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Thread: Quilt or Blanket?

  1. #26
    Senior Member justme's Avatar
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    I agree with Ellen 1, once you give it away, it's no longer your baby.

    I have 4 children and all of them would recieve a different type of quilt from me... one would have no regard for the quilt, couldn't care less how it is used, abused.., 2 others would appriciate it, but not cherish it, and the last... use it, cherish it, and know that he will have them forever. He does not hesitate to give me "ideas" for different quilt patters..

    by the way.. 3 sons, 1 daughter... the daughter could care less.
    amazing..

  2. #27
    Super Member Lneal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBunn
    I tried selecting the recipents of the quilts....but . For those that I "should" make a quilt to avoid hard feelings...I limit not only what I will spend on the material but also what kind of time I will invest. Quickie weekend quilts have been something I felt I could give to those that dont have the appreciation for the work involved....that way everyone ends up with their quilt and my feelings are less hurt.
    KBunn sounds like a good rule to follow. Thanks!

  3. #28
    Super Member SaraSewing's Avatar
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    I've been making "camping quilts" just for the purpose of perhaps getting dirty, throwing down for a nap in the park, etc. Mostly denim, suiting weight, some flannel. All of my kids have requested their own. A couple of them keep in in their vehicle. My husband and I have one in our Explorer that we use for those spur-of-the-moment picnics or naps. tee-hee.

  4. #29
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I read an article in a quilt magazine where the featured quilter sent a quilt to her mother in Poland. The mother cried because she thought her daughter was so poor that she had to cut up scraps tp make a blanket. That puts a whole new spin on how quilts may be received.

  5. #30
    Senior Member Sandy1951's Avatar
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    Does anyone remember the scene near the end of "How to Make an American Quilt" where the Winona Ryder character drags her new quilt in the dirt? I remember watching that for the first time and getting upset. "I can't believe she just dragged that quilt they put so much time in through the dirt. Look at that! How could the director have her do that?" :-D I guess it was a little silly for me to carry on like that, it was a movie, after all. But still.

  6. #31
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I am of the mind that when i give a quilt it is most important to me that the recipient actually uses the quilt...a few years ago we kind of got into this (making beach quilts) sold a few, people LOVED them, they were fun, summery with appliques and bigger than a big beach towel...on the 4th of july at the park i thought it was way cool to be walking along and see 5 of the quilts i had made spread out and being enjoyed by generations together...at one point though a person (a caring quilter who couldn't stand it) walked up to a family very proud of their quilt and was so incredibly RUDE it amazed me...she jumped all over these people and even threatened to take the quilt away from them!!!one of the kids ran and found me, i came on the run...
    this woman was soooo indignant, and let me know how it's "People like me" who causes this type of 'mis-use'...

    seriously...if you do not want the quilt you give to be used...make a wall hanging. the first quilt i hand quilted is a red and white embroidered quilt...my granddaughters consider it their PICNIC Quilt, and LOVE it...it is used and loved , isn't that why we do this. if you are going to make an heirloom that you do not want used, tell the recipient when you give it..."oh, yes, heres a gift for you, i spent hundreds of hours creating it for you but don't you dare use it...hide it, i have too much into it for you to really put it out, someone may sit on it...heaven forbid..."
    sorry for the rant but .......................

  7. #32
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    are your quilts not washable? mine fluff up, get incredibly soft and are just better and better with each wash

  8. #33
    thismomquilts's Avatar
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    I love the thought of the quilts I make being used - no, not necessarily for dog quilts or for cats to give birth on, but for children/families to enjoy their picnics on - yes! for a cuddly 'blanket' on the back of a couch - yes!, for a child to drag around as his/her 'blankie' - yes! To be packed away in a trunk or box or the back of the closet - no!! BUT it IS the recipient's quilt and he/she can do with them as they please. I made one for my sister as she was going through a really hard time - she LOVES it and uses it all the time, her son, who HAD :) lymphoma LOVES his - he took it with him for chemo every time - her daughter - does not like hers - never have heard fo her using it even one time... :) - different strokes for different folks!

  9. #34
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    I have been quilting for a long time. My quilts are not show stoppers but they were created with love, both for the recipient and just the love of the process. When my siblings were younger, I used to make baby blankets for my nieces and nephews when they arrived. On niece arrived and I promptly sent a quilt. I never heard a word from my brother nor sister-in-law until a year later when we were at a get together at my mom's. I didn't expect an earth shattering thank you, but did want at least an acknowledgment that the thing was even received in the mail. They went on to have two more daughters, but never got another quilt from me. It is only good manners to treat the quilt with respect after all the work that went in to it and to thank the person that made it. This has always been a sore point with me because so many people don't appreciate what they have when they have been given a quilt. Another sister-in-law told me that it was almost tempting to try for child no. 5 just to see what new beautiful quilt I'd produce. They stopped at 4 boys, but she has a warm place in my heart for saying something that sweet.

  10. #35
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    I just saw you online and was going to reply, but now you are gone. I was wondering where in SW Iowa you are from. I am from Avoca. Guess I don't know how to send a private message yet. I hope you are cozy and warm this snowy day!

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by littlehud
    I always give my quilts with a note to please use them and most people do. My soon to be son in law has has packed his away because he feels it is a heirloom because it is hand made. I would rather he used it but it was given as a gift and he can do as he wants with it. SIGH
    I replied to your posting but didn't put the quote. Just wondering where in SW Iowa you are from. I am from Avoca.

  12. #37
    Super Member EagarBeez's Avatar
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    Wow, all these stories remind me of the one quilt I made for my granddaughter. It was a queen size as that is the size her mom says they were buying for her. I even embroidered her name on the front. It took me almost a year and a half. Once given, I told my step daughter how to care for it. When my husband and I went to visit, I was in my grandaughters room and saw this quilt with torn squares and all dirty and half off the bed. The big german shepherd slept with my granddaugter or used it for a nap and it looked awful. I wanted to cry. I mentioned this to my step daughter and she asked if I could fix it. I thought and thought how would I fix this 'puff quilt". I thought of a possible way without pulling much apart. I did not fix it that time. The next time I saw it, it was tossed in the bottom of my granddaughters closet with all toys on top of it. The kids played hide and seek in the closet and were all over it. I was sick, sick, sick. I decided then and there if they treat this quilt this way, I am not going to take hours to fix it if that is all they think of it.
    My step daughter asked me to make her and american/americana out of the scraps I have from another quilt. I had to think this over for about 6 mths. I could just picture it being used as an animal or kids romper room item. The thought scared me. Someone said once you give a gift it is no longer yours.
    I talked it over with my husband, and I am currently working on it although my heart still isn't in it sometimes. Once it leaves my hands that is it. I told my daughter in law, you don't realize the expense and numerous hours to make a quilt. If you let the dog or the kids play on it and it gets torn, I will give you some extra fabric to fix it yourself. Maybe then you would realize just what goes into making one

  13. #38
    Senior Member judithb's Avatar
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    This is a line of conversation that I could have started! We have a large extended combined family. My goal was to make the 3 children, 9 grandchildren, and 9 great grandchildren each a quilt. Well, I received 1 actual thank you letter and that was from the 7 y/o daughter of a second cousin. I have even called some of the adults to make sure they got the quilt since I hadn't heard from them.The last quilt for gg daughter is ready to mail for this Christmas. And yes, the dogs get on the beds where the quilt are...

    The kids quilts are smaller and I can quilt them myself. The adults receive Queen size quilts cost about $200 to just for the quilting!

    From this forum I learned of the downy.com quilts for kids foundation. Now I quilt and know the quilts will be used and enjoyed by the kids who receive them. And yes, you receive a thank you note for each quilt! I will continue to make quilts for others, but I will be keeping a total of hours I work on them! Thanks for that suggestion/idea.

    I do receive thank you notes from friends for whom I make quilts.

  14. #39
    Super Member sawsan's Avatar
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    EagarBeez : I feel how much u feel sick. I pictured as it happened 2me
    and that what make me Iffffffffffffffffffff i made a quilt as a gift will be only wall hanging (( small))
    What u think every body??????????????????

  15. #40

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    I recently made a baby quilt for a friend of mine who is pregnant. It was a simple rail fence quilt with lots of neutral colours that really didnt take too long to make, but it was still a significant effort, as any quilt is.

    I sent it to her and got back a letter (a hand written letter!) thanking me. In this letter she gushed how beautiful the quilt was and how she almost didnt want the baby playing wit it because it would get ruined.

    I called her a few days later. I explained that I would be much happier if she brought the quilt back to me in few year to fix it because it was used and loved so much that it was falling apart than if it sat in a closet and ever got used. I told her that nothing would please me more than this quilt becomming the "blankie" for her child that would never want to part with it. To me, that's the kind of quilt that shows that it has been loved and cherished.

    If I wanted to give something to someone that would remain pristine, it would be a wall quilt and not something like a baby quilt.

  16. #41
    Senior Member judithb's Avatar
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    kamohen
    I love your note and message to the new mother. Very thoughtful and appropriate! :thumbup:

  17. #42
    Super Member Quilt Mom's Avatar
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    A little trick I have started using is to send the quilt by mail with a return receipt requested. The reciever has to sign for the package. Then I know it has been recieved. (Rarely have I gotten any acknowledgement of the quilt.) It does make me sad :-( that people cannot take the time to say 'thank you.'

  18. #43
    Senior Member judithb's Avatar
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    Good idea!

  19. #44
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    some people like quilts and others don't. i give quilts to people i know will enjoy receiving them as a gift and then the other people i buy them something they would like to receive.

    i put a lot of effort into picking out someones gift, whether its a quilt i make or not, its a gift for that person and i want them to enjoy it.

    i have done just about everything people are mentioning is wrong to do with a quilt.

    i have a picnic quilt that i made that cost me at least $400 to make and that doesn't include my time. i've been thinking that the americana dear jane quilting i'm making will be great for a picnic quilt for the 4th of july.

    i have made all my pets beds and many of them - about every 2 years they get new beds and snuggle sacks.

    clearly, i would not be offended if the people i gave a quilt to used it in this way when i do the same thing myself.

    i think its wonderful that they want to use the quilt instead of just sticking it in a closet never to be used.

    if it gets worn out, i'm happy to make them another.

  20. #45
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy1951
    Does anyone remember the scene near the end of "How to Make an American Quilt" where the Winona Ryder character drags her new quilt in the dirt? I remember watching that for the first time and getting upset. "I can't believe she just dragged that quilt they put so much time in through the dirt. Look at that! How could the director have her do that?" :-D I guess it was a little silly for me to carry on like that, it was a movie, after all. But still.
    Me too! I wanted to reach through that monitor and bitch-slap the girl. I read somewhere that they couldn't get the dirt out either.

  21. #46
    Super Member Lneal's Avatar
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    Maybe the problem I have is I am putting too high a value on my time, (which I would be shocked to know) & money (as I buy $9 yd fabric) before I consider who the quilt is for. I don't like to think there is a difference in who I make them for, but after reading about other quilters post I believe I do need to be more selective. There really isn't anything wrong with that.

  22. #47
    Senior Member judithb's Avatar
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    Martina, this is so funny. I had the same reaction to that scene!

  23. #48

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    Last Christmas, my daughter convinced me to make a quilt for her boyfriend's mother. I had some blocks from a class that I was not "particularly" fond of and could part with them easier than with others. So, I made the quilt and it turned out very beautiful in the end. I later asked my daughter if the recipient would allow me to enter it into a show. She did allow this and when I picked up the quilt, she said "my dog had her puppies on it so it might need washing"........Like others have said, quilts sometimes are not as treasured by those who don't labor over making them......

  24. #49
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quilt Mom
    A little trick I have started using is to send the quilt by mail with a return receipt requested. The reciever has to sign for the package. Then I know it has been recieved. (Rarely have I gotten any acknowledgement of the quilt.) It does make me sad :-( that people cannot take the time to say 'thank you.'
    That is an excellent idea! I also tend to get an appraisal if I'm sending a quilt through the mail. This protects me, in case the quilt is stolen, and I make a copy of the appraisal to send to the recipient. When my MIL got her quilt, she about passed out to learn that just the replacement value to make the quilt (not counting time or anything else) was over $900. The quilt is on her bed and I love seeing it used, but I don't have to worry that a quilt I spent almost 500 hours making will end up on the floor or dragged to the beach.


    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy1951
    Does anyone remember the scene near the end of "How to Make an American Quilt" where the Winona Ryder character drags her new quilt in the dirt? I remember watching that for the first time and getting upset. "I can't believe she just dragged that quilt they put so much time in through the dirt. Look at that! How could the director have her do that?" :-D I guess it was a little silly for me to carry on like that, it was a movie, after all. But still.
    Me too! I wanted to reach through that monitor and bitch-slap the girl. I read somewhere that they couldn't get the dirt out either.
    I was horrified too when I watched the movie. I can only imagine what the person who made it must have been thinking to see her work so disrespected.

    If someone wants a picnic or beach quilt, I can do that. It won't be something I've spent hundreds of hours on though, nor will it be hand quilted, as those are quilts that I expect to stay inside and be used, not drug through the mud or dirt.

  25. #50
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    I love to quilt and love to share the results with others. That being said, I only give the labor intensive quilts made with premium quilt fabric to those people I am certain will appreciate the gift. For those folks I know will enjoy the gift but will never truly appreciate the workmanship, etc. involved I make a simple pattern with less expensive (or clearance), fabric. Bottom line - I want the quilt to be used, no point in it sitting in a drawer or on a shelf someplace; and giving them away somehow makes me feel less guilty about buying more fabric!

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