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Thread: Quick help needed - little girls want to sew!!!!

  1. #1
    Junior Member RGAY's Avatar
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    Exclamation Quick help needed - little girls want to sew!!!!

    Help! My granddaughters (ages 7, 6) arrive tonight (Fri, 5/24) and I just learned that the 7 yr old has become very interested in sewing.

    Any quick, easy, low frustration ideas for what I can do with her??????? I saw the criss-cross coasters in an earlier thread this week but wonder if a young girl needs coasters......

    Help!!!! I am grateful for whatever advice comes my way!!

  2. #2
    Super Member TexasSunshine's Avatar
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    What about a pillowcase, a large pillow for watching TV or an apron.
    Texas Sunshine, piney woods of NE Texas

  3. #3
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
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    I used to help out at 4H and the little ones loved to make book bags. They are so simple yet useful. Just sew side seams, leaving an opening at both sides for the cording to go. Press and turn and stitch the seams again to create a sturdy French seam. Then turn the hem across the top and stitch. Put rope through the hem extending through the holes you left. Does this make sense?

  4. #4
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    i second the pillow case. you can also make a little quilt for dolls...and in all honesty, just sitting at the machine and sewing on fabric usually makes the little ones happy ENJOY the visit!

  5. #5
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
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    I second the pillow case - or even a small carry all bag?
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
    Obsessed Quilter and APQS Long Arm Machine Quilter
    www.pumpkinpatchquilter.com

  6. #6
    Senior Member bigredharley's Avatar
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    or a doll blanket for her and sister.
    ​Nancy

  7. #7
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    My girls began making pajama pants..They were easy and they love wearing them

  8. #8
    Super Member charsuewilson's Avatar
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    I'd start with a pillow, then a 9 patch with 2.5" squares, unless they like dolls, then I might do 1.5" squares, to make a quilt for their doll.

  9. #9
    Super Member sweetpea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nanna-up-north View Post
    I used to help out at 4H and the little ones loved to make book bags. They are so simple yet useful. Just sew side seams, leaving an opening at both sides for the cording to go. Press and turn and stitch the seams again to create a sturdy French seam. Then turn the hem across the top and stitch. Put rope through the hem extending through the holes you left. Does this make sense?
    I'm with nanna on this. but I would make the rope longer and sew the rope to the bottom to make it a backpack.
    Scrapy quilts have more love in them.

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    The first thing my granddaughter made when she visited was a pillowcase. I had her use the edge of the presser foot as a guide. You could also make drawstring bags.

  11. #11
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    I had kids sewing at my house once a week last summer. We started with lines on lined notebook paper, no thread
    then graduated to string blocks. The string blocks are good starter because with a foundation underneath, you dont' have to be TOO picky about seams. They can be chunky or thin as long as the edge gets caught. once flipped and sewn over covers alot of booboos. When the seams become a bit more consistnent (or boredom with string blocks sets in!), pillowcases are wonderful! My sewing kids were 13, 10 and 6. 2 boys and one girl. The boys LOVED the serger when we did pillowcases. I think they would have made more as long as the serger was involved! lolol
    Beth in AZ
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    Innova 22' with Lightning Stitch and Pantovision
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  12. #12
    Junior Member RGAY's Avatar
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    Oh my goodness, thank you all for such speedy responses!!!! What an amazing bunch of helpful people you all are! Sewing on lined paper to get the feel of straight lines (i could probably use a bit of that skill practice.....) and then pillowcase and carry all bag on the docket!!!! If it rains, maybe a teeny tiny quilt!!! Many, many thanks!

  13. #13
    Senior Member Sideways's Avatar
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    I gave my friend Kathy a hamper full of scraps for her granddaughters. They loved to look at and pick out the fabric that they wanted to use. So maybe let them pick the fabrics!

    I'm so proud to have played a small part in the development of new quilters!! I taught their grandma, my friend Kathy to quilt too.
    Never met a scrap of fabric or vintage sewing machine I didn't like!
    Many a lost and lonely vintage machine has found a home with me, 26 and------ uh oh lost count, who is counting anyway!

    Susan

  14. #14
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    my mom was a home economic teacher. when she taught my girls, she started with lines on paper and no thread in the needle, then progressed to squiggly lines with no thread, then thread to make designs. The straight seaming things. Pj bottoms are a favorite, though you'll probably have to help with cutting out and elastic. let them pick out the fabric. The thing with the pj's is that they have a big brag factor with other kids, which reinforces the desire to keep sewing. also teach them how to thread a needle and do a sewing knot ( dampen finger, wrap thread around 3-4 times and roll with your fingers)

  15. #15
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Rag quilts are easy for kids and quick.

  16. #16
    Senior Member kaelynangelfoot's Avatar
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    My young cousin also started showing an interest in sewing at that age. We made a very simple 4 patch doll blanket, no batting, quilting, or binding. And now she is slowly working on a crib size blanket, again pieced all with squares.

  17. #17
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    At that age my gran had me making doll blankets and matching doll pillows, which were stuffed with scraps.

    My blankets were made with the "birther" method (2 pieces of fabric with right sides together, sew 3 sides and part of 4th, turn inside out & hand-sew the gap, then we'd add 4-5 yarn ties to hold the halves together) so very very simple; no piecing, batting or binding.

    I also used to hand-sew stuffed mice for our family cats around that age too. I had a really simple pattern that was basically 3 ovals of felt sewn together with yarn for a tail and scraps for stuffing. I'd use markers to make eyes and ears and a nose. Sometimes I'd get fancy and sew beads or itty bitty buttons on for the eyes.

  18. #18
    Member jeaniedrain's Avatar
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    you could try a tote bag. every little (and big) girl loves a pretty tote.

  19. #19
    Senior Member amelia0607's Avatar
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    If they like dolls, I would suggest doll quilts/blankets. When I was a girl, I made clothes for my dolls but I sewed them by hand and they were awful. Had fun doing it though!!

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    All of the idea's are great. However, I would pick 3 as a suggestion and then ask her what she like's best and let her pick. Let her also pick the fabric. Thus, her autonomy get's built and a new sewer is born. I'm real big on letting kids have choices that are all worthwhile.
    Create something beautiful from scraps.

  21. #21
    Super Member sewbeadit's Avatar
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    Why not a patchwork baby sized or lap sized quilt? My gg did that and just was so excited. We used 6" blocks and she sewed them up. Looks cute and she can finish and use it.
    Sewbeadit
    W. Washington

  22. #22
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    I'm with the pajama bottoms. They go fast, and could also morph into shorts. My granddaughter started with shorts (which she never really finished) but ended up with a blue ribbon on a fancy dress the for 4-H fair. She wore the dress for the auditioned talent show at her middle school. Beautiful.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  23. #23
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    My GD when I was visiting her we made a skirt made out of strips she was so proud and even wore it to church with a little t-shirt. When she was here we made a little tote bag nothing fancy but she even carried that into NYC. When she was making the strips for the skirt she made some for her Dad & Mom she has her own sewing machine and she sews on all her Girl Scout badges...it skipped a generation. Shame she is 700 miles away.

  24. #24
    Junior Member IraJane's Avatar
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    I recently looked for this pattern and googled it on-line. Found a tutorial that did a nice job of showing how to make the drawstring bag. As a family consumer science teacher, I used the same pattern to make a bag with my six grade students. They loved them. I make them for my little grandkids, and they call them their "Grandma bags." Great project to learn with.
    Quote Originally Posted by nanna-up-north View Post
    I used to help out at 4H and the little ones loved to make book bags. They are so simple yet useful. Just sew side seams, leaving an opening at both sides for the cording to go. Press and turn and stitch the seams again to create a sturdy French seam. Then turn the hem across the top and stitch. Put rope through the hem extending through the holes you left. Does this make sense?

  25. #25
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    Little girls will always go for doll clothes ,won't they? You can make them quick and they are something they will be proud to show their friends. Just a simple dress with shoulder seams and the sides sewn together will make quick work of it . add a lace ruffle around the bottom and it's ready to put on the doll. It was real successful for my neices but my Gdaughter never was interested in dolls sooo no doll clothes for her!! Good luck and lots of patience wishes coming your way.

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