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Thread: School Glue Problem - A Cautionary Tale!

  1. #1
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    Red face School Glue Problem - A Cautionary Tale!

    I've used School Glue successfully several times on bindings and for basting. BUT I created a problem for myself the other day when I was basting a sandwich for a small project using Kona solid fabric backing and a thin polyester batting. I drizzled a bit of glue onto the batting and spread it with my finger and then placed the solid backing on top and pressed it down with my hands. Then I decided to hurry the process along by pressing the sandwich to dry the glue. BIG MISTAKE!

    Apparently the glue hadn't soaked into the batting sufficiently and the result was a series of dark "glob" marks on the solid fabric. I tried spraying the sandwich with water to dissolve the glue but to no avail. I then pulled the sandwich apart and tried unsuccessfully to rub out the marks. I finally had to create a pattern on the solid fabric using fabric crayons so the marks wouldn't show! The improvisation worked out just fine and the project was saved but it was "white knuckle time" for awhile.

    So....I think that my mistake was twofold: first assuming I'd spread the glue thin enough to begin with, and then the ironing -- I suspect that the glue actually got scorched when it penetrated the Kona and was ironed.

    Lessons learned: 1. be VERY careful using glue on polyester batting by making sure it is spread VERY thin 2. don't press the sandwich while the glue is wet.

  2. #2
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Great advice, thank you!!!!!

  3. #3
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
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    Did you wash it after you finished it? It is my understanding that the glue washes out and you shouldn't have it showing on the backing.

  4. #4
    Super Member gramajo's Avatar
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    I've had glue marks showing on the back when I've pressed to dry the glue. I always wash my projects when finished and have never had the glue marks show through.

  5. #5
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Sorry...double post.

  6. #6
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I think another QB member warned us about using Elmer's glue with polyester batting.
    If I recall she said not to iron the glue to the batting...just let it dry.

  7. #7
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    and don't you do dots, not lots to spread? I only tried it for binding and evidently used too much. it ironed through my binding. I was not happy and I did dots.
    "From hence only infer that an Englishman, of all men, ought not to despise foreigners as such and I think the inference is just, since what they are today, we were yesterday, and tomorrow they will be like us"
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  8. #8
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    I have only used it for the binding, I iron it to hold it in place till I sew it. so far I have not had any issues and have been doing that for several years. I still use 505 spray for my basting. I wait till its half price and free shipping at Joanns. I still love 505 spray.

  9. #9
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    The brown scorched areas of glue will wash out....been there, done that

  10. #10
    Senior Member amelia0607's Avatar
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    I only use glue sticks and let it dry overnight before doing anything else. Quilting is teaching this very impatient person to be a little patient!!

  11. #11
    Super Member DebbE's Avatar
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    I pour the glue into a small dish and add water to thin it out a bit, and use a 1 inch cheap paint brush to lightly spread on. I don't dry it by using an iron, I leave it overnight to dry and then quilt away. There is always something else to do while waiting for a quilt to dry, so it doesn't bother me.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    I used the glue with success many times and since I am an impatient person I ironed it every sinle time. Never a problem with cotton batting and glue. It always washed our just fine. The only time I had a problem was when I used poly batting. The glue looked like it was working at first, but the whole thing came apart when I started quilting it. The glue just did not adhere properly to the poly batting.

  13. #13
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    I use glue sticks and they only need just a quick pressing. Haven't used them on a big quilt yet. Hopefully tomorrow.

  14. #14
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
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    I must be the only person who dislikes school glue for basting the quilt sandwich. I'll stick with spray adhesive. My time is worth more to me than the little bit of money I would save using school glue and waiting for the glue to dry.

  15. #15
    Senior Member ladydukes's Avatar
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    When I discovered how well Elmers Glue worked, I got carried away - if a little is good, a lot would be better! WRONG! I am making my daughter a QAYG Cheryl Phillips DWR quilt for a wedding gift, so I used the glue to adhere the center squares to the batting. Instructions state to turn under and glue the edges of the square. I put too much glue, so when I needed to adjust some of them, I had to literally pull it apart and trim the fabric and batting. The glue had hardened, so I knew I didn't want to sew over it. Lessons Learned: 1) don't get carried away with glue, and 2) place the square a little bit inside the drawn line. (I'm sure this is as clear as mud if you haven't used this pattern).

  16. #16
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    I am just experiencing something like this now. I am using a cotton/poly blend batting, I found when I applied the glue it would bead, I ignored it and pressed forward, I did iron to dry the glue, and now that I am SITD, it is losing it’s adhesiveness, then complicated with I am learning to use my new Singer 15-91, with monofilament thread, just an over all new experience, so needless to say-- UGH! The learning curve here has been big.
    just sayin’ in mho I am not that impressed with the premium cotton/poly batting that I had heard so many prefer.
    Sorry kind of got off topic, but as a whole I am preferring the glue baste method vs. pinning. Will stick to W/N.

  17. #17
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    Sorry you ran into this problem - it's so disappointing after the work you put in. Neither the poly batting nor the glue can take too much heat. Perhaps the dark spot is scorching? Maybe some white vinegar will help take it out.
    “You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.” ~Maya Angelou.
    One's mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions. ~Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

  18. #18
    Super Member sniktasemaj's Avatar
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    I never press polyester batting period. Once I did and it made a flat hard batting. The polyester melts if it gets too hot.

  19. #19
    Senior Member anothernancy's Avatar
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    Thank you all for sharing! I am getting ready to put together queen almost king (got a liitle carried away lol]. I am debating spray or glue. Your experience helps!

  20. #20
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    I've had a few problems with the glue basting. The last time I put just a few pins here and there to take the pressure off the glued spots. The pins were easy to remove when I got near them, and it helped. Seems some batts don't take to the glue as well.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  21. #21
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    Thank you for the great advice.

  22. #22
    Member crzypatcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teri D View Post
    I've used School Glue successfully several times on bindings and for basting. BUT I created a problem for myself the other day when I was basting a sandwich for a small project using Kona solid fabric backing and a thin polyester batting. I drizzled a bit of glue onto the batting and spread it with my finger and then placed the solid backing on top and pressed it down with my hands. Then I decided to hurry the process along by pressing the sandwich to dry the glue. BIG MISTAKE!

    Apparently the glue hadn't soaked into the batting sufficiently and the result was a series of dark "glob" marks on the solid fabric. I tried spraying the sandwich with water to dissolve the glue but to no avail. I then pulled the sandwich apart and tried unsuccessfully to rub out the marks. I finally had to create a pattern on the solid fabric using fabric crayons so the marks wouldn't show! The improvisation worked out just fine and the project was saved but it was "white knuckle time" for awhile.

    So....I think that my mistake was twofold: first assuming I'd spread the glue thin enough to begin with, and then the ironing -- I suspect that the glue actually got scorched when it penetrated the Kona and was ironed.

    Lessons learned: 1. be VERY careful using glue on polyester batting by making sure it is spread VERY thin 2. don't press the sandwich while the glue is wet.
    I just "Elmered" a charity quilt this afternoon using poly batting. I let the back dry by itself for a hour, flipped it over and glued the top, and let it sit for another hour. It is holding beautifully! Haven't started the quilting process yet, but I can't forsee any problems. I spread the drizzled glue using a damp foam brush from Home Depot. I was going to press but took the advise of another poster about the poly melting from the heat. Up to this point I have only used the glue on cotton batting, with great sucess!! I will update once I have started quilting and see if it holds thru the whole process.

  23. #23
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    Thanks for the heads up. This is an very informative thread. Thanks for posting.

  24. #24
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    I just used the Elmers school glue stick on my Dresden plate blades and ironed them right away with no show thru or other problems. It was the first time I tried the glue and I really like how easy nit was to use.
    Kathy Osterby

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