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Thread: Questions about charging and rag quilts

  1. #1
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    Questions about charging and rag quilts

    Hi,
    I have been asked to do 5 rag quilts for a lady for Christmas. She will provide all fabric and batting for the quilts. They are twin sized. Has anyone made them? How long do they take? What do most of you, who quilt for others, charge per hour for the piecing of quilts?

  2. #2
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    Tip: From the comments I've seen on this board, give the finished quilts to the customer and let HER run them through her washer to rag them. lol

  3. #3
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    the quilts do go together fairly fast- but the clipping is quite time consuming (and hard on the hands) then the laundering, shaking, laundering, shaking... you should decide (with her) a price per quilt- agree mutually and get a 50% deposit before starting them- with the balance due when you deliver the quilts- when I do commission quilt I let the purchaser know the deposit is non-refundable; and payment has to be paid in full before they get the quilts. if you want to price them by the hour you need to decide what your time is worth- I charge $20 an hour for sewing- but when it comes to quilts I always decide on a price for the quilt- unless you've made a few and know how long it will take you it is difficult to estimate- you may think you can make one in 8 hours- then find it takes you 20...is she going to acceptable to paying so much? maybe you should make yourself a raggy quilt, see what it takes, how long it takes, and whether or not you really want to make 5 of them- that would also give you the chance to decide what a fair price would be.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  4. #4
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Don't even think about snipping five rag quilts without these:

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/12461345?wmlspartner=wlpa&adid=22222222227000174527&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=14043910870&wl4=&wl5=pla&wl6=34959558310&veh=sem


    Trust me, they are the best and you will never regret having them.
    Got fabric?

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    DITTO WHAT ckcowl said. Make one first and see if you want to do 5 for some one else. What size does she want? you might want to throw up after a couple. LOL! Also is she going to pre-wash the material or do you have to?

  6. #6
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    If I were making 5 of them I would look into the price of one of the AccuQuilt cutters with the rag quilt die. It would save a ton of time and would probably pay for itself.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    Don't even think about snipping five rag quilts without these:

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/12461345?wmlspartner=wlpa&adid=22222222227000174527&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=14043910870&wl4=&wl5=pla&wl6=34959558310&veh=sem


    Trust me, they are the best and you will never regret having them.
    These are great and wickedly sharp!!

    Tip: ( I admit it's in the DUH category) hold it so the hook/latch is on the bottom. I was getting so frustrated with the snips hooking/ latching themselves when the safety hook was on top,

  8. #8
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    You might also need to agree on what the finished dimensions will be.
    If you decide to do them.
    This person might be expecting WalMart closeout prices for your work.

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    I agree with dunster. the accuquilt is the way to go. You can find some good prices online.

  10. #10
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    If you want to have an idea, check the prices on Etsy for twin size rag quilts.
    Your customer might change her mind very quickly when she knows how much it will cost.
    In case you go ahead and she wants you to do the washing, take them to the laudrymat.

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    I've made a rag quilt and it takes a lot more time than you think it will take. I agree with making one for yourself and then decide if you want to make 5 more. Just for the record, I did not find it difficult to make the quilt, but the clipping and washing do take up a lot of time.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

  12. #12
    Super Member orangeroom's Avatar
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    I'm 43 and have made many rag quilts that measure 7 x 9 blocks. Usually 8" batting and 10" fabric (prior to snipping). If I'm doing nothing else I can make one in 24 hours. Even my hands will feel the pain after that and I have rag snips, bought from JoAnns. Seeing how I do count sleep time in that...take away ~8 hours...or 9 if we subtract eating and bathroom trips. 15 hours is a lot of time, if you're charging what a normal person should charge. She may just change her mind. Anyways, if you do launder these at home, clean out the lint trap once every 5 minutes. I'm NOT kidding. Only one at a time! We've got high efficiency washer and dryer.

    I wouldn't recommend the pre-cut squares, then you have to worry that you're not catching the snipped part in your sewing. Careful to not snip too far. If you do, then make sure you fix it by sewing around the too far snipped area immediately. If not after it's dried, you will see a big 'flppt' poking out into the smooth side of the quilt.

    Good luck!
    Go forth and sew!

  13. #13
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    She also probably thinks by supplying the material goods, the "labor" will be cheap.
    sandy
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  14. #14
    Super Member willferg's Avatar
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    Even with the spring-loaded clippers, it's a lot of work and makes your hands get tired. Just sayin'.
    People who start projects and never finish them are cooler
    than people who never start projects at all.


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  15. #15
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I have the rag dies for the Go. I like the 8" square rag die the best. I cut all my bigger scraps into rag squares. I have stacks of them ready to sew together when I need a quilt made fast. They make great donation quilts.
    Got fabric?

  16. #16
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    Could you agree to teach her how to cut the squares of flannel and batting and then the ragging. I prefer my Fiskars Rag Snips for ragging [she could buy her own snips too.]

    Let her help as she want the quilts. Unless she is infirm, then charge what you are comfortable with.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  17. #17
    Super Member MaryMo's Avatar
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    If you have not made one, I would suggest making one first to see how well you get along in the process. I've made several with the first one being the most fun. The last couple I made from scrap denim (from discarded jeans) and flannel I did not snip and they raveled just fine.

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    I have made about 8 rag quilts.

    I have only used batting in two, ones I made a dog quilts for last years secret santa. All the rest I either used denim and flannel with nothing in the middle (denim is very heavy). Or just a layer of flannel in the middle. If you do not use bating you will save time in the sewing. Flannel also adds to the ragged edge.

    I cannot imagine snipping 5 quilts between now and Christmas. My hands hurt thinking of it.

    A tip, if you have a top loading washing machine and have a soak cycle (that does not drain), use it. Strain the water with an wire strainer every few minutes. Keep repeating the agitating cycle. You will be amazed at how many thread bits you get out. Then complete the cycle and do as other shave said clean out the dryer screen every few minutes during the dry cycle.

    If you are on septic I would not wash the quilt at home, the lint will clog the system.

    I love rag quilts, but I would not make one for money.
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

  19. #19
    Super Member judykay's Avatar
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    Tip: ( I admit it's in the DUH category) hold it so the hook/latch is on the bottom. I was getting so frustrated with the snips hooking/ latching themselves when the safety hook was on top,[/QUOTE]

    Thanks for this post, I now know the correct way to hold them, I too had the same problem. I have always said this board it the best, & so full of valuable information.
    Happy Quilting
    Judy in Lower Michigan

  20. #20
    Member arheath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hsquiltingmom View Post
    Hi,
    I have been asked to do 5 rag quilts for a lady for Christmas. She will provide all fabric and batting for the quilts. They are twin sized. Has anyone made them? How long do they take? What do most of you, who quilt for others, charge per hour for the piecing of quilts?
    I have made several rag quilts however I don't use batting in mine. I think they are quite heavy enough without it. Also I just wet mine real good, shake them outside and toss in the dryer a couple of times. Rag just fine without all the washing.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  21. #21
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    that is a beautiful quilt!! I am wanting to do a rag quilt , i just cant find the time!
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  22. #22
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    Lots of good info here (as always :-) ). Love the idea of trying to get her to do part of it.

    Baby quilt size rags (flannel, I think) are $150 on one site on Etsy!

    I like the accuquilt dye for rag quilts - never have too much trouble with the seams - and sooooo much better than having to make all those snips! I have used spring loaded snips too - now can't imagine making one without the accuquilt.

    Also, if you use fleece (lots of color/print choices, soft and cuddly) you won't need batting and the snips curl really well. I don't like the lint of cutting and sewing fleece, but I do like the outcome.

    If you want an 'ultimate' rag quilt - in my opinion - I just love the ones made with homespun. Just don't wash and dry it at home!!!

    Big decision here.

  23. #23
    Power Poster twinkie's Avatar
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    I agree. I have made many rag quilts and the snipping is the most difficult and painful part of the quilts. Whoever washes them, make sure to use a large terry cloth towel in the washing and drying. It really helps in the "ruffling" or ragging process.
    Name:  Pink Panda rag quilt.jpg
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    Quote Originally Posted by AliKat View Post
    Could you agree to teach her how to cut the squares of flannel and batting and then the ragging. I prefer my Fiskars Rag Snips for ragging [she could buy her own snips too.]

    Let her help as she want the quilts. Unless she is infirm, then charge what you are comfortable with.

  24. #24
    Super Member Amythyst02's Avatar
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    Rag quilts are so fun. It was my first try at quilting. The only bad thing is the clipping, and being new I just used regular scissors. I will get those clipper things next time : )
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Amythyst

  25. #25
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    I have two rag quilts I have to make. One was put together with the batting inside and was ragged by an Accuquilt. I'm looking forward to making that one. The other is already cut to 8" and has the batting inside but not ragged. The only reason I bought them was because they were pre-cut and had the batting inside.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
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