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Thread: Quilt Shops Closing

  1. #51
    Junior Member DJRustic's Avatar
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    Prim Quilts, I have to come to St. Louis once in awhile & I visit some shops there. Could you please post the names of the shops that have closed if you know them. That way I won't try to go to them & waste my time. I also go to a shop just over the state line in Lebanon, Ill. It is called The Calico Moon. Lovely shop. Your name implies you like prims? I too am strictly prim. I have a log home that is very prim. Calico Moom is very prim plus her Mom has a prim shop down stairs & there is a nice prim shop across the street.
    Love the OLD, UGLY, & WELL LOVED

  2. #52
    Senior Member Barbshobbies's Avatar
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    Our Wal-Mart never did bring back material after they promised us. We had a big over hall and were told it would be a Super Wal Mart with lots of material! What a disappointment when for a short while had pre-cut & packaged material, and very little in sewing suplies. We now have to drive 15 miles more to get to JoAnn`s. I like Joann`s on line, but every time I order 5 or 6 items, I only get 1 or 2, they say they are out of the rest, but when I check on line it`s still there but a a higher price, than when I ordered it. I did ask at the store and they said they were getting the bugs out, it sure is taking a long time. I have to hire some on to take me and hate to make them wait so I look at every thing, when they have nothing to buy there.

  3. #53
    Senior Member madamepurl's Avatar
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    We have 7 LQS in our immediate area. A new one was just added last year and may just be a nice tax right off for a Dr. of a high-end specialty in the area. The wife was told to "do something," so she opened a quilt shop. Really I'm not sure if this immediate area can support so many shops, but so far, no closings. I haven't even had a chance yet to make it to this new one, so really it may be a really nice shop.

    I agree with the showroom comments. I'm not sure how any brick and mortar shops like quilt shops or yarn shops are making it today. Books - unless they are a variety that don't get discounted - are basically useless today, I've seen people look at them and use their phones to order them up from Amazon.

    We actually have a plethora of shops in a 2 hour drive, so it does keep the prices competitive - still around the $10 - $10.50, even batiks. I would be happier if it was more around $7 - $8 mark, but those days are probably gone when gas and shipping got so high.
    - Rose

  4. #54
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    I prefer to feel the fabric, but my nearest quilt shop is 50 miles away. Our lqs closed in December....so sad!
    Some of the fabric that I looked at on my last visit was $14.99 per yard, so, at those prices, I won't be buying pieces do fabric just because I like it....I will need a pattern in mind. I am trying to use down my stash.

  5. #55
    Senior Member rush88888's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prim Quilts View Post
    I live near St. Louis, Missouri. Since the beginning of the year I know of five quilt shops that are either in the process of closing or just closed. That is just here in my area. Has anyone else noticed this happening in other areas? Plus, we lost one shop last April. Just wondering what is happening nationwide in the quilting industry.
    one reason i can think of it that there are opportunities to buy cheaper fabric from places like walmart, hancocks, jo-ann, etc. another reason is that on-line stores don't have the overhead, like what it takes to maintain a store, so they can charge less for their fabric.
    "perfection is the enemy of done."
    "the secret to having it all is knowing you already do."

  6. #56
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AUQuilter View Post
    ... should have called the $1 difference a markup......

    When I was little, we took all of our ironing out to a lady's home. She ironed for everyone in our little town using a glass coke bottle as her starch bottle with one of those cork sprinkler tops on it.
    I knew what you meant, I just wanted to point out the expenses part. Thanks for the compliments on our shop.

    Your story brought back memories of the lady that ironed my Mom’s clothes for her back in the 60s in Colorado. Her married sons were loggers and had a small sawmill up the river from our place. She lived in a short 8-ft wide trailer parked next to the log home of one son. She was always so cheerful, and was the perfect image of a Grandma. Whenever we arrived for a drop-off or pick-up, she would cheerfully call out loudly to “Come on in!”. She was a large, white-haired woman and was always dressed in a full-length flower-print cotton dress, at least that’s what I recall. She did her ironing while seated, and I don’t remember seeing her ever stand or walk. She had an ironing board, chair, and little b/w TV in the front “living room” of her trailer. The rest of the visible space was taken up with folk’s laundry baskets and clothes hanging racks. She loved to chit-chat and would talk your leg off. She always had her bottle with the cork sprinkler setting nearby too. I have my Mom’s old cork sprinkler that she used with a small vinegar bottle.

    My wife does most of the ironing at our shop. I help with starching once in a while, and press new hems in the jeans that I shorten. I was taught how to iron my own clothes as a teenager, and was the one that brought an iron and ironing board to the marriage of my wife & I 37 years ago. The iron went ka-put, but we still have the board.

    CD in Oklahoma
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
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  7. #57
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    Out of frustration of my favorite shops closing, I created www.QuiltersResources.net this past November in hopes of helping all quilting businesses. I think all of your points are valid, but the bottom line is that most shops don't have a budget for advertising, so we, as quilters, only hear about them word of mouth. I'm hoping my site will introduce quilters to new shops in their home state as well as shops in along their travels...shops that are not advertising in the expensive publications. I'm still adding information to the site, so it's no where close to being complete.

  8. #58
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    which quilt shops in the st louis are closed . i frequently visit st louis to see family . the only quilt shop i know of closing is patches in st charles missouri

  9. #59
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    I think more quilt shops are closing due to fabric and everything else being so expensive. Its sad that fabric prices have gone up so steeply.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prim Quilts View Post
    I live near St. Louis, Missouri. Since the beginning of the year I know of five quilt shops that are either in the process of closing or just closed. That is just here in my area. Has anyone else noticed this happening in other areas? Plus, we lost one shop last April. Just wondering what is happening nationwide in the quilting industry.
    If you don't mind a road trip, there are 2 quilt stores in Mexico, MO, one right up the road in Centralia, and at least 2 and maybe 3 in Columbia MO.

  11. #61
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by devert129 View Post
    .... I created www.QuiltersResources.net this past November in hopes of helping all quilting businesses. ....the bottom line is that most shops don't have a budget for advertising, so we, as quilters, only hear about them word of mouth.....
    Hi. Welcome to the Quilt Board.

    While I want to compliment you on your attempt to help shops get their name out without expensive advertising, I must say that there are a large number of these free-sign-up “directories” that have come and gone in past years, and all seem (in my opinion) to have two stumbling blocks that are hard to overcome. How do they keep the list current and accurate, and how do they get every shop to participate?

    While new shops are usually eager to find any & all free lists and register themselves, shops that close seldom see the need to remove their listing (and probably don’t even think about it), and in some cases, couldn’t remove a listing even if they wanted to on some directories. Most are set up so new listings can be added quickly online, but existing listings can’t be removed without contacting the directory owner. That’s probably not high on the list of things to do when folks have to close their shop.

    Ongoing shops that signed up years ago on various directories later discover that many are incomplete or contain errors, some haven’t been maintained or updated for years, and some have disappeared completely. Add to that the growing popularity of blogs, forums, and other social media where shop locations can be inquired about for more up-to-date information, include specific criteria of the shopper’s choice, and can even come with a recommendation from another quilter or quilters.

    CD in Oklahoma
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
    http://thayerrags.com/

  12. #62
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    Sad but true. We have lost a couple in the past 2-3 years. Just yesterday I went to one of my favorite places and purchased a little less than $150 worth of things for a t shirt quilt I am making. I bought only - at full price - what I absolutely had to have. The rest was all reduced pricing, etc. I love the local shops but when I can get fabric on line for 5-6$/yard and I see the exact same thing at the shop for 10-12$/yard guess which one I am going to buy?

  13. #63
    Super Member karate lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coffeebreak View Post
    Town I am in now is to small for a quilt shop to probably make any money. But I just moved up here from INland Empire of SO CA...big yuppy/middle class kind of location...Starbucks on every corner and a shopping mall on every intersection kind of place..and not a single quilt shop there! JOann's and Michaels is all!
    But I am not really surprised to hear them closing...I see online the fabrics are $10 a yard and more! If you quilt alot for personal hobby...unless you are making big bucks on your job..who can afford $10 a yard? I know I can't! I look online and there are tons of fabrics...I was just "eyeball shopping" this morning...WONDERFUL fabrics, but for $10 a yard or more, it is just window shopping for me. I can't afford that. I was wondering why places like Joann's doesn't carry more of the wonderful prints like you can get online, but I guess store space is the issue but still....I think it is the price. Odds are if it is $10 a yard online it is probably $12 or more in a store. And i just think people can't afford to spend that much for fabric. Maybe a little here and there or for aspeciality quilt or something like that, but just for every quilt you make...it is just to expensive. I don't understand why it is so expensive...I know quality and all that, but still...if is isn't selling at $10 a yard...why not lower the price and keep your out sourcings open?
    I too live in a small town (pop 450) so no shops. The $10. price tags keep me away from a lot of places, but that is why I shop on line with connecting threads and Fabric.com. Good prices and free shipping after a certain amount . (and I have NO problem reaching the amount) Also lots of yard sales and thrift store trips. Also people who know I quilt give me fabric. friend just gave me a basket full of some really nice yardage.

  14. #64
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    The $5.00/yard will be quickly be going the same way the #3.00/yard did, as most all of the new fabrics are coming in at $5.50-$6.00/yard and when you add freight of .35-.50/yard depending on where they are shipped from, this means the cost of fabric for the LQS is going to run $5.85-$6.50 per yard. No one likes to lose money so many places will mark at cost just to get some of their money back.
    I own a quilt shop and I just closed my large store and built a 1200 sq.ft. warehouse style building. Nothing like what I had, but I am in the midst of re-aligning my pricing structure and will have nothing on 45" bolts over $8.50/yard. It has been a hard thing to do but I recognized that I am not getting any younger, just turned 65, and I just couldn't keep up the 12-14 hour days and 6 days a week.
    I had such an outcry from my customers that I decided to be open 3 days a week for them. If they don't support the shop now, I will re-evaluate in a year and it will close and become my studio and I will do some designing and quilting.
    OzarksGma

  15. #65
    Super Member ThayerRags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OzarksGma View Post
    ....I just closed my large store and built a 1200 sq.ft. warehouse style building...outcry from my customers.... I decided to be open 3 days a week... If they don't support the shop now, I will re-evaluate in a year and it will close and become my studio and I will do some designing and quilting.
    Thanks for posting OzarksGma.

    Am I right in guessing that your new warehouse building is also next to your home so you don’t have to commute to a store? Did you offer any services (Longarm, alterations, sewing) at your big store, or will you now in the smaller building? I see you said that if you close the business you may use it as a studio.

    We’re set up to do about the same thing if need be, and have talked about it, except we’ll probably look at turning our retail shop into a retail warehouse if the time comes. It’s only 6 blocks from our home, and is an old style brick building in what used to be part of a bustling downtown shopping area. It’s not too much larger than your warehouse building at 1700 sq.ft., but has a 14-ft high ceiling in it, so we can go fairly high if we’re just operating as a warehouse.

    We do ironing, alterations, mending, and repairs in our retail shop now, and it’s about 25% of our business. If we get to where we don’t want to do the services, we’ll probably convert to a warehouse-type retail sales operation. We’d have the added cost of an online shopping cart website, but I do all of our website work now anyway and would probably continue to do so. Cutting fabric and filling orders should take a lot less time than the 9+ hrs/day, 5-days/week that we’re working now.

    If worse comes to worst, we’ll turn it into our personal fabric stash, and maybe have the biggest one in the area. Everything’s paid for, so we can lock the doors anytime that we want to.

    CD in Oklahoma
    "I sew, I sew, so it's off to work I go!!!"
    ThayerRags Fabric Center
    http://thayerrags.com/

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