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Thread: Sewing machine table

  1. #1
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    What should the height of a sewing machine table be. My hubby wants to make me one.

    Another question..How do you make an ironing board that works good with quilts..

    Thanks so much..

  2. #2
    Senior Member gailmitchell's Avatar
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    My hubby made me an ironing board something like the "Big Boards". The top is rectangle and measures about 22 x 60. I absolutely love it. Basically he made it out of a half a piece of plywood, and then put cleats on the under side so it would fit my traditional ironing board. I then covered it with a couple of layers of discount fabric.

    Although when it comes time to iron an shirt, there's no pointy end for the sleeves. Oh, well.

  3. #3
    Super Member seamstome's Avatar
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    I think 29 inches or 29 1/2 inches is the standard.

  4. #4
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    Standard tables are 30" tall. I think a good height for a sewing table is 27-28".

  5. #5
    Marjpf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gailmitchell
    My hubby made me an ironing board something like the "Big Boards". The top is rectangle and measures about 22 x 60. I absolutely love it. Basically he made it out of a half a piece of plywood, and then put cleats on the under side so it would fit my traditional ironing board. I then covered it with a couple of layers of discount fabric.

    Although when it comes time to iron an shirt, there's no pointy end for the sleeves. Oh, well.
    My board is similar, but I had DH drill some holes in it so it wouldn't be so heavy.

  6. #6
    Member sunlover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gailmitchell
    My hubby made me an ironing board something like the "Big Boards". The top is rectangle and measures about 22 x 60. I absolutely love it. Basically he made it out of a half a piece of plywood, and then put cleats on the under side so it would fit my traditional ironing board. I then covered it with a couple of layers of discount fabric.

    Although when it comes time to iron an shirt, there's no pointy end for the sleeves. Oh, well.
    Who irons anymore? I hang my stuff the minute it comes out of the dryer and I never (rarely) iron anything anymore. Am I the only one?????????

  7. #7
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I would sit down at the table and measure the height that will be comfortable for you. I am short, so my needs/comfort is different from most :D:D:D

  8. #8
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I read somewhere that the height should be adjusted to the individual user. It's height from floor to arm-height (bent at a 90 degree angle) or a little lower. If it's higher, the sewer tends to pull up on the shoulders and tightening the muscles. ....and yes, my table is way too high. sigh

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunlover
    Quote Originally Posted by gailmitchell
    My hubby made me an ironing board something like the "Big Boards". The top is rectangle and measures about 22 x 60. I absolutely love it. Basically he made it out of a half a piece of plywood, and then put cleats on the under side so it would fit my traditional ironing board. I then covered it with a couple of layers of discount fabric.

    Although when it comes time to iron an shirt, there's no pointy end for the sleeves. Oh, well.
    Who irons anymore? I hang my stuff the minute it comes out of the dryer and I never (rarely) iron anything anymore. Am I the only one?????????
    I still iron some of my clothes. DH's shirts, my work pants, skirts, etc. Even when I pull them out of the dryer. I guess I'm the rare one who likes to iron.

  10. #10
    Super Member IrishNY's Avatar
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    Other than fabric for quilts or WIPs, I couldn't tell you the last time I ironed. And I'm glad. :D :D

  11. #11
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    I still iron too. I just like the look of starched cotton shirts and creased demins, I guess. But I have a lot of "at home" clothes I wouldn't iron, ever!

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the answers. we are going tomorrow to buy the lumber. Don't know how long it will take to make it..LOL

  13. #13
    Junior Member kayquilt's Avatar
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    I'm a ironer too, just don't like wrinkled clothes. I even iron or press my "good" knit tops. They just look better.

  14. #14
    Super Member carrieg's Avatar
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    The table height will depend on if your machine drops down into the table, or sits on top. Although, if you get a chair that adjusts, that can make a difference.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by gailmitchell
    My hubby made me an ironing board something like the "Big Boards". The top is rectangle and measures about 22 x 60. I absolutely love it. Basically he made it out of a half a piece of plywood, and then put cleats on the under side so it would fit my traditional ironing board. I then covered it with a couple of layers of discount fabric.

    Although when it comes time to iron an shirt, there's no pointy end for the sleeves. Oh, well.
    Cut the cuff off, its so much easer.

  16. #16
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gailmitchell
    My hubby made me an ironing board something like the "Big Boards". The top is rectangle and measures about 22 x 60. I absolutely love it. Basically he made it out of a half a piece of plywood, and then put cleats on the under side so it would fit my traditional ironing board. I then covered it with a couple of layers of discount fabric.

    Although when it comes time to iron an shirt, there's no pointy end for the sleeves. Oh, well.
    You could get a small pointy-end ironing board (little legs on it) to sit on top of your rectangle one, if you had a need for one. I bought a real cheap flimsy one many years ago, but I now see better and more expensive ones in Joann's. As I have no need for another one, I haven't researched to see what is available.

  17. #17
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftinggrandma
    What should the height of a sewing machine table be. My hubby wants to make me one.

    Another question..How do you make an ironing board that works good with quilts..

    Thanks so much..
    Sewing table height depends on your height.

    As for an ironing board, I used a piece of luann (a very light & cheap plywood) 2 x 4' and hubby nailed stoppers on the bottom of it that just fit over the point of a regular ironing board so that you can slide it back just enough that the point is left to sit the iron on.

    I covered the luann with the thermal insulbright batting-shiny side up and covered the batting with an ugly piece of cotton plaid. Then I covered that with the teflon type ironing board fabric. The batting & fabric are just wrapped around to the back and stapled on.

    I think we spent less than $20 on the entire project--much cheaper than a "real" big board. It's a little smaller than a "real" big board but if it was any larger, it would be harder to move it off & on. It takes up a lot of space so mine is usually leaning on a wall, out of the way until I need it.

    I'll run downstairs and take pictures to attach.....

    Front (top) side
    Name:  Attachment-41218.jpe
Views: 8
Size:  45.7 KB

    Back (bottom) side
    Name:  Attachment-41219.jpe
Views: 15
Size:  51.8 KB

    Ready to use
    Name:  Attachment-41447.jpe
Views: 10
Size:  39.1 KB

  18. #18
    gailalter's Avatar
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    Great job!

  19. #19
    Senior Member schwanton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftinggrandma
    What should the height of a sewing machine table be. My hubby wants to make me one.

    Another question..How do you make an ironing board that works good with quilts..

    Thanks so much..
    My sewing machine table is an adjustable height. It stands at 27-1/2" high. (I am 5'6"). It is the perfect height for a portable machine on top.

  20. #20
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    I am to old fashioned & I still iron because I like the look of a smoother fabric. For me, it just seems finished with a good press even right out of the dryer.

  21. #21
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunlover
    Quote Originally Posted by gailmitchell
    My hubby made me an ironing board something like the "Big Boards". The top is rectangle and measures about 22 x 60. I absolutely love it. Basically he made it out of a half a piece of plywood, and then put cleats on the under side so it would fit my traditional ironing board. I then covered it with a couple of layers of discount fabric.

    Although when it comes time to iron an shirt, there's no pointy end for the sleeves. Oh, well.
    Who irons anymore? I hang my stuff the minute it comes out of the dryer and I never (rarely) iron anything anymore. Am I the only one?????????
    I only iron fabric. that's it.

  22. #22
    Super Member chamby's Avatar
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    I agree with kquilt. I iron as well. However, I iron when I get ready to wear the article. I just can't stand to wear something with wrinkles. I do not care if you hang it up straight out the dryer, it still has wrinkles.
    I also use my iron a lot when sewing.

  23. #23
    Super Member MISHNJIM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    I read somewhere that the height should be adjusted to the individual user. It's height from floor to arm-height (bent at a 90 degree angle) or a little lower. If it's higher, the sewer tends to pull up on the shoulders and tightening the muscles. ....and yes, my table is way too high. sigh
    Yes...And I go through that all the time. My shoulders are always tight and sore the next day if I've sewed for a very long time. I've been also having trouble lately from my elbows to my fingers going numb & tingly.

  24. #24
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    I worked for years in a sewing factory. Each machine had a different function so different heights were necessary, however, for stitching as we do while quilting, typical height is between 26 to 29 inches. Sit with your back comfortably straight (don't over do it), your hips and knees at 90 degree angles. Next hold your elbows slightly above or below a 90 degree angle. where your wrists lay will give you a pretty good idea of height. If you DH builds with wooden legs, have him make it a little taller than what you think you need, that way you can sew on it for a few days and he can always shorten the legs easily.

    If your shoulders hurt and you find yourself stooping over at the neck, it is too short. If your shoulders hurt because you are having to lift your hands hight (elbows at wrong angle) than it is too tall.

    Also, a cheap chair from discount store that adjusts height would be great. Some days you need a little height, some days you may want to be a little lower.

    Hope this helps sorry so long winded.

  25. #25
    Senior Member foxxigrani's Avatar
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    If you get your cutting area too high you can always stand on something but if its too short, you are right back where you started from, putting things under legs. I would much rather have it higher than I need. As for ironing, I still iron, like that crisp look and no wrinkles. Taking them out of dryer which I don't use often, just isn't good enough, no ironed arms and even the body doesn't have that crisp look. To each thier own I guess on everything including your cutting table. Whatever works for you.

    Rita

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