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Old 04-08-2014, 11:16 AM
  #11  
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the guild i belong to has "circles" that allow for that small group, initmate quilting experience. check for something like that with the guild you choose. some of our circles are "arty", some groups work on the same project, some groups just get together and do their thing. i belong to the third kind of circle.

the other thing i recommend is to jump in with both feet and volunteer for something. you do not need to be president the first year, but find some small job that you can get involved with. this really allows you to meet a lot of people.

hope your search goes well and you are able to further your quilting and friendship goals.
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Old 04-08-2014, 11:34 AM
  #12  
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I was a member of two different quilt guilds for some 20 years. Each had it's own quirks and flavor. The one I enjoyed the most was almost an hour drive from my home but met in the daytime. They had a covered dish luncheon every meeting. They started with a business meeting at 10:00 in the morning. They usually had a speaker or some kind of demonstration or other program each meeting. Most of the members were laid back and I always felt comfortable there. They were started by Mimi Dietrich and her friend Norma Campbell. Both are nationally known quilters at least in our neck of the woods. Mimi is a darling lady. The guild usually took two months off during the summer months. The second group was only a 20 or so minute drive from my home. They met in the evening. A lot of their members were a lot more uptight about quilting etc. Their dues were more and they had lots of stuff they more than urged you to participate in. One of the things that bothered me was their "block of the month". The girl who ran it liked to pick hard blocks and she had lots of rules. She insisted on certain colors and you were often required to purchase the fabric needed from her. The one I hated the most was that if you won you had to participate every month for the next year. As a person who likes the hand quilting part of quilting above everything else that didn't suit me. I sort of stopped going to the first guild that was the farthest away as I got older and the trip seemed longer and longer especially in less than perfect weather. The second group met at night and many times I was just to tired. The main reason I quit that one was the last Christmas Party of theirs I attended. They met us at the door with a box of numbers. We had to draw a number and sit at that table for the evening. I ended up with a whole table full of girls I only knew by face. I wanted to spend the evening with my closest quilting buddies as the guild meetings were where I saw them the most. A mixer would have been alright any other night. I advice you to go to a meeting and get the feel of the group. If they don't make you feel welcome or start making demands immediately "run".
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Old 04-08-2014, 12:22 PM
  #13  
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I totally agree with jumping in to help. Our guild has a quilt show in even numbered years. There are so many tasks that need to be done - many of which don't take much time, but the sheer number means that a small group can't do them (for instance - sitting at the table for 2 hours during the show selling tickets, or helping hang the show or take-down). Gus and I have helped with take-down the past 2 shows and this helped me learn lots of member names.

For that last show, I took a day off work to help with the judging and spent the day as a Scribe for the judge - writing comments as fast as I could (there were four of us scribing for her so I learned a lot about every fourth quilt...). That was a fantastic learning experience as well as getting to know other guild members during the day.

I now share Hospitality duties with another member - I coordinate the Summer Ice Cream Social and she coordinates the Winter Potluck. It works well for the two of us.

Cheers, K
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Old 04-08-2014, 12:33 PM
  #14  
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Dive right in to whichever Guild feels right for you. I would try several out and see. Joining a Guild is like joining any Social group or Church. You'll get along with some people and not with others. It's the small group settings and working together that you'll get to know members. If you only attend meetings and not join in, you may go for years and no one will ever know your name. I know my Guild has a reputation for not being friendly but when there are 70 or 80 people in a meeting, it's impossible to talk with everyone. So I belong to a smaller Bee with 24 people, those are my friends. I even belong to a group of 4 people who get together in our homes once a month.

mpspeedy, we had that one at a Christmas party too, It was horrible! We drew out of a basket a little piece of fabric and you had to sit at the table with a larger piece of the same fabric. It split up groups and I didn't even get to wish a Merry Christmas to some friends. Totally wrong party idea.

Last edited by toverly; 04-08-2014 at 12:36 PM.
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Old 04-08-2014, 01:17 PM
  #15  
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I totally agree. Go and check them both out. Each guild is run differently. Some are mor business and stuffy while others are laid back and one big happy family. The guild I belong to has a variety of activities. Sit and sew, classes by members as well as authored teachers. We do charity quilts, have our annual Christmas party and just enjoy the camaraderie. Some members just come for the social aspects while others come for the classes. If one meeting is not your cup of tea, wait, the next may be right up your alley.

Have fun and I hope you find a guild that suits you.
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Old 04-08-2014, 02:37 PM
  #16  
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I could not stand quilting without the friendships I've built in the 8 or so different guilds I've belonged to over the years as I've moved around the country! Most guilds are invaluable for the information and skill imparted by the members and workshops they have, let alone the times of friendship and fellowship with like-minded people. Get involved with the show and any other programs they have, it's the best way to meet people in smaller settings. Ask if there is a membership chairperson and introduce yourself to them. Ask if there is a mentor/mentee program within the guild that can help you assimilate or suggest starting one.

Jan in VA
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Old 04-08-2014, 03:03 PM
  #17  
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Thanks Jan. I will post back next week after the first meeting!

kitty
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Old 04-08-2014, 05:27 PM
  #18  
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I am a member of Mid Valley Quilt Guild, have met so many quilters this way. I also go to my Senior Center for Sew & So every Monday afternoon. I love both!!!
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Old 04-08-2014, 06:18 PM
  #19  
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Lots of good advice here -- our guild president always asks if there are any new people, they then introduce themselves. Be sure you sit at a table with others and join in the conversation! Don't expect people to seek you out because you are new but they will enjoy talking to you at their table.
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Old 04-09-2014, 03:07 AM
  #20  
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Word of advice to shy people. I hope that you are participating in Show & Tell. That is a great icebreaker! You will have instant rapport. You cannot just sit there and expect others to approach you. It works both ways. A project or two for S &T will open doors.

i am an extrovert and I try to bring out others BUT if I don't get feedback...well...i move on.

sandy
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