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Thread: sewing over pins

  1. #51
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    If a pin is hit at full speed, one of several things will happen:

    1) Nothing unusual
    2) Bend or break the pin - and pieces may be hard to find
    3) Dull or bend the needle
    4) Break the needle - and pieces can fly in your face or get in the guts of your machine

  2. #52
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    I have an older computerized Janome and I occasionally sew over pins with no problems (usually because I didn't see them). I didn't know anything about the timing thing, I just thought it might break my needle.

  3. #53
    Super Member lalaland's Avatar
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    I sew over my pins but I only use the silk pins with the balls on the end.

  4. #54
    Senior Member Quilting Grandma's Avatar
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    I own a computerized Janome and would never sew over pins. Why take chances?

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    the "official" answer is that we shouldn't sew over pins. even if your machine can take the lickin', hitting a pin can damage or break a needle. and, as somebody already pointed out, it's a serious safety hazard.

    i'll give you three guesses who sews over her pins anyway. and she has two fancy shmancy machines.

    i'll give you three more guesses who has gotten very good at digging bent pins out of the bobbin area.

    three more to figure out who has knots in her stomach every time - wondering if this will be the time she has to take the baby into the shop.

    :roll: :lol:
    I sewed a thin flower headed pin right down into my bobbin case, too! Freaked me out! I did have to take the machine in because my thread started breaking after that. Thankfully it was $15 part and my labor was covered under the extended warranty. Whew. Much more careful now.

  6. #56
    Senior Member borntoquilt's Avatar
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    Ladies and Gents! If you pin your stuff from the fabric side towards the raw edge-(left to right instead of raw edge to fabric) you will NEVER have a problem. Don't ask me how or why this works but it does. I have been pin-ing this way for years and never had a problem..... give it a try.....

  7. #57
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    I have looked at every pin out there. The only one thin enough to be safe sewing over (most of the time) is the blue flower one by Clover. There are several Clover pins of various colors. The only one safe because it's the thinnest is the BLUE.

    I have a new Brother sewing/embroidery machine. Now there have been times when my needle has struck one of the pins. Usually the needle glances off of it, but every now and then the needle will actually bend the pin. I remove the pins most of the time when I get to them. But have "runover" them often too.

  8. #58
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    Please DON'T sew over pins, not only is it hard on the machine, it dulls and normally eventually breaks the needle and can be dangerous. If the pin gets hit just right it could break and cause it to fly right out of the material. I have had needles to break and fly all over, finding parts of the needle some time later. Please don't mess up your machine but sewing over pins. No matter what they say the machine can do. I always slow down and take my pins out when I get to them while sewing. Be careful!!!

  9. #59
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    I borrowed my mother's back-up Viking and paid a $100 repair bill cuz I threw the timing off when I hit a pin. That being said, I know it's not good to do it but occasionally I still do it in tricky situations with my Janome. I've broken needles doing it too so you'd think I'd learn...LOL

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by borntoquilt
    Ladies and Gents! If you pin your stuff from the fabric side towards the raw edge-(left to right instead of raw edge to fabric) you will NEVER have a problem. Don't ask me how or why this works but it does. I have been pin-ing this way for years and never had a problem..... give it a try.....
    I'm left handed so this is the way I ALWAYS pin. But you must be luckier than I am cuz I've certainly hit pins this way!

  11. #61
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    i would never sew over a pin it can damage your machine

  12. #62
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    I remove the pins, if I pin at all. God bless. Penny

  13. #63
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    Guess I should explain...(the left to right (raw edge) pin-ing.) The "TIP" of my pin is NOT in the seam allowance so the needle doesn't come in contact with the pin. I use a 1/4 seam allowance so you can get the tip really close to the raw edge without it being IN the line of fire. I learned this years ago from a college level quilting professor. Use whatever method works for you.... ta ta !!!

  14. #64
    Super Member Vanuatu Jill's Avatar
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    I never sew over pins-I have a magnetic "pin catcher" which just sits in the space to the right of the needle (don't know what that space is called-maybe the throat)and as I approach a pin, I remove it with my right hand and just let it drop on that pin catcher. I don't even have to stop sewing once I get my rhythm going. They are sort of like a flexible frig magnet some people give printed with their business card, only larger to fit in that open space on the machine. I have had it for years and it a great help.

  15. #65
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    Sounds like something someone should market...

  16. #66
    Super Member Vanuatu Jill's Avatar
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    I THINK I bought it at Joann's several years ago. It sticks to my machine with adhesive backing so it can't slip while working. It measures about 2 3/4 x 4 3/4 and is called "pin catcher" a magnitized pin cushion. You may still be able to get them on line.

  17. #67
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    Thankx, next time I'm in JoAnn's I'll look for you...great.

  18. #68
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    Actually, going today (IF I can tear myself away from this computer!!) But you are a little far away! See you in spirit though! I'll check while there for you-but sometimes they have more stuff on-line, and since their notions wall is 50% off, it might be pretty picked-over. We'll see.

  19. #69
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    If you sew over a pin with a computerized machine it will screw up the adjustments of the computer. My machine repair shop states that after a computerized machine is adjusted, set it up and leave it. Every time you move it, it will shift some of the computer adjustments. When I want to sew over a pin, I stitch just up to the pin and use the handwheel to jump over it. If the needle will hit it, you can make adjustments before it dulls the needle or worse.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by QBeth
    Everyone is probably going to tell you the same thing.... DON'T sew over pins! It can damage the innards of your machine. That said, I do sew over pins on my 20 year old Pfaff but they're the very thin flower head pins and I go very slowly over them.

    Now we'll see what everyone else has to say, huh? :-)
    I agree with this. My machine isn't a Pfaff or 20 yrs old, and I do use long "thin" pins, and although you shouldn't sew over pins, I do. I go slow over them. I think that's the key. You wouldn't want to hit one going full out. You might put out an eye or something. Just be careful.

  21. #71
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    A couple of people have told me that the computer in a sewing machine can be messed up by anything magnetic that is too close to the motor. Anybody know anything about that?

  22. #72
    Super Member Deborah12687's Avatar
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    I do know that when I was sewing next to my microwave in the kitchen I got one heck of a jolt from the motor of my old Singer sewing machine. I saw the electrical shock...it was very blue. Computers next to a motor may cause the same kind of reaction.

  23. #73
    Kas
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheresaP.
    I have looked at every pin out there. The only one thin enough to be safe sewing over (most of the time) is the blue flower one by Clover. There are several Clover pins of various colors. The only one safe because it's the thinnest is the BLUE.

    I have a new Brother sewing/embroidery machine. Now there have been times when my needle has struck one of the pins. Usually the needle glances off of it, but every now and then the needle will actually bend the pin. I remove the pins most of the time when I get to them. But have "runover" them often too.
    It's the blue flower one that I sent down into the feed dogs and through the race. They are so thin, they bend easily. Mine is almost bent all the way back onto itself!

  24. #74
    Senior Member patsyo56721's Avatar
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    TheresaP That is what I have been told also.

  25. #75

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    My Bernina is 26 years old and I always sew over pins - but carefully!

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