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Thread: Rag Quilt?

  1. #1
    Super Member wendiq's Avatar
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    Rag Quilt?

    I am going to make a rag quilt from a kit. It instructs me to cut the squares 10" with a 9" filler (I've used a flannel). My question is about the washing. Can I do it safely in my home washer and dryer or should I try to find a commercial place to do it? Any suggestions about doing this or anything else regarding sewing this together will be appreciated. Thank you, in advance, for your input....

  2. #2
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    I've always done them in my washer at home without any problems. You can also do them with fleece. You don't get the fraying but it curls at the ends; still a cute look. You can make the blocks the size you want; I think mine were a little smaller but the filler is about an inch smaller. You sew an X thru them before sewing them together. I keep a tote of different ones sewen together for when I need a quick gift. I've also had print on one side and solids on the other and then appliqued designs on the solid side. Do a search here and you'll get tons of tips on this. Good luck on it.
    Judy

  3. #3
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    I have made several rag quilts and just used my home washer and dryer. There is so much lint that comes off them that if I was going to make a quilt that was larger than lap size I would use a commercial washer and dryer. One thing I have learned is that after you get them all clipped and before you wash them put it in the dryer and run it a cycle dry. You can get a lot of lint off them that way and it will save your washer. Good luck and remember the closer you clip the nicer the ragging will look. I usually clip closer than 1/4 inch.
    Lorraine

  4. #4
    Super Member orangeroom's Avatar
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    I've always washed and dried them at home. Just make sure to set a timer and every 5 minutes, clean out your dryer's lint trap! They shed like crazy!!! If you would kindly post a picture when done, we'd love to see it!
    Go forth and sew!

  5. #5
    Super Member orangeroom's Avatar
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    Forgot to mention that when I do make my rag quilts, I tend to sew the whole thing first, then have it set up on an ironing board close to the bathroom. I make a deal with myself that every time I pass it I must snip at least 2 sides of one block. I usually get to snipping and lose track of time. I end up snipping a lot more than 2 sides!!! There are rag quilt scissors at JoAnn's. They make it so much easier to do all that snipping!!! With a coupon, they're not that expensive! I also snip closer than 1/4"!
    Go forth and sew!

  6. #6
    JT
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    Just be sure if you are doing a denim rag quilt, that you use a commercial washer and dryer. Ask me how I know....$100 for washer repair.
    JT

  7. #7
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I have only made lap-size rag quilts, and I did them in my home washer/dryer, but there is a lot of lint and I know many people will advise you to use a commercial facility. I always make mine from 2-3 layers of flannel and never use a smaller filler. I cut all layers the same and rag them all, and I make the squares small enough that no additional quilting is required (especially since there is no filler that could shift around). I highly recommend the spring loaded scissors. They will save your hands. Be sure to post a picture of your quilt!

  8. #8
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JT View Post
    Just be sure if you are doing a denim rag quilt, that you use a commercial washer and dryer. Ask me how I know....$100 for washer repair.
    The last time I used a commercial washer and dryer it cost about $100! No more dollar a load from when I remembered them. LOL
    Got fabric?

  9. #9
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    It depends on your home. I live in a very old home with very old sewer pipes, after a $100 dollar plumber bill I don't wash rag quilts in my washer anymore.
    Sadiemae

  10. #10
    mem
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    Funny...had this discussion last week with a woman at quilt guild who'd just finished a flannel rag quilt and another who had owned commercial laundromats. The one with the laundromat background said never to wash them (the first time) in a home machine because of the amount of linty stuff that will go into the drain...apparently can clog it up bigtime. She said many laundromats with attendants will not allow you to use their machines with new rag quilts because of the drain clogging issue...she'd had experience with that at some of her locations and had had to install new/larger drains. She did tell us which local laundromat allows washing new rag quilts. I would have expected a lot of lint in the dryer, but I never would have realized that the washing part was such an issue; if you've done it successfully at home then I guess you've got a larger than usual drain or you were just lucky .

  11. #11
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    I just take mine to the local laundromat, wet the quilt, then put it in a dryer without any heat and let it tumble away, removing the lint frequently. When there isn't much lint left I dry it ... or you can wash it then dry it ... at the laundromat the first time please.

    ali
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  12. #12
    Super Member grammy Dwynn's Avatar
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    I have done mine in my home machine . . . but before I washed, I used my chenille brush and brushed and brushed. Then into the washer . . another but . . I stopped the washer , about 1/2 way through agitation, and pulled out as much lint ~ floating and in the lint trap. Then when done washing took the rag quilt outside and shake the daylights out of it. Finally into the dryer, ran it for 20 minutes . . . cleaned out lint trap.... finished drying and clean out lint trap again. I have done two twin size rag quilt, 6 raggy flannel jackets and one raggy denim jacket, with no problems . . . knock on wood . . .
    "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." -Confucius

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    I always wash/dry a raggy quilt for the first time at a laundromat because we live in the country and have a septic tank. I had never thought about running a drying cycle first...will do that the next time. Thanks for that suggestion.

  14. #14
    Super Member lalaland's Avatar
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    I don't wash them when I'm done, I put them through a rinse only. Then I dry them. I set an alarm for 10 minutes and I clean the lint trap out every 10 minutes until it's not piling up with lint. Then I leave the blanket in until it's dry.
    Thought for EVERY Day: You know all those things you've always wanted to do? You should go do them.

  15. #15
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    I've only made lil ones- baby & lap ones but i saw a post about sewing them in a pillow case.. BOY does that ever work.. After the wash cycle is over I take it out side-unsew and DUMP the lint .. then dry in dryer, stopping every 10 min or so and remove the lint and 'fluff' the quilt.. Works great..

  16. #16
    Senior Member Dyan's Avatar
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    I wash mine at home, but I have a laundry tub next to my washer, I take the washer drain hose and put it in the sink to drain, I put a nylon stocking over the end of the hose to collect the lint. On a new full sized quilt, I usually get about 2 cups full of lint, and that is when it is wet...
    Dyan

  17. #17
    Senior Member coldquilter's Avatar
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    I would never do it at home as I have had a friend who had a major problem with her washing machine at home after doing so. I just figure it isn't that hard to take it into town and wash at the laundromat. I hate to have my machine out of order from that.
    Michelle

  18. #18
    Super Member lynnsim's Avatar
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    I've made lots and lots of rag quilts and always wash them in my own machines. However, I do shake them outside before washing. Also, if I'm using flannel on the inside, I do same size squares; with batting, it's 1 inch smaller.

  19. #19
    Senior Member SUZAG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by romanojg View Post
    I've always done them in my washer at home without any problems. You can also do them with fleece. You don't get the fraying but it curls at the ends; still a cute look. You can make the blocks the size you want; I think mine were a little smaller but the filler is about an inch smaller. You sew an X thru them before sewing them together. I keep a tote of different ones sewen together for when I need a quick gift. I've also had print on one side and solids on the other and then appliqued designs on the solid side. Do a search here and you'll get tons of tips on this. Good luck on it.
    Glad to hear about the fleece! I've wanted to do a rag but after seeing how many strings I get from pre-washing flannel, it was discouraging. I've always worried about a baby rag quilt with the baby getting strings wrapped around his fingers or toes...Fleece rag quilt...added to my "to-do's"

  20. #20
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    Smile Rag Quilts

    Quote Originally Posted by luvTooQuilt View Post
    I've only made lil ones- baby & lap ones but i saw a post about sewing them in a pillow case.. BOY does that ever work.. After the wash cycle is over I take it out side-unsew and DUMP the lint .. then dry in dryer, stopping every 10 min or so and remove the lint and 'fluff' the quilt.. Works great..
    Can you please explain what you mean by " sewing them in a pillow case"? I'm guessing you mak the quilt, then put it into a pillow case that is either sewn or you could tie it tightly, then wash it.
    I have neve made one but would like to know the best way to eliminate the lint problem. This discussion has given me great information.
    Thanks for all the info.
    Why sleep when you can quilt.
    Luckydenny

  21. #21
    Super Member wendiq's Avatar
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    My thanks to all of you for your input. I am leaning towards a commercial laundry since our pipes are small and I'm afraid might plug up. A lot of good info here. Years ago, I made one using homespuns and flannel....It shed A LOT so I've never wanted to make one again......This one is going to be a twin size so I'm thinking use the commercial to wash and maybe dry at home......

  22. #22
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    I hang a lint sock on the hose coming from the washer into the sink and it catches a ton of stuff. So, no drain clogging worries. I've always done my rag quilts at home--too lazy to go out! and, I've done a full-size that way without any problem. I do check my dryer partway through the drying cycle too.

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