Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30

Thread: Selling a quilt

  1. #1
    Senior Member SWEETPEACHES's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    867
    I've made many quilts. I've given away most. I sent one to my aunt recently and she is insisting on paying me for it. AND she wants to take it to work and show it off. What if someone at her work wants one?

    I have no idea how to go about setting a price. After the cost of fabric and paying the LAQ, how much should I add on top?

    Ideas? (I'm talking basically simple quilts, like log cabin or strip quilts or a friendship block) Nothing intricate like I've see you ladies do.

  2. #2
    Super Member Airwick156's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Grants Pass, Oregon
    Posts
    3,558
    Blog Entries
    6
    Someone will come by and tell you. I am going to watch this topic. Good Luck. I also give all mine away. LOL

  3. #3
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cadillac, MI
    Posts
    6,583
    Blog Entries
    19
    Nothing less than double the price of everything that goes into the quilt and even then you're giving away a lot of hours of work.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ljsunflower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    897
    It depends on whether you need to make some money or you would just like to sell some to get back the money it cost you to make. Also the area where you are could have high unemployment, businesses closing down, people not making the wages they used to. If it's a depressed area, you may not be able to get double what you've got in it.

  5. #5
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    2,882
    This is a hard one because she is a family member and you made the quilt without the intention of getting paid for it.

    If it was someone you don't know asking for a quilt, it is easy. It depends if you want to make the quilt for sale or not. Many people enjoy just making them to give away. Once you start taking orders it can become a chore. This is under your control. If I don't want to make the quilt I ask for a lot of money. Usually I don't hear from them again.

    I prefer to make a quilt I like and then sell it. When they start asking for particular colors the headache begins. If I decide to make the quilt I make them buy the fabric and the pattern (or at least select the pattern) so there is no possibility of confusion or the colors not being the right shade, tone or value. I am also very clear about the size. I explain that I then have to charge for hours of work, and I don't sell myself short.

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,923
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have an elderly lady friend that is having a "living" estate sale. She is selling her home and moving into a retirement apartment.
    She has 4 tops she wants to sell...one is from keepsake quilting, it is the falling leaves one..it cost over $100 for that kit back in 2000...they lady doing the estate sale told her she would be lucky to get $25 for it!!!

    making to sell is road not worth going down...especially in todays market...people just don't understand what it costs to make a quilt.

  7. #7
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    15,694
    Blog Entries
    2
    just say NO. when i first started quilting i made my sister one and she then said a friend of hers wanted a Wedding Ring quilt. i have yet to make one and it's been over 20 years!

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Merced, CA
    Posts
    4,230
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan
    just say NO. when i first started quilting i made my sister one and she then said a friend of hers wanted a Wedding Ring quilt. i have yet to make one and it's been over 20 years!
    ------------------------------------------------------
    I would have said it was marvelous the friend loved the quilt, that I would teach HER how to make one for HER friend.

    Bet that would have changed her mind right there.

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,342
    You should get out at least what you put into it for materials. From there you need to decide if you would be making this as a means of just giving you something to do or as a means of earning a little extra and if so how much extra. Then find out how much they would be willing to pay and work from there. Make sure if you do agree to make one that they agree and pay for at least materials up front and that amount is NONrefundable.

  10. #10
    Super Member owlvamp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    6,450
    Blog Entries
    2
    Someone will come by and tell you. I am going to watch this topic. I never know either.

  11. #11
    TheSevenYearStitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Norman, OK
    Posts
    208
    For family, I would do everything I could to not be paid. It just doesn't seem right. However, if she insisted, I would throw out some low-ball figure like $50. I'd be afraid of causing offense if I asked for double the cost of it--I always spend waaaay to much on quilting supplies!

  12. #12
    Senior Member quilticing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Lake City, MI
    Posts
    579
    If you don't give it, friends and family can AT LEAST pay for supplies and LA expense.

  13. #13
    Junior Member Panchita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Chester, England
    Posts
    295
    Hello,

    Can't help on the selling price to non-family, but for your family member what about asking for a donation to a chosen charity instead of payment to you?

    You would need to make it clear that this is a family-rate situation only (i.e. hugely discounted) if you do ever go down the sale-to-strangers route.

    Panchita

  14. #14
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    chicago, IL
    Posts
    9,692
    Quote Originally Posted by TheSevenYearStitch
    For family, I would do everything I could to not be paid. It just doesn't seem right. However, if she insisted, I would throw out some low-ball figure like $50. I'd be afraid of causing offense if I asked for double the cost of it--I always spend waaaay to much on quilting supplies!
    I would probably do the same thing...but this is a special family price...to anyone else it will be cost of materials +++++

  15. #15
    Senior Member wvhill22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    662
    Blog Entries
    9
    When you start doing it for money it doesn't become fun anymore

  16. #16
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,723
    Just say no...thanks for the compliment....Most people will not pay the cost it takes to make a quilt and expect for 1/2 nothing. Unless you really love quilting and are not interested in making money then take it on and have fun ..Or give them your honest figure and I bet they don't bit....But make sure they know the cost before you start buying fabrics...You might want to get a deposit if they are serious of 1/2 the cost of the fabric. This way if they back out you have something on the cost.

  17. #17
    Senior Member sandrab64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Wanamingo, MN
    Posts
    392
    I paid $150 for all materials to make a quilt for my aunt. She paid me for the materials and then asked what I wanted on top of that. I told her to just buy me an icecream cone. She later gave me another $150 for all my hard work. I turned around and went right to the LQS and bought a lovely kit for $152 to make for myself! That's payment enough for me!

  18. #18
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,998
    Quote Originally Posted by wvhill22
    When you start doing it for money it doesn't become fun anymore
    That's the truth!!!

    If someone asks me about what a quilt is worth I tell them, "if I were to make this quilt for money, I would have to charge... $$$$(fill in the blank). That usually stops any thoughts of payment. By the time you add up the cost of the fabric and count the hours you worked on it, the cost is up there. Use minimum wage times your time..... WOW!

  19. #19
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,895
    I used to make quilts to sell and it was still fun. Just figure how much time it takes you to make the quilt. For instance, how long does it take to make a block TIMES how many blocks are in the quilt. Don't forget your time to get the fabric, washing, pressing, cutting, etc. Add 20% for all those things you forgot.
    Now, how much do you want to make per hour? Are you happy making $1 an hour, I know I am not. However, I don't need to make as much as someone going out to a job, as I don't have the expenses of commuting, work clothes, etc.

    I would never do it for twice the materials costs. I tend to buy things on sale. When you get a job done by a plumber, carpenter, or auto mechanic, you are paying twice what they paid for materials and THEN they add in their labor costs.


    PS - if they don't want to pay the price you come up with, smile sweetly and say, "Try Kmart, I'm sure you'll find something you like there..."

    PPS (not really, that's kind of snarky. But you can think it.)

  20. #20
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Keller, TX
    Posts
    7,516
    Agree will all of the above - don't lose the joy for the money. Be so proud of the compliment and enjoy doing it for yourself. good luck either way.

  21. #21
    Super Member janRN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    western Pa
    Posts
    4,601
    I've seen mentioned that you double or triple the cost of your supplies. I just recently saw table runner kits in Keepsake Quilting catalog for $69 tp $99.00. Would someone really pay over $200 for a table runner?? Also, who would pay that much for a kit? In the area I live there is high unemployment and table runners don't sell for over $45. I can't imagine someone around here paying over $200 for a quilt. Whenever someone asks me if I'd sell them a quilt, I always tell them my quilts start at $200 for a baby quilt. They quickly change their minds; I don't want to sell my quilts anyhow. Like someone said, it takes the fun out of sewing. I'm unemployed and the money would certainly help but it's not worth the aggravation to me (just a personal opinion).

  22. #22
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,873
    Tell her what the true cost of it would be: the cost of the LA and the fabric. Then tell her the cost if you were to sell it (2-3x the cost). Tell her if she insists on throwing some money towards what you have done (if it was a gift) would she please make a donation to _______________________. Problem solved. She feels good, you feel good, if someone wants to buy one, the price is clear.

  23. #23
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    rural Maryland
    Posts
    1,566
    The only person I ever found who was willing to pay what a quilt is really worth was another crafts person. There is a lady in our community who had been a musuem curator. She had a number of quilt tops her grandmother had made. She paid me to handquilt them for her. She owns a shop that does custom framing and understands the value of craftwork. I basically charged her $.07 a square inch plus my finishing materials, back, batting and binding. She had no problem forking over the money. She admitted that she makes most of her living selling her work at craft events in the Washington DC area where people are more willing to pay for what they want.

  24. #24
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Monroe, IN
    Posts
    2,285
    Quote Originally Posted by TheSevenYearStitch
    For family, I would do everything I could to not be paid. It just doesn't seem right. However, if she insisted, I would throw out some low-ball figure like $50. I'd be afraid of causing offense if I asked for double the cost of it--I always spend waaaay to much on quilting supplies!


    Agreed! I hate trying to explain to a family member how much it costs to make a quilt. They just don't understand. The $50 figure would seem like a good one....enough to make the relative feel like they paid for it, but not too much to offend.

    As for anyone else asking for a quilt....give them a "real" price and make it high enuf that they won't want it anymore!

  25. #25
    Senior Member SharBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    472
    I would tell your Aunt that what you made it as a gift from your heart to her. That should stop her from asking for a price! Also, if someone want's you to make one for them just say - no, I'm sorry, this is what I do for pleasure and the pressure of a business arrangement would take all the pleasure away for me.

    I find that if you phrase things such that to do what "they" want would be hurtful to you "they" back right off!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.