewing fine still
    Bob Purcell says they last 8 times longer that other needles

  12. #12
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    I tend to put in a new needle when I start a new quilt. I say tend because I sometimes forget. My Bernina has a display when it is time to oil her or bring her in for a maintainence. So far I have only had to oil her and I have a back-up for when she needs to go to the shop. Since I CAN'T be without my machine, I try to clean out the lint after a big sewing job, check the thread route for lint and change the needle if needed.

  13. #13
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    Thanks everyone! I sew appreciate everyone!!!

  14. #14
    Super Member calla's Avatar
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    If your machine does embroidery, change the needle at least every 8 hrs. However, I usually flex because if the design is dense and lots of stitches like 40,000 (anitagoodesigns are good for that) I change it sooner. I can' purchase a needle for $1.00 easier than have a design messed up when nearly finished. With my computer machines they need to be professionally cleaned annually. I do the best I can with the bobbin area every time I change the bobbin, but the lubercation isn't oil so I was told by a dealer............my older mechanical machines.......no problem do it myself. calla

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