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Thread: Sandwiching issues.....help?

  1. #1
    MarthaVA's Avatar
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    Hi. I'm new to quilting. I am making a quilt for my daughter, and I have hand quilted the 3 sections - 3 times. I've had to tear out the stitches - 3 times. :evil:

    The first time I tried machine quilting but the stitches kept coming out way too close together - after 2 rows I decided it wasn't good so I would hand quilt it.

    I am sewing my rows about 4 inches apart, on the diagonal. I don't know if this makes any difference.

    The next time I sewed (by hand) I finished all of the stitching and laid the quilt out flat. I realized that the fabric was not laying flat on the backing. :(

    I tore it all out, started again.

    I sewed about 5 or 6 rows, and checked the back. Same thing.

    I know it must have to do with the way I'm sandwiching. The first time and second time, I had pinned it all together after laying it on the floor. That was really hard for me - being on the floor and trying to get it all done. Hard on the knees and the back.
    I also had not used a hoop the second time.

    The third time, I didn't pin it but hand basted it lengthwise and widthwise. I don't think I used enuf basting.

    I also used a hoop the third time. That didn't help.

    My next step is to lay out the backing, tape it down, spray it w/adhesive, then lay down the batting, spray with adhesive, then the top. My only problem is, I'm afraid to take this next step because if I get it wrong again, I'm afraid I'll ruin the quilt with the spray adhesive.

    HELP????

    Thanks.
    Martha

  2. #2
    Super Member PurplePassion's Avatar
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    Use the spray adhesive, it really helps. and I pin it together also., just to be safe. Are you using a walking foot on your machine when you quilt?
    Elaine

  3. #3
    MarthaVA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurplePassion
    Use the spray adhesive, it really helps. and I pin it together also., just to be safe. Are you using a walking foot on your machine when you quilt?
    Elaine
    Yes, I got a walking foot and tried it. When I try it on a small (4x4) square, the stitches come out perfect. When I put the larger quilt in it made the stitches really tiny (same setting as the 4x4) and it was pushing my fabric.

    I'm going to take my machine and everything and go to the lqs that has offered to help me. But I just didn't have time during the holiday....I was trying to get this done by Christmas....but that didn't work. :(

  4. #4
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
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    you could baste or pin,that will hold your backing in place.

  5. #5
    MarthaVA's Avatar
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    I tried the pinning and the basting......but musta done something wrong. Thanks.

  6. #6
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    I use the spray basting on all of my quilts.
    I have not had a problem with the fabrics shifting. I am luck that DH has keys to the church which is only a block away and we go there and push tables together so that there is no crawling on the floor on knees.

  7. #7
    Super Member Lneal's Avatar
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    The spray adhesive allows you to pick up your material and readjust without applying more spray. Always spray the batting not the fabric. That is what my lqs told me to do. This is how I do it; Lay down my batting on my table, adjust my backing to fit the batting. I fold backing material half way back to spray the batting, smooth out backing and do the other half. If I need to adjust I pick up fabric and smooth with my hand. Then I turn it over, with batting on top I lay down my quilt top and do the same. Then I pin randomly. It always works for me.

  8. #8
    MarthaVA's Avatar
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    Ineal - thats a GREAT idea. Thank you.

    You guys are giving me great confidence in going forward with this.

    I'm going upstairs to spread out the batting now! I'll get DH to help me make sure everything comes out straight. Then I'll pin to be 100% sure.

    K, off I go! Thanks again. :thumbup: :D

  9. #9
    Super Member Darlene's Avatar
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    I don't know if this helps but always start basting or pinning in the middle of the quilt. FYI

  10. #10
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    with all that handling it can be stretched out of whack too. lay out the fabric and press it again if necessary. press, not iron. then check to see if square. either by folding the top in half or by using a large ruler in the corners.
    if all is well, start over. goodness, you have had a time. take a deep breath and follow everyones suggestions and good luck.

  11. #11
    Super Member cabbagepatchkid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lneal
    The spray adhesive allows you to pick up your material and readjust without applying more spray. Always spray the batting not the fabric. That is what my lqs told me to do. This is how I do it; Lay down my batting on my table, adjust my backing to fit the batting. I fold backing material half way back to spray the batting, smooth out backing and do the other half. If I need to adjust I pick up fabric and smooth with my hand. Then I turn it over, with batting on top I lay down my quilt top and do the same. Then I pin randomly. It always works for me.
    I really like your method and I'm going to try it next time.

    Before I start to baste all 3 layers together I tape the backing to the table so that it stays in place while I put the other 2 layers on top and then either use pins to baste it or baste it with thread.

  12. #12
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    The first one I pinned...I did not use nearly enough pins. I had a mess of puckers starting... I put a pin every 4 inches or so now and no more puckering. :D:D:D

  13. #13
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    When I get ready to do my sandwich, I use the big tables at church. I tape down the back, using masking tape at about every 7 inches. I adjust it to make sure it is totally flat. If I mess this up my quilt will be the same. I have tried doing this at home but it does not come out as well. Once I had to take all the pins out and start over because I was not happy with the result.

    I do hope this helps you. I know how it feels to rip out more than once.

  14. #14
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I take my quilt tops, batting and backing to my mom. She is a long arm quilter. She puts them on the machine and bastes them for me. She sets her stitch length as long as she can get it and uses her odds and ends of thread. Then I can hand quilt them on my Q-snap floor frame and remove the basting stitches when I am done. It saves all that crawling around the floor.

  15. #15
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    If you don't have a big table and must crawl on the floor, get knee pads. Some husbands have them. They think they are for laying floor tile. If you can't swipe them off your husband, go to the sports store and buy cheap volleyball knee pads. Best money ever spent for sandwhiching on the floor.

  16. #16
    Super Member lisalovesquilting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lneal
    The spray adhesive allows you to pick up your material and readjust without applying more spray. Always spray the batting not the fabric. That is what my lqs told me to do. This is how I do it; Lay down my batting on my table, adjust my backing to fit the batting. I fold backing material half way back to spray the batting, smooth out backing and do the other half. If I need to adjust I pick up fabric and smooth with my hand. Then I turn it over, with batting on top I lay down my quilt top and do the same. Then I pin randomly. It always works for me.
    Which brands are the best. Also I tried it once and the fumes were really bad. :(

  17. #17
    Junior Member sheliab12's Avatar
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    I have never heard of doing it this way . I like it because then you can see if there are any puckers in the back first. Is this better then taping the backing down and do the way everyone else does. This the way I do it and most time after releasing the tape I find puckers in the backing. I am going to try this.

  18. #18
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    When I make the sandwich, I using masking tape or painters tape to tape the backing to the floor. I use the rubber kneeling pad or sit on the floor when I can. Then lay the batting over the backing and smooth it out with you hands. Finally, lots of safety pins - every couple inches to hold the sandwich together. I machine quilt and my backings come out perfect. Start from the center & work out.

  19. #19
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    I use the gardner's kneeling pads. You can get them in the $ store, drug store, etc. They have lots of uses besides making the quilt sandwich.

  20. #20
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarthaVA
    Hi. I'm new to quilting. I am making a quilt for my daughter, and I have hand quilted the 3 sections - 3 times. I've had to tear out the stitches - 3 times. :evil:

    The first time I tried machine quilting but the stitches kept coming out way too close together - after 2 rows I decided it wasn't good so I would hand quilt it.

    I am sewing my rows about 4 inches apart, on the diagonal. I don't know if this makes any difference.

    The next time I sewed (by hand) I finished all of the stitching and laid the quilt out flat. I realized that the fabric was not laying flat on the backing. :(

    I tore it all out, started again.

    I sewed about 5 or 6 rows, and checked the back. Same thing.

    I know it must have to do with the way I'm sandwiching. The first time and second time, I had pinned it all together after laying it on the floor. That was really hard for me - being on the floor and trying to get it all done. Hard on the knees and the back.
    I also had not used a hoop the second time.

    The third time, I didn't pin it but hand basted it lengthwise and widthwise. I don't think I used enuf basting.

    I also used a hoop the third time. That didn't help.

    My next step is to lay out the backing, tape it down, spray it w/adhesive, then lay down the batting, spray with adhesive, then the top. My only problem is, I'm afraid to take this next step because if I get it wrong again, I'm afraid I'll ruin the quilt with the spray adhesive.

    HELP????

    Thanks.
    Martha
    Be sure you are able to secure the back to something before you start to spray baste or pin. I use the blue painters tape, and tape it to a table so the back is secure and wrinkle-free, but not stretched out of shape. If you don't have a large enugh table, baste and pin in sections, starting with the center and working out. Then when you layer the batting and top, the back won't move around. I think that is what may be contributing to your problem. I always spray baste - it helps with my pinning, which in turn makes the quilting better.

  21. #21
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    I cannot get on the floor my knees are bad.
    I have a cutting table that is only 36 inchs wide but if I attach the quilt down the middle first and pin then I can move it to each side and reattach and pin. This has worked well for me. I use those white plastic clips made for holding quilts on tables with less than an inch depth. But the big black clips for paper work also but are bulkey to use.

  22. #22

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    http://www.sharonschambernetwork.com...ing/index.html

    I couple of years ago I watched a video of this method and tried it on a baby quilt. I'm still an under experienced machine quilter, but have decided I can't improve unless I just finish my projects the best I can at the point I'm at. Have fun.

  23. #23
    Barb_Frost's Avatar
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    My suggestion is to have it done by someone with a long arm machine.. They can square it up for you and all you need to do is put the binding on.. Than start a new project.. Take a quilting class for beginners and you will be surprised at the great feeling and new tricks you will learn.. I don't hand stitch or tie my quilts that someone is going to machine wash.. and use...

  24. #24
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    WOW!! What a great idea. I have never thought of doing it this way before. I can't wait to try it. I, too, am apt to have ripples in my backing. Perhaps this will prevent it.

  25. #25
    Super Member KarenBarnes's Avatar
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    Sometimes my space is limited to lay out the quilt for sandwiching so I hang the layers (with pushpins) from my storage cabinets which line a wall. I then use the plastic basting pins. I love them! It makes it so much easier to hand quilt that I don't even have to use a hoop! Good luck!

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