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restoring treadle machines and the bases

restoring treadle machines and the bases

Old 06-24-2011, 08:58 AM
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I have purchased a couple of treadle machines, a Red Eye and a #127, with Sphinx design. I have read Billies tutorials on how to clean the machine heads, but my question is concerning the cast iron frames. If there is a little rust how do I remove that? I mentioned to my husband, that I was thinking of taking the one stand somewhere to have it sandblasted. Then questions came up on painting the stand gloss or matt,and was I going to paint it or take it somewhere to have it professionally spray painted. I don't want to make this a major project. I thought it would be fun to do on my own (other then the sandblasting). He means well, but has a little (?) OCD and this is taking the J out of Joy for me. I am not planning on having the cabinets restored. They are fine the way they are. Can someone please address what you do when restoring the stands? I haven't read all 1200 and some posts on the Vintage Section, so would appreciate any help. Thanks, going to take my anxiety pill as we speak. Blessings, Nancy :-(
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Old 06-24-2011, 09:14 AM
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I'm interested too. I've seen them painted shiny, but not matte.
It might be a southern thing??
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Old 06-24-2011, 09:57 AM
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Try www.treadleon.net they have several sections on restoring cabinets, machines, etc.
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Old 06-24-2011, 10:18 AM
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Its easy to take it apart. Take it out-doors and use a wire brush thingy on a drill and smooth it put then on a hot windless day, spray it with Rustoleum color of your choice. I discovered mine was originally silver but I am doing it in black matte finish. Its easy, go for it!
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Old 06-24-2011, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by iluvmycats
I have purchased a couple of treadle machines, a Red Eye and a #127, with Sphinx design. I have read Billies tutorials on how to clean the machine heads, but my question is concerning the cast iron frames. If there is a little rust how do I remove that? I mentioned to my husband, that I was thinking of taking the one stand somewhere to have it sandblasted. Then questions came up on painting the stand gloss or matt,and was I going to paint it or take it somewhere to have it professionally spray painted. I don't want to make this a major project. I thought it would be fun to do on my own (other then the sandblasting). He means well, but has a little (?) OCD and this is taking the J out of Joy for me. I am not planning on having the cabinets restored. They are fine the way they are. Can someone please address what you do when restoring the stands? I haven't read all 1200 and some posts on the Vintage Section, so would appreciate any help. Thanks, going to take my anxiety pill as we speak. Blessings, Nancy :-(
Karosene and steel wool will remove light rust for heavy rust us wet or dry sandpaper lubicated with karosene. Clean the irons well then wipe down with denatured alcohol from the hardware store. Apply two coats of flat black (rustoleum or your favorite brand). When dry you can wipe the irons down with liquid gold. this will help the new paint blend with the old. The Singer logo on the cross member of the iron should be paint gold and the same on the side logos. Do this with a small art brush. Thats it and they will look new. Glenn
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Old 06-24-2011, 11:41 AM
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Sand blasting would be the easiest, especially if you are going to repaint it your self.

Powder coating is another option to painting, it will last forever and won't chip either as it is baked on :D:D:D
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Old 06-24-2011, 11:57 AM
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DH sandblasted mine and repainted it with gloss black. It looks absolutely wonderfule. Mine was my g'grandmothers that my grandmother had painted. I had the case restored by a friend who is a master woodworker and it is stunning. Now just trying to get a machine for it as no one in my family has a clue what happened to the one that was in it. I have a 66 that I'm not sure yet will fit. That's my next project in the next couple of weeks.
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Old 06-24-2011, 07:52 PM
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i have four bases (one cabinet) and they all are shiny black, all original. it feels like enamel over iron. i know it's not enamel, but that's what it feels like. definitely not matte.
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Old 06-24-2011, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by butterflywing
i have four bases (one cabinet) and they all are shiny black, all original. it feels like enamel over iron. i know it's not enamel, but that's what it feels like. definitely not matte.
I think most of these items were "Japaned". I found this on Wikipedia:

Just as China is a common name for Chinese ceramic, Japan is an old name for Japanese Lacquerware[8] (made from the sap of the Lacquer Tree) and its European imitations. As Asian and Indian lacquer work became popular in England, France, the Netherlands, and Spain in the 17th century the Europeans developed imitations that were effectively a different technique of lacquering. The European technique, which is used on furniture and other objects, uses varnishes that have a resin base similar to shellac. The technique, which became known as japanning, involves applying several coats of varnish which are each heat-dried and polished. In the 18th Century this type of lacquering gained a large popular following.
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Old 06-22-2012, 08:31 AM
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Resin base similar to shellac... I know that mineral spirits and 0000 steel wool redistributed the finish on my National treadle's wood without removing it. Perhaps this is possible with japanning? Which dissolves shellac? I know that my Goop cleaning left more than one machine with tan japanning that deserves to be "redistributed".
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