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Thread: Quilting problem - t-shirt quilt

  1. #1
    Senior Member carol45's Avatar
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    Quilting problem - t-shirt quilt

    I'm making a t-shirt quilt. I sandwiched it using Elmer's glue, and I'm quilting a square grid of straight stitches every 4 inches. Everything was going fine until I went over a section of a t-shirt that had a rubbery logo. It seems that the walking foot did not move smoothly over the shirt, but dragged it a bit, so things bunched up. I need to pull out those stitches, but I would like advice as to how to requilt it in those areas (there are a few other rubbery logos). Here are some options that I'm considering:
    1. I have a teflon foot that I could try, but I'm worried about it not being a walking foot.
    2. I might be able to quilt it from the back, but I'm afraid that the rubbery surface would stick to my sewing machine table--I used to have a supreme slider, but it never worked well for me--I'd end up sewing it into my quilt :-(--maybe parchment paper underneath?
    3. Or maybe I could put some washable stabilizer on top of the surface and sew over it.
    I'd really appreciate any other suggestions, or which you think of the above I should try first.
    Thanks,
    Carol
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  2. #2
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    Just a thought...maybe cover rubbery area with tissue, sew, then tear off tissue.... I haven't done a t shirt quilt in awhile, but when I did I steered clear of the heavy rubbery areas ....

  3. #3
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    I don't sew over the rubbery logos either... I go around them. They are hard for the needle to penetrate and that drag on your needle can mess up stitch timing. You may have to stop your 'grid' at the edge of the rubbery logo and pick it back up on the other side.
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    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I never stitch over the decals on tshirt quilts, I stitch around them. I've never found a successful way to manage the rubbery decals. Not only a mess to stitch through but also unrepairable damage to the decal when you have to unsew. The holes do not close up. It's good that you stopped right away
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  5. #5
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    I would try laying a sheet of tissue paper over the logo and use the walking foot or your Teflon foot if the walking foot rips the paper. Whenever possible go around the decals.

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    I'm in the middle of gathering t-shirts for my nephew. I've looked at the different videos on YouTube involving logos. They all advise using batting that calls for up to 10 inch spacing. Many use a flannel sheet for the batting or no batting and just a heavier backing.

  7. #7
    Senior Member carol45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tessagin View Post
    I'm in the middle of gathering t-shirts for my nephew. I've looked at the different videos on YouTube involving logos. They all advise using batting that calls for up to 10 inch spacing. Many use a flannel sheet for the batting or no batting and just a heavier backing.
    I'm using this youtube video, and the products that she recommends.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fW6vlC-qr4Q&t=3640s
    I love the way it's turning out except for this problem. The batting calls for 5", but I like the way it feels. If I were ever to do a t-shirt quilt again, the 10" spacing certainly has its appeal! :-)

  8. #8
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    Quilt those parts from the back, with tissue paper over them so they will slide. Tissue paper tears off easily.

  9. #9
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    Popover has probably the best solution. Like most others, I don't quilt over those rubbery logos either and find that a simply meander with a seperate border treatment works pretty darn well.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewbizgirl View Post
    I don't sew over the rubbery logos either... I go around them. They are hard for the needle to penetrate and that drag on your needle can mess up stitch timing. You may have to stop your 'grid' at the edge of the rubbery logo and pick it back up on the other side.
    Thatt is what I do..................

  11. #11
    Senior Member stitch678's Avatar
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    I think sewing over tissue paper with the teflon foot would work...the walking foot might try to bumch up the paper.

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    Tissue paper will work.

  13. #13
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    I keep a stack of tissue paper for this type of problem. I have a box that I throw all the big cutaway pieces from clothing patterns in. Also, any extra gift wrap tissue. It is easy to tear away after I stitch but provides a nice glide to the foot. But, when I work on vinyl, I use a teflon foot and don't usually have a problem.

  14. #14
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    I have made a lot of T-shirt quilts and I do try to avoid stitching over the design areas. What I use when I have to stitch near them or for some other reason must get close, is waxed paper; kitchen variety. It's cheap, see thru and the stitching foot glides right over it. It also tears away easily. To tear it away, I run the point of my seam ripper along the stitching line, give it a tug and off it comes.
    The reason I sometimes have to sew near the design is that I like to "quilt" each T-shirt design by stitching around it and highlighting different sections of the logo before I stitch the squares together into the quilt top or add the sashing strips if using them.
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  15. #15
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    I've used tissue paper to stitch on vinyl and its worked great. You just tear it off when you are done.
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  16. #16
    Senior Member cindi's Avatar
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    Stitch around the logos. It really makes them "pop" and stand out.
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  17. #17
    Senior Member just janet's Avatar
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    I've made 4 t-shirt quilts and always stitch around the logo. I also think waxed paper is good for stitching over the designs but really don't recommend it.

  18. #18
    Senior Member carol45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildyard View Post
    I have made a lot of T-shirt quilts and I do try to avoid stitching over the design areas. What I use when I have to stitch near them or for some other reason must get close, is waxed paper; kitchen variety. It's cheap, see thru and the stitching foot glides right over it. It also tears away easily. To tear it away, I run the point of my seam ripper along the stitching line, give it a tug and off it comes.
    The reason I sometimes have to sew near the design is that I like to "quilt" each T-shirt design by stitching around it and highlighting different sections of the logo before I stitch the squares together into the quilt top or add the sashing strips if using them.
    I tried the wax paper and it worked like a charm! I had a box of waxed paper around that I've been looking to use up, anyway, because I like parchment paper better for baking. When I run out of it, I'll probably use tissue paper. Thanks to all so much! You saved me! Once again this group came through for me!

  19. #19
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by just janet View Post
    I've made 4 t-shirt quilts and always stitch around the logo. I also think waxed paper is good for stitching over the designs but really don't recommend it.
    Since I always use the waxed paper, I am just curious why you don't recommend it. Have you had issues with it that so far I have been lucky to avoid? If anyone has had a problem, let me know so hopefully I can be aware up front. LOL
    Linda Wedge White

    I believe UFOs are like scraps, ferns and dust bunnies. Once you get two, they send spores out into the air and more just happen anywhere the spores meet.

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