Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Removing Front Cover from a Brother Sewing Machine

  1. #1
    Senior Member Pudge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southington, CT
    Posts
    767

    Removing Front Cover from a Brother Sewing Machine

    I have a Brother model NX450 computerized machine. I've tried to remove the front cover but I stopped when I got resistance. The reason I want to take off the front cover is because sometimes thread will get caught in the thread pathway. I'm referring to the path way that goes from the thread spool and then up and over until the thread is picked up by the thread take up lever and then it comes down to the needle. I've removed several small pieces of thread from the pathway by using a pair of tweezers. But I'd really like to be able to remove the front cover - without totally messing up the machine in some way - because it is really difficult to get in there with the cover on.

    Has anyone here figured out how to remove the front cover from these "modern" computerized machines without breaking the cover?

  2. #2
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    6,104
    Maybe try through brother Facebook group. I have never done it but I am sure many on there have
    Brother (XL-3500i, CV3550, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D), Juki MO-2000QVP, Handiquilter Avante

  3. #3
    Super Member quiltedsunshine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,332
    They're really not made for the consumer to open. They have hidden screws deep inside the machine. If you don't know what you're doing, you can sever the cables that connect to the circuit board. I would recommend taking it to a Brother dealer.
    Annette in Utah

  4. #4
    Senior Member sandrab64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Wanamingo, MN
    Posts
    464
    I use a pipe cleaner to get stuff out of that area.
    Sandra B

  5. #5
    Senior Member LilaKay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mission, TX
    Posts
    381
    I use unwaxed dental floss to run through this area. You can pull it back and forth until the area is clean..
    LilaKay...greatgramma to Brielle Mae

  6. #6
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    western NY formerly MN, FL, NC, SC
    Posts
    49,088
    Blog Entries
    53
    my first thought is that you may void your machine's warranty
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak T.H.I.N.K.
    T is it True? H is it Helpful? I is it Inspiring? N is it Necessary? K is it Kind?

    Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we might as well dance.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    34,734
    I don't have computerized machine. Don't think I would take the cover off.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,281
    I am having the same problem with my Juki. Will try pipe cleaner and dental floss. Good ideas.
    granna of 5

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    619
    You can buy the proper screwdrivers. Just go slowly and carefully. My options have been to hand my precious machines off to someone I will never meet or know the name of (they're just"sent out") or to someone that's pompous and not overbright. I downloaded the repair manual and got the tools I needed. At least I care about the outcome and not a bit about making myself look important.

    charlotte

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Hampstead N.C.
    Posts
    1,802
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltnNan View Post
    my first thought is that you may void your machine's warranty
    That was my first thought as well. Be careful!
    Create something beautiful from scraps.

  11. #11
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    6,228
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltnNan View Post
    my first thought is that you may void your machine's warranty
    I'm sure it will void the warranty. I have an OSMG who works on some computerized models especially Berninas. He used to be a Bernina dealer before he retired. Does an awesome job.
    Patrice S

    Bernina Artista 180, Singer 301a, Featherweight Centennial, Rocketeer, Juki 2200 QVP Mini, White 1964 Featherweight

  12. #12
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    11,216
    The best money I have spent on my Bernina was to pay a tech (cash) to come to my house and show me how to take off the housing, clean and oil, what to avoid, and what to watch out for. My very old Bernina 1260 is still sewing like new and has never been in the shop for repair. I deep clean and oil it regularly. It would cost me about $120 per cleaning at the shop now. The light switch won't work but I never turned it off when I'm sewing anyway. I don't think I'd do it for the new high end machines but for the mid level I would pay a tech to give me a lesson. After the warranty is over, who cares.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Anthony, TX
    Posts
    229
    Blog Entries
    5
    If you are looking for a repairman - New England Sewing in Manchester, CT works on all brands of sewing machines, both new and vintage. John may even tell you how to get the cover off if you give him a call. Best of luck

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    771
    I would do it if it's out of warranty. Go slow, take photo's of every step, there will be hidden screws that will allow you to dig deeper into the machine. Take photos so you'll know how to put it back together. I recently did this with a Janome serger. It turned out to be quite easy. Not all screws needed a screw driver, some needed allen wrenches. I found a lot dust and dirt, thread and was amazed at how easy it was to put back together.

  15. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,340
    I have that machine, and my guess is, that since you can't even oil it yourself, you're not supposed to try taking the cover off, either. It annoys me that this machine is designed to be serviced, oiled, cleaned only by a serviceman.

  16. #16
    Super Member donna13350's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    1,015
    You can take the front cover off, but you have to be careful. Basically, the machine front and back covers both come apart at the same time, splitting the machine in half. You have to be very careful, because there are tiny little plugs that can come unplugged if you separate the two halves too much. Also..if you decide to do this..it is important that when you put it back together, the presser foot has to be in the down position..if it is not, then your feed dogs won't work when you go to sew.As others have said, if it's under warranty, I'd go that route..if it's out of warranty, and you are secure in your ability to take it apart and reassemble it, then you really can't hurt it as long as you're careful.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.