Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 76

Thread: quilting not for me

  1. #1
    Junior Member seazteddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    pa
    Posts
    172

    quilting not for me

    Do you have to be perfectionist to quilt? That's not me.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    4
    No. Only if you want to be competetive.
    I am far from being a perfectionist. My motto is finished is better than perfect and the friends who get my quilts never see any errors, even though they are glaring to me.
    If you enjoy your sewing, just do it. Remember, there are no quilt police, and we all improve as we go. Just enjoy it.

  3. #3
    Senior Member sewingitalltogether's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Washington, Michigan
    Posts
    939
    I'm a "kinda sorta person" and that's how I quilt. Although I seem to have some organization process. Pre-planning.

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    3,286
    If a person needed to be a perfectionist to quilt, I could not quilt. I'm into quilting for the fun of it. Love the process from picking fabrics to the last stitch in the binding. I don't look for mistakes, just to the enjoyment of having something colorful and useful.

  5. #5
    Senior Member tallchick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    727
    The beautiful thing about quilting is that it allows the maker free reign to do as they please I have never read anywhere that quilts must be perfect. Relax and enjoy the process, there are no quilt police.
    Lisa

  6. #6
    Super Member Maureen NJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Morris Plains, NJ
    Posts
    1,574
    Blog Entries
    1
    You don’t have to be a perfectionist if you choose the right pattern. E.g. you would not choose a star pattern where the points come together. There are plenty of patterns out there for you.

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Northern Indiana
    Posts
    1,993
    Blog Entries
    14
    If you can't see a error in the quilt when you're on a horse galloping by, it's all good.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Sunny Florida
    Posts
    1,737
    Quilting is a personal journey. I look back on prior mistakes as a learning lesson and move on. I try to do my best with all projects. I have also learned to relax and enjoy the ride.

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Heart of Colorado's majestic mountains!
    Posts
    5,894
    If you are "casual' about other areas in your life you will be 'casual' about being perfect in your quilting or other crafting. And, you will be happy with the outcome. You get to choose your own comfort level about sewing, cleaning, organization, etc. You are the only one who gets to choose. I hope you will enjoy sewing or quilting at whatever state of perfection or casualness that you are happy with. I enjoy that philosophy in my life.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Alturas, CA
    Posts
    8,780
    Quilting is supposed to be fun. I don't know of any perfect quilters, actually I don't know of any perfect person. LOL If you're new to quilting and are concerned about it, don't worry, you'll get better. I've been quilting for about 15 years and have definitely improved over the years, but it's still not close to perfect.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Northern IN
    Posts
    460
    That is the beauty of quilting. Nobody can tell you, you can't do it that way. For me, I like the slow and steady route. I like seams to match up and points to be present. Does it always happen, no, but I strive for it to. I think when things do match up and I do follow a pattern it makes it easier and more enjoyable in the long run. Quilt making is a process that builds on itself and if you take care of the details along the way you won't have to stress how to make it come together in the end. My friend is fast and casual and I am fine with that. She is happy and I am happy.

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,962
    Are you kidding?! No quilt is perfect! I'll even bet that the fancy ones hanging in the best quilt shows have a few mistakes! Relax, enjoy the process of making them, and the warmth and love the bring.

  13. #13
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    8,574
    The word perfect isn't in my vocabulary and I'm really glad. It would take the fun out of so many things for me.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    862
    Some of our quilting ancestors were so good they probably could have made a perfect quilt. But that would be challenging the creator so they included deliberate mistakes. I personally never let perfect get in the way of good enough.
    Vic Tori Ann Work Shop

  15. #15
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Carroll, Iowa
    Posts
    2,265
    I've been told there is no "perfect" quilt which I'm glad to hear about but I do try to be as perfect as possible. I know I can't stitch a straight line to save my life but I do the best I can and make it work. I quilt my own quilts and I have robotics but from time to time I don't make accurate moves or choices, still no problem but I do try to work around it and better my techniques with every quilt I make. Of course my quilts will never be in a quilt show and that doesn't matter to me as I make my quilts as gifts to others and I know they will be happy to receive it knowing all the work that went into it. They won't look for the flaws........which is good to know, they'll look at all the love I put into it to make it special just for them. That's what matters to me.
    Suz in Iowa
    Designer EPIC, Brother XR3140
    Babylock Evolve, Innova 26" LS, MQR
    ProQ Designer, EQ7, Embird

  16. #16
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    34,877
    In all my many years quilting, I have yet to make a “ perfect” quilt.

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    4,095
    Heavens No! The Quilt Police will tell you that you do and the competitive people who quilt for Shows will tell you that you do. But the joy of creativity overwhelms the critics. Like Nike commercials, Just do it. Have fun. Watch a few Jenny Doan tutorials and you will see how to have fun with it.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 04-11-2019 at 08:01 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Near Seattle, WA
    Posts
    681
    One of the ladies in my small group is an improvisational quilter. Her blocks are similar but do not exactly match. Depending on what she is doing, her seams don't necessarily match. She has a great eye for color, loves to have a sense of movement, and her quilts are always gorgeous.

    I'm a bit more precise/perfectionist/OCD whatever you wish to call me. But I'm also dealing with progressive vision loss. My best quilts are probably behind me, but I have years of quilting ahead of me (I hope!). I'm trying different styles like string quilts where matching isn't so important. I use techniques now that I used to call "fabric wasteful" like making half square triangles by taking two squares, drawing a line down the middle and sewing on that line, cutting off the excess, instead of cutting triangles and piecing them together "properly". Because I can't read rulers well any more, I make a lot of templates and what I call "snubs" which is a template of what to cut off rather than what to keep.

    But my biggest advice for new quilters is to work really hard at a consistent seam allowance. A basic 9-patch is probably not what drew you in, but it is a great thing to use to work on those matching seams and seam allowance. I really stress what I call "driving practice" to new quilters. Learn your machine, develop your hand/eye coordination, and learn that seam allowance! You don't get to drive the Indy 500 with a learner's permit. When I first started quilting I was self-taught, it was before rotary cutters, I came from a garment construction background and I used a 1/2" seam for years as 1/4" seemed so impossibly tiny.

    Been quilting some 40 years now, and while some projects have gone together easily and well, I've never made a perfect quilt either. I believe I can/could... but LOL never had to add a mistake, those just happen naturally. But what I've learned is how to work around those issues and make a quilt of lasting beauty and comfort. For me the end goal is a usable quilt, not a wall hanging.

    Realize that being close up with your project magnifies its flaws to you. Step back, let some time pass and it will all be just fine. It's that thing Sandy said early in the thread, if you can't notice the flaw from 6 feet away from a galloping horse, there is no flaw! And as one of my other small group members says friends don't look for flaws, they look for love and they see the love

  19. #19
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    10,452
    Why do you think that? That mindset is crippling. If I let the thought of not doing something perfect stop me then I'd have a dull life for sure.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  20. #20
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    10,452
    Quote Originally Posted by betthequilter View Post
    I believe I've heard that the Amish always put a mistake in their quilts because they believe only God could make something perfect?
    An Amish person told me that was not true. No Amish would ever presume they could make something as perfect as God could so no deliberate mistake was needed. She had no idea how that myth got started but she has heard it all her life and no Amish wants to be perceived to others as they think they can be perfect.

    Some of the best workmanship in quilts I have seen have been made by Japanese quilters.
    Last edited by Onebyone; 04-11-2019 at 06:17 AM.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  21. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    172
    I am a perfectionist in some areas of my life because what I do for a living demands it, but I also recognize that I am human and humans aren't perfect. When I'm quilting, also because of where I am in my life right now, I'm in the have fun, get it done, make something of good quality someone can enjoy, and move on to the next project. For most of us, this is a hobby and something we do because we enjoy it. It definitely doesn't have to be perfect. Let go of the perfectionism if it's not an aspect that you enjoy.

    Some people really enjoy getting perfect points and will rip out the seam and try again to get it perfect. I rarely ever rip unless it's something I really can't live with, like joining 2 rows and being off by an inch If I get a perfect point, yay me! If I don't, meh it'll quilt out anyway. No one is ever going to pick on you about whether or not your seams match or if your points are pointy unless you ask them to - like a judge in a quilt show.

    So, it's your hobby. Please enjoy it! Delight in it. Rub your face in the fabric - I know I do sometimes!! I definitely go pet some fabric when my tots are being monsters and they love to come in the guest/fabric room with me to pet fabric so everyone can calm down. Rejoice in those perfect points when you get them, and if the points really frustrate you - there are tons of quilts that don't require points

    Forgot to add: There is a really great book called The Improv Handbook for Modern Quilters (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/16...?ie=UTF8&psc=1) if this is more your style of quilting. I bought the book because I was inspired by this quilt: http://patchthegiraffe.blogspot.com/...t-score-9.html There is some great advice in the book about letting go and being free to cut and piece. It was a great read even if you never make any of the projects out of it.
    Last edited by Sephie; 04-11-2019 at 07:07 AM. Reason: Forgot Link!

  22. #22
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    21,925
    Does one need to be a perfectionist? Short answer - no.

    But I am happier with my work when it turns out to be " good enough for me".

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    400
    If you think you have to make a perfect quilt then quilting is not for you because you will be disappointed over and over.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Cheshirepat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    315
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    An Amish person told me that was not true. No Amish would ever presume they could make something as perfect as God could so no deliberate mistake was needed. She had no idea how that myth got started but she has heard it all her life and no Amish wants to be perceived to others as they think they can be perfect.

    Some of the best workmanship in quilts I have seen have been made by Japanese quilters.
    Agreed, all you have to do is look at some of the amazing quilt show pictures from Japan - the level of talent and skill amazes me!

    See now, with the story about the Amish/imperfection thing, I always thought it was a flattering thing, because their work is so good, fairly impeccable! Not that they *claimed* it, just that their reputation as craftspeople was worthy...

    Goodness knows I'm a zillion light-years from perfection myself. I think I've come to realize and accept the things I do will never be show-worthy let alone perfect. Nonetheless I like the *practice* of quilt making, as I'm always learning things. And in the end I end up with a perfectly serviceable object, right?
    *this space for rent*

  25. #25
    Super Member osewme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,290
    The short answer to your questions is no! I would venture to say that even quilters who have won top prizes in top quilt shows have imperfections in their quilts. After the quilt is washed you will find that so many of the things you see as mistakes will just blend right in & not ever be noticed. When I first started quilting & gave a quilt away I would always point out my mistakes to the recipient. Finally I came to my senses & realized that most people don't even see the obvious mistakes that I make on quilts & more important than that, they don't care about mistakes...only about the fact that I made them something special. So my suggestion to you is don't ever apologize for a mistake on a quilt or point it out to others. You will feel much better & so will the one who receives it.
    Just do what makes you happy & enjoy your new found hobby.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.