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Thread: School glue to repair a teddy bear??

  1. #1
    SAHM's Avatar
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    Sorry if this is kinda OT. I read somewhere around here about using school glue to repair seams, and I was wondering if it might repair ripped seams on a dearly loved teddy. I searched for Elmer's glue, but couldn't find the post I was thinking of. Do you guys think that might work?? He's sort of a quilted bear (purchased at a store), and the seams are ripped. THANKS!

  2. #2
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    I would get some fabric glue for that, it will last longer. I get mine at Hobby Lobby, but you can get it different places!

  3. #3
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    I think I would also try to whip the seams back together, too.

  4. #4
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    I think I would also try to whip the seams back together, too.
    I agree, however, if you are going to use glue, Ninnie's suggestion of the fabric glue (Aleene's) - - check the front of the bottle since she developed many different glues for different uses.
    Under no circumstance would I use Elmer's glue/school glue on a fabric anything, since it is washes out of fabric, hence it's known use as "school glue".

  5. #5
    SAHM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    I think I would also try to whip the seams back together, too.
    I've whipped the seams together before, problem is they used this crappy fabric that's fraying like mad, and it's either hand stitched or machine stitched with a very wide stitch length. My mom bought it at pottery barn years ago, and it starting ripping/fraying almost right away.

    Problem is, it's got such a sweet story to it now, I simply must "operate." This teddy bear doctor is stumped though!!

    :)

    Maybe I can take a picture of the problem.

  6. #6
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    Could you maybe put something like bias tape OVER both edges - almost like a patch or applique - so that it might look like a design feature instead of a repair? That could catch the "good" fabric that is beyond the fray zone.

    (I know what I mean, but I think the above is about as clear as mud)

  7. #7
    SAHM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    Could you maybe put something like bias tape OVER both edges - almost like a patch or applique - so that it might look like a design feature instead of a repair? That could catch the "good" fabric that is beyond the fray zone.

    (I know what I mean, but I think the above is about as clear as mud)
    Bearisgray - thank you. I think I do understand what you mean, and that will work in some spots. Do you think I should glue the seams under the patch anyway, just so it doesn't get worse?? I'll have to raid my stash and see what i can find.

    Trying to attach pictures...

  8. #8
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
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    I would see if I could glue it first and possibly whip stitch the seams if at all possible. It would be so cute if teddy had a "bandage" in the shape of a heart or whatever.... :D

  9. #9
    SAHM's Avatar
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    trying to add pictures.

    ...
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Size:  44.3 KB

  10. #10
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAHM
    trying to add pictures.
    Awww, he's so cute!!

  11. #11
    SAHM's Avatar
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    more...
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  12. #12
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    ahhh, that is so cute!
    I liked bearisgray's idea of adding patches or bias tape ... if the fabric is as bad as you think, you might consider insuring the patch is glued in those frayed spaces and then "applique" along the bias strip or patch.

    My mother bought a quilt from a church group for the kids one year.
    as your bear is suffering, so did this blanket. Taking a hint from "raw-edged" quilting, I have just started taking larger blocks, and putting them over the raggedy patches and stitching them down with a small zigzag stitch. I figure within three or four more years, I will have a new quilt, with the old one quilted inside of it, the places that I sewed the new blocks in will be the quilting to replace the tying that was done in the first place.

    (As an aside - - I built my grandson a patriotic bed quilt back in 1996 from fabric I bought at WalMart. I used Wright's ribbon binding ... blanket binding I guess is the better word/name. As a 2-yr-old child growing up with that quilt on his bed, you can imagine the wear, tear, and washing that quilt has gone through! The blanket binding is absolutely THREADS! But, there isn't one seam or piece of fabric that has given way)

    Do let us know what you finally decide to do with your little teddy.
    Have you considered (this always happens when I spend a lot of time TALKING) ... have you considered sliding some fusible web under the places that are separating and fraying, using tweezers or nail file to smooth it out?
    If you insert the fusible first, with the glue facing outward, place the patch in place, do your appliquing, and then apply the iron to stabilize the whole thing.

  13. #13
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    oh! My answer came after you showed the owies! Bummer!
    I see what you mean. Poor little bear :cry: .
    Those are not cute. But, he is a cheerful little fellow.
    Even a double fusible applique over the spot would do the trick, if you think that the other material could handle being stitched through ... but, that fabric looks like good quality, but I can sure see where they didn't waste any fabric in the seam allowances, did they? Phooot!

  14. #14
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    what it might look like with bias tape over the seams
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  15. #15
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    He is such a cute bear, but what bad ouchies. I think the bias tape idea would work great. It wouldn't hurt to glue the seams too.

  16. #16
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    how about fray check on the seams - then put some sort of patch over the seams ?

  17. #17
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    how about fray check on the seams - then put some sort of patch over the seams ?
    That would definitely protect the seams, but I can't remember ... it dries clear, but is it shiny? although ... just along the seams, it surely wouldn't be that noticeable.

  18. #18
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    The seams on the bear would be covered by the patch - unless you are talking about fray check on the patch?

    Sometimes a toy just has to be fixed because it is so loved - - -

  19. #19
    SAHM's Avatar
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    what is fray check?? could I get that at Joanns??

  20. #20
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    It's a liquid that can be put on the cut ends of ribbons or the edges of seams and it seems to prevent further fraying or unraveling.

    I know that most fabric stores would have it (or something similar) and WalMart also carries it (or at least it did)

  21. #21
    Super Member omak's Avatar
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    I do believe that you can find Fray Check at any place that sells quilting fabric and notions, including JoAnn's. The last time I bought some, it was in a squeeze bottle about three and a half inches high, just a little thing, but it does a lot and goes a looong way.

  22. #22
    Super Member PurplePassion's Avatar
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    I would open up a seam in the back and take out all the stuffing. turn it inside out and resew the seams --reinforcing them with some extra fabric and fray check. Then put it back together. Elaine

  23. #23
    Super Member CajunQuilter2's Avatar
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    try fray check along with fabric glue.

  24. #24
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    I agree with Purple Passion that her way would be one of the best ways of fixing your bear. If you don't want to go to that extreme, try outting a small piece of fabric behind the seam, maybe glueing it even, and sewing the seam edges to the fabric. You could give your bear a nice wide belt on top of the center seam, and sew it with the applique method of not having the stitching show. I think he'd look great with a nice fat belt.

  25. #25
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I was doctor to a real old Teddy. I ended up making pattern pieces of the "injured parts" and sewing them over the bad parts like a second skin. You can probably find matching homespun cotton if that is the path you chose. Old Teddy is happy in a dorm room at UCD; Amazing how much sentiment our Teddies hold.

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