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Thread: quilting squares AFTER binding is complete

  1. #1
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    quilting squares AFTER binding is complete

    I am almost finished with a quilt top and will be assembling the sandwich. I plan to stitch in the ditch - I have 21 rows of 21 6 inch squares - no sashing. And I am staggering the rows - not lining up to each other. After I stitch all of the lines of each block and I finish the binding - can I go back and use free motion in each block?

  2. #2
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    why not just do 2 1/2 inch straight stitches prior to binding. I have seen many of the modern quilts that way and it looks great.

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    like just doing the 2 1/2" lines down each line and then across also? THat would work I guess. Thanks!

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    I've never done any free motion quilting so I thought I might just try it out - I think I'll make a little practice sandwich block

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    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    Sure you can - the SITD will keep anything from shifting. Personally, I like to do the binding last just as a 'finish'. No, that's the label - make the binding next to last. FMQ is fun - just go for it.

  6. #6
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    Sally, you sure can add free motion quilting after you are done with your binding and SITD stuff. Nothing wrong with this!

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    Power Poster Mariposa's Avatar
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    Go for it! It can be a creative experiment for you!
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  8. #8
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    Of course you can quilt after you do the binding. However, since you have essentially basted by SID you need to be very careful that adding new quilting after the binding doesnt cause some bunching of the backing and even the top. There is no where for puckering to go unless you are very careful. I have done it but added pins to the area where I am quilting to make sure the layers are even in the specific place the additional quilting is being done.

  9. #9
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    All of you say, just go for it. Im still only on doing squiggly lines fmq. It maight take yrs. For me to just go for it.

  10. #10
    Senior Member alisonquilts's Avatar
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    I frequently put the binding on before I am totally finished the quilting - because I like to hand sew in the evening (watching TV, or sitting by the fire) and now that I am machine quilting everything I don't have nearly as much hand work to do. However, I won't do this if I have any quilting left that will come within 1/2 inch of the sewing line holding the binding on, because there is too much chance of puckering (as Holice pointed out). I feel that if there is quilting to be done within a block (or any space) that has already been outlined with quilting the additional quilting needs to "float" without touching the existing quilting lines. This seems to become more important with increasing quilt size: if I do this experiment with small practice samples I never have problems, but when you add in the weight and drag of a larger quilt it seems to increase the chance of puckering.

    Alison
    Last edited by alisonquilts; 03-18-2013 at 03:31 PM.

  11. #11
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnie View Post
    All of you say, just go for it. Im still only on doing squiggly lines fmq. It maight take yrs. For me to just go for it.
    So you're talking about finishing the quilt, possibly using it for awhile, and then, when you feel more comfortable with FMQ, adding more quilting way down the road? I don't see what difference the length of time between finishing and adding more quilting would make. Weeks, months, years...should make no difference to the quilt.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

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    The problem with doing the FMQ after the binding you will probably have a lot of bunching of the fabric. Once you bind there is no place for the fabric to go (to even out). This also why most start in the middle doing any type of quilting and working their way out to the sides. It's your quilt so you can do what you want but you may have this problem.
    Judy

  13. #13
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    I didn't think about the bunching puckering. I think I'll stick to some straight lines for now on this quilt. I will make some practice sandwiches.. thanks.

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    I think I would work on my FMQing before attempting it on a piece this size. It sounds like it's a very large quilt and will be hard to move on your machine. I would start with potholders, table runners or place mats and work my way up to larger projects.

  15. #15
    Junior Member Suzette316's Avatar
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    I've gone back and added FMQ lots of times on quilts that have already been bound, no problems! If this is your very first time doing FMQ, just practice on something prior to putting this quilt under the machine. It's easier than most people think. Just breathe! When we concentrate, we hold our breath and when we hold our breath, we tense up - not good for FMQ. So put on some music you like and hum or sing along while FMQ to keep yourself breathing and relaxed.
    Last edited by Suzette316; 03-20-2013 at 03:52 AM.

  16. #16
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    I think the comments about the possibility of puckers on the backing being a problem if the binding is added before the quilting is complete is interesting-and misleading. She has already stabilized the quilt by STID. You can see if there is the possibility of puckers by looking carefully at the back after the STID. That is where the puckers would back up-not at the edge of the quilt. Personally, I do it this way all of the time. I do enjoy binding and I like to get rid of all the bulk of the added 2-4 inches all around-especially the extra batting. I think adding the quilting after the STID gives opportunity to do as intricate patterns as I want-its not daunting. Right now I am doing one with 48 squares and try to do one or two squares each day. For me the key is being very careful about the basting process. I have packed away the safety pins because of their weight and always having to stop to remove them. Sometimes I thread baste, quilt over it and them remove it when I finish. I also like the glue method.

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    I did a large quilt last week, 84-92", and glue basted it with School Glue on my bed. It was on the bed sideways, and I did half at a time after I had a few pins showing where the middle was. When it was dry, it went to the sewing machine like one piece of whole cloth. I FMQ'ed the whole thing in a few hours, with not one pin to take out, and not one pucker on the back. I thinned the glue with about half water, which made it a lot easier to get out of the bottle. Didn't even have to squeeze. I will surely do that again.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

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    ohhhh I love the glue idea. I'm gonna try it on my next quilt.

    Faith

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    You could even do "quilt in the hoop" for each block and make it go really fast and easy. FMQ should work also.

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    I love this glue idea!!! I use it in sewing a lot now and I love it for my quilt peojects! I just learned about this a few months ago and School Glue is a staple in my sewing studio now. Wish I had it forty years ago. My favorite use for it is to glue in knit sleves before I serge them in making American girl doll clothes. So fast and sets a perfet little sleeve.

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    I've heard a number of quilt teachers say that quilting makes the quilt shrink a bit, and for that reason, binding is done last. But, hey, if it works for you, go for it.

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    Sure you can.....

  23. #23
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    Yes you can... I've done this before when I felt the finished quilt didn't quite have enough quilting.
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