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Thread: Sandwiching issues.....help?

  1. #26
    Senior Member Delilah's Avatar
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    I have only been quilting 5 years but have churned out 112 quilts & #113 is almost done and they are all nice sized quilts, only 2 wall hangings. I only pinned the first 3 or 4 quilts and have been spraying since then. I do not bother to pin once it's sprayed. Any of the brands are satisfactory, some are stickier than others (like Sullivan's in the pink can), June Taylor's is just as good as any. Use sparingly until you learn it's properties. The fumes can be daunting but good ventilation helps a lot, however, do not put a fan on your work. I have a king size bed that I cover with a big flannel sheet and do the layering on that. I have bad knees and do not crawl around on the floor. The flannel sheet holds my work firmly and helps protect the work area. Lay batting down, position backing, peel backing back half way, spray batting, and smooth backing down, peel back other half and repeat. Flip over, position top, and repeat process. Anyone need a big box of pins?

  2. #27
    Senior Member joann hussey's Avatar
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    I lay my backing on a flat surface, floor or table, than use masking tape in the 4 corners & also the sides to keep it secure, than batting on top, than your quilt top, use safety pins to hold everything tog. pick up & quilt. I have good luck doing it this way

  3. #28
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coloradoquilter
    http://www.sharonschambernetwork.com...ing/index.html

    I couple of years ago I watched a video of this method and tried it on a baby quilt. I'm still an under experienced machine quilter, but have decided I can't improve unless I just finish my projects the best I can at the point I'm at. Have fun.
    Did you machine or hand quilt? I always heard that you shouldn't thread baste to machine quilt.

  4. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmom04
    Quote Originally Posted by Coloradoquilter
    http://www.sharonschambernetwork.com...ing/index.html

    I couple of years ago I watched a video of this method and tried it on a baby quilt. I'm still an under experienced machine quilter, but have decided I can't improve unless I just finish my projects the best I can at the point I'm at. Have fun.
    Did you machine or hand quilt? I always heard that you shouldn't thread baste to machine quilt.
    I machine quilted, she suggests you remove the threads in the area where you'll be quilting so you don't sew over the basting threads. The width of the herringbone stitch really does a nice job of pulling the layers together and comes out easy a section at a time. You get the horizontal and diagonal basting stitches at the same time. It's also faster than conventional basting. I plan on trying it again with a bigger project. The only issue I had was I skimped some on the backing and by the time I was at the top I was really close on it. The first thing she says is NOT to do that.

  5. #30
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I love basting spray. It seems to hold the quilt together better for me.

  6. #31
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    Another method of stretching the backing is to put two "church" tables together to form a large square. Then put your backing fabric down and stretch it, using large "bull dog clips", (bought at the office supply store) to secure the backing every 12 inches or so. When the backing is taut and even, lay the batting down on it and smooth it out. Then lay the quilt on and smooth it out and stretch it taut if it is large enough to reach the edge of the tables. Pin every 4 to 5 inches. If you wish, use the basting spray to hold batting and top in place.

  7. #32
    Senior Member Sparky's Avatar
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    I'm wondering about why "your stitches are too close together". It sounds like you are having trouble with the quilt not dragging on your machine. You may need to hold it up and make sure you have enough space for it to "float". I would agree to use spray for an easy basting. But I find it is very important to have the backing taped to the floor first so that it is slightly stretched to it's max. Good luck.

  8. #33
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Don't use the basting spray if you have a pet bird - It could kill it I do and I don't use anything smelly. I have a glass topped dining room - not near big enough, but it works. I use plastic clamps - from home depot- I clamp the backing onto the table - four each side - three on each end. I lay out my backing - clamp it - lay on batting - clamp it - lay out quilt top - clamp it - using the same clamps. I pin at least every 3-4 inches. I usually make big quilts and have to move after pinning until all is pinned. Be sure to smooth out everything in the same order as before and use the clamps - as before. When ready to quilt, make sure to roll up and stick in opening of machine always start in the middle. I quilt side to side across center then top to bottom down center. I always quilt next to quilting. Always works for me. You have to keep pulling quilt to make sure it doesn't get hung up on pins,edge of table, or any place else.

  9. #34
    Super Member mimisharon's Avatar
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    Be sure you've ironed your backing fabric.

    Be sure to hang your batting over a table or rod to flatten out the wrinkles from packaging or run through the dryer for 5 minutes on low heat to get the wrinkles out (LEAST favorable method)

    Clip or tape each side across the middle FIRST as others suggested. Also begin your quilting from the middle to outside to keep the puckers out.

    Relax and don't be so critical of your own work. The loft of each batting is different. If you choose a high loft or a poly batting you can get more puckers if you are trying to quilt to close. Read the batting package for the best width of quilting.

    These are my best sandwiching tips that I've learned the hard way by not doing any of the above the first time. Since then I've developed a tendency to do it with every quilt to keep from ripping and screaming so much. :oops:

    Hugs,
    Sharon

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