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Thread: Quilt batting for colder climates

  1. #1
    Member Sew happy's Avatar
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    I looked through the topic batting and didn't know whether to post this there or start it in a new topic. I have been making quilts for years and prefer cotton batting. I've recently completed my grandsons quilt and my daughter asked me to use a batting that would make the quilt suitable for warmth in the winter time climate. She doesn't want me to use a wool batting. She lives in another state with colder winters than we have in South Florida.
    Are there any battings that are cotton and a bit thicker than warm and natural batting? Also, would flannel fabric as a batting instead of regular cotton batting be a better option?Could I use flannel and a cotton batting? Thickness will not be a problem sewing because I will be machine quilting it on an industrial sewing machine. I haven't used polyester batting in years and didn't like it because years ago it became brittle with age and can beard into the quilt top after a few years. Maybe polyester has improved and this could be another option. Thanks for any suggestions, I sincerely appreciate some advice.

  2. #2
    Super Member Dragonfly Nana's Avatar
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    I love the Warm and Natural batting. It is all natural cotton (also comes in white) that is light but very warm. If you wanted you could double it to make the quilt thicker.
    I do understand cold and the need for quilts... January at Gram's in PA with a coal furnace two floors down!

  3. #3
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I like Warm and Natural batting. It is warm. We are having a cold winter in Iowa and it great to wrap up in a quilt at night.

  4. #4
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    Warm and natural is my choice too.

  5. #5
    Lisa T's Avatar
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    I have an old quilt that my great-grandma made using a blanket for batting. My husband and I fight over it all the time. (I live in Upper Michigan where it's winter about 9 months of the year.)

    What if you used a Vellux, or similar, blanket inside? That would be SUPER warm, and should be thin enough to machine quilt.

  6. #6
    Member Sew happy's Avatar
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    Thanks for the suggestions/ideas. I never thought of doubling the warm and natura batting or enclosing a blanket in the quilt. Since I prefer cotton batting, I will try doubling the warm and natural. That seems like the best solution to making it really warm and still using cotton batting.

  7. #7
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    I just wanted to comment on your idea of a flannel with the cotton batting ...
    I had a quilt that I had sewn strips on to a lightweight cotton foundation, then the backing was going to be flannel, so I put flannel on the inside ... my little machine handled it just fine. With an industrial machine, it will be like sewing through butter. And, I am going to keep in mind the doubled batting as well as a flannel WITH batting.
    Do you think that the amount of quilting can also make a difference as to how warm a quilt is?

  8. #8
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Doubling the cotton batting, and using a flannel as the backing...should make a very warm and snuggly quilt :D:D:D

  9. #9
    Member Sew happy's Avatar
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    Thanks, I think the flannel backing will also contribute additional warmth. It may be a few weeks before it's finished but will try to post a pic.

  10. #10
    Member Sew happy's Avatar
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    I don't think the amount of quilting would make any difference to warmth, but I guess it could. It might keep some warmth in the quilt. That's a good question. I never thought of it.

  11. #11
    Super Member ginnie6's Avatar
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    well I'm a new quilter and we are in the south but it still gets cold here and with wood heat the bedrooms are not toasty. For dd's quilt I have used an old blanket. I'm still finishing it up but it is heavy and warm. Hopefully it will be on her bed in the next week or so. For the quilts I'm making the boys I'm thinking about fleece for the batting with a flannel backing.

  12. #12
    Senior Member canuckninepatch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly Nana
    I love the Warm and Natural batting. It is all natural cotton (also comes in white) that is light but very warm. If you wanted you could double it to make the quilt thicker.
    I do understand cold and the need for quilts... January at Gram's in PA with a coal furnace two floors down!
    I also love using the Warm and Natural batting. But once I tried doubling the batting in a baby quilt, and found that it made it rather stiff. I vowed I wouldn't do that again.

  13. #13
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly Nana
    I love the Warm and Natural batting. It is all natural cotton (also comes in white) that is light but very warm. If you wanted you could double it to make the quilt thicker.
    I do understand cold and the need for quilts... January at Gram's in PA with a coal furnace two floors down!
    I use warm and natural for all my quilts

  14. #14
    Member Sew happy's Avatar
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    The Walmart near my home has closed their fabric dept. and I found another Walmart that still carries fabric. I'm careful about buying fabric from Walmart for quilts because some of it is too poor in quality to put into a quilt. I found some high quality flannel called super flannel at that Walmart. Thanks for the suggestions to use flannel on the back of the quilt. With the Warm and natural batting and the super flanel this should be plenty warm for warmth and comfort. I could hardly believe I found this flannel at Walmart, so guess you never know what you might find if you look for it.

  15. #15
    Member Sew happy's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip. I had planned to double the Warm and natural batting...but I hate stiff quilts. So will stick with one layer of warm and natural and a flannel backing. (You probably saved me from a disaster...much thanks.

  16. #16
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    Be sure to wash the flannel before using it in a quilt because it will probably shrink quite a bit.

  17. #17
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    Is there a reason she doesn't want wool? That would be the warmest, I would think.

  18. #18
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    Doesn't wool shrink a lot when you wash a quilt?

  19. #19
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    Some wool will shrink, but I think there are some that say they are washable and dryable. I haven't used it yet, but I plan to soon.

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