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Thread: Quilts as wedding gifts

  1. #26
    Senior Member
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    We run that risk when we give away a quilt, like putting a child out for adoption. After we put hundreds of hours into something, it be comes part of you. Only give it to someone who cares. Many don't even have a clue. Todays socity has become a "throw away" society and few value these things we cherish. I must admit, I didn't realize how much work went into quilting until I made them myself.
    Years ago, I rode horses (a lot) and my dear little neighbor lady quilted a saddle pad for my horse, for under the saddle. Looking back, she must have loved me a lot, or my horse. Thank you Mrs. Long.
    Donna Quilts
    We help the wounded soldiers.

  2. #27
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LynnVT View Post
    If I bought someone a gift, I wouldn't leave the price sticker on it, so why would do that? I only give a quilt when I know the person wants it. Making it a surprise is very risky. It might mean they would feel obliged to display it even if it's not their taste, or they might just pack it away. Cost is less important than the pleasure someone would have in the gift. Maybe if they love you, they are touched by your kindness, but you need to be very sensitive to what they like, not just what you do. If they have a registry, look at what they asked for and try to find out their color choices, decorating style, etc. If you already know they like traditional stuff, you might be safer. I asked my daughters what they wanted, some were very specific, as they were later with baby quilts. One appreciates whatever I give her and loves the appliqued tree of life I designed for her.

    I agree with this completely. Adding the price seems tacky to me, plus you will be out an appraisal fee. If there is any reason to doubt that your gift will be appreciated, why do it at all? Almost everyone these days uses a bridal registry. Save yourself potential grief, and save the gift of your talents for those you know will be deserving.

  3. #28
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    I find this thread interesting especially this week as I will be giving two wedding quilts this weekend, both of my DD's are getting married this summer and they are having a shared shower this weekend. They know the value of quilts as they have been here for many years watching them being made. I tend to give quilts at the bridal showers because there you do get to see the reactions, at the weddings so many times anymore they donot open the gifts. Which IMHO is quite boring. Both my girls still live with DH and myself, and one of the girls asked if they were getting wedding quilts, I said why do you ask, she replied mom everyone gets one of your quilts when they get married. (Ha Ha) I can't believe she isn't more observant than that. I worked on one all fall and winter long almost every evening, and now it has mysterously disappered. Can't hardly wait to see their reactions.

  4. #29
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    I only give quilts to who I know will appreciate the work I put into it. Usually family and mostly baby quilts.

  5. #30
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    In our society there are so many divorces that i do not give quilts as wedding gifts i use to but not anymore

  6. #31
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    The last quilt I had appraised was for $1200 and I know many quilters who would never assign such a price to their quilt. When lost, stolen or destroyed, their insurance would never come close to that amount without an appraisal. Newlyweds do not always have the extra money for an appraisal and MAY appreciate this being part of the gift. When I sell quilts the appraisal is a huge help in determining a price and value to the buyer. At least that is how I look at it!
    Debbie
    Machine It

  7. #32
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    But if the house DOES burn down, would you accept the appraisal value to make a replacement ?

  8. #33
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    Okay so I'm new to quilting and as I'm reading this I'm think other than the fabric my quilts really cant be worth much. But maybe one day they might actually be worth something. So where would you go and get a estimate on a quilt?

    Diane

  9. #34
    Super Member Ruby the Quilter's Avatar
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    I'm finishing a quilt for a friend of my daughter. I asked for the colors and she hopes this quilt will be handed down to her children. I was touched by her words. She definitely will cherish this quilt.
    Quilting in the Desert

  10. #35
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alisonquilts View Post
    I'm gonna play devil's advocate here for a moment:

    When we originally got our house appraised (as first time homebuyers, 15 years ago), and when I got some antique (and terribly battered) books appraised this spring, and when I watched Antiques Roadshow on various occasions, I was startled by the subjectivity of the process. Ultimately an item is as valuable as the market says it is...and it is in an appraiser's best interest to give you a high number. I fully agree that quilt labor is seriously undervalued, but it is also consistently undervalued, which suggests that the market is setting a value that no amount of appraisals is going to change! I wish it were otherwise.

    I would also be a tiny bit afraid that poverty-stricken newlyweds might see a high number on the appraisal ticket, and try to sell their brand new quilt! (Cynical me.)

    Alison

    "poverty stricken" newyweds??? The ones I come in contact with have purchased their newly constructed house prior to their "special day", she has a rock on her finger and the wedding is over the top. And yes, some of these "poor" newlyweds are shortly out of college and not employed but they have to have it all!

    Frankly, unless the hppy couple is actively part of the quilt construction ( input on design, colors etc) I am not taking a chance on giving them a quilt. It implies that they are obligated to use it even if they don't like it. My 2 cents

    While I can understand the desire to show the happy couple hw much the quilt appraised fr, I'm not sure of what the impact will be. Like that rock on Her finger, appraised Values are always inflated for insurance purposes. Now that s a reason to include it. Insure it!

    As another poster pointed out.....market price is what someone is willing to pay. I learned this in my marketing class oh so many years ago. So true!
    Sandy



    Sandy
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome 3160 QVC/ Janome 1100D serger, Juki 2020 Mini
    Singer Centennial model (inherited from my late, fav aunt!)

  11. #36
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by turner0106 View Post
    Okay so I'm new to quilting and as I'm reading this I'm think other than the fabric my quilts really cant be worth much. But maybe one day they might actually be worth something. So where would you go and get a estimate on a quilt?

    Diane
    Diane,

    With fabric costing $10-$15 per yard and batting $15-$30 a yard, that is not cheap. Add in the cost of machine quilting (assuming you don't have your own longarm - a significant investment) at $100+++, the value of a quilt just for the monetary investment of the quilter isn't small change. Unfortunately, many people see the $40 quilts at Wal-Mart and think that is the value of a custom-made, hand-crafted quilt and treat them as such. To find out the value of a quilt, it needs to be appraised by a certified quilt appraiser.

  12. #37
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    Thanks for the response Farm Quilter but where do you find someone to appraise a quilt?

    Thanks
    Diane

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