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Thread: Since we're talking about hand-quilting...

  1. #26
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I recently finished one that took me 14 months. I was working full time and only worked on it for an hour or so in the evenings. I worked on it more on the weekends but it has a lot of quilting in it. Hand quilting is relaxing to do in the evenings.

  2. #27

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    Question? Is it better to press the seams open if you are going to hand quilt? Is there a time that pressing them open is O.K.

  3. #28
    Senior Member Hinterland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by great oma
    Question? Is it better to press the seams open if you are going to hand quilt? Is there a time that pressing them open is O.K.
    Some quilters press seams open, so long as the block is machine pieced. For a hand pieced block, the seams are pressed to the side to keep the batting from leaking through. It's supposed to be stronger, too.

    I am working on an applique top, where I machine pieced the background. Because I'm going to hand quilt it I pressed the seams open. I'm hoping it works out okay.

    Janet

  4. #29
    Senior Member Happy Treadler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sueisallaboutquilts
    Quote Originally Posted by Hinterland
    Quote Originally Posted by Pennylane
    But I am not sure if you trace the whole quilting pattern on the fabric at once or in small sections as you quilt.
    I usually mark the section I'm working on as I go - otherwise the chalk marks disappear.
    Same here, and yes, practice will make all the difference!
    Enjoy it, that's what I love about it- so relaxing~
    I learned that marking as you go works much better, too, by trial & error. I marked a whole quilt & as I worked on it the lines started disappearing. I found I can actually use the bottom of my lap quilt hoop (flat wood) as a 'table' to mark the blocks as I work on them. Works great!

    Trina

  5. #30
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    Well, I must admit that I hand sew the top and the backing (for my wholecloths) and I press the seams open. It is easier to quilt through and the seams don't stand out so much. I have never had any problems with the batting leaking through. The seam line is crossed so many times with the hand quilting that I am not afraid the seam won't be strong enough.

  6. #31
    Senior Member Hinterland's Avatar
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    But Andrea, your stitches are so small it's almost like machine sewing. :)

    Janet

  7. #32
    Super Member KarenBarnes's Avatar
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    I think it depends on the size of the quilt and how many other WIP you have! I'm working on a super king that has been put aside for 5 years. No marking involved but time consuming. Really would like to finish it on my new quilter but feel it wouldn't look right to combine types of stitching on this quilt. This quilt has become a priority so I don't begin to hate it and not want to use it!

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hinterland
    But Andrea, your stitches are so small it's almost like machine sewing. :)

    Janet
    You may be right! I try to make my sewing stitches as small as my quilting stitches...

    :wink:

  9. #34
    Super Member Leota's Avatar
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    I just finished quilting my very first "real" quilt. I started it in November 2009... It's a crib size D9P and I FMQ dog bones on the narrow sides and hand quilted the small squares. All total (not counting the 8 months I didn't work on it at all) I guess it took me about 30 hrs. to piece and quilt. I could only work a couple of hours at a time on the FMQ because of shoulder fatigue and the hand quilting, I could do 2 squares in about 15 mins. Yesterday, was a perfect quilting day because of the cold and blizzard and I finished all but six square "couples" and this morning, I finished the "single" squares on the edges. It's ready for binding and then I'll deliver it to the precious baby who will be 1 year old this month...
    I really need to work on my speed.. ha ha...
    I have a King size sampler I started in 1992, sandwiched in 2006 and only have the center of the log cabin hand quilted... that's going to take a really long time to finish... it keeps getting pushed to the back burner...

  10. #35
    Super Member KarenBarnes's Avatar
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    At the quilt show this past weekend I found an awesome pen! You can mark the quilt (the seller said hers had been marked for 2 months at least) and when done apply heat. It takes about 120 degrees for the mark to go away. I'm so excited to use it on the next quilt!

  11. #36
    Senior Member Happy Treadler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KarenBarnes
    At the quilt show this past weekend I found an awesome pen! You can mark the quilt (the seller said hers had been marked for 2 months at least) and when done apply heat. It takes about 120 degrees for the mark to go away. I'm so excited to use it on the next quilt!
    Hey Karen, can you tell us what it was called? Can you only get them at quilt shows? Do they sell different colors, and are they like a type of ink or pencil?

    Sorry for so many questions, but I'm curious!

    Trina :)
    (who's stuck inside again due to ice)

  12. #37
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    I hand quilted a King Size in about 4 1/2 weeks, that was about all I did at the time, quilted everyday, and evening. I really enjoy hand quilting, it is worth every minute of my time. Making and hand quilting for my 10 grandchildren and my 4 children, and they all are looking forward to qetting their quilts. Just keep at it and you will soon get your quilt finished.

  13. #38
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    Let us know what the brand of marking pencil you have.

  14. #39
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    This depends a lot on what you use to mark your design with. If you use a disappearing ink marker(purple one end,blue other end) then just mark as much as you can do before it starts to leave. I lkie to use a hard sliver of hand soap. You can mark a whole section or row with this and it does not disappear on you. There are several things on the market. I still prefer the soap. Marvel

  15. #40
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    Hi, Good question. Our church group was quilting a queen size and kept track of each hour worked on. Every hour by each person it all added up to 51 hours. It was a labor of Love and it peases the soul. So a safe guess would be about 40 to 45 hours for a double bed size. Its so relaxing the time seems to fly. As you quilt it goes faster. Remember to take small breaks and flex those muscles. Good Luck. Marvel

  16. #41
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    I also do not keep track of my time. I have 3 quilts that I am quitling at the same time. I get tired of one then go to one of the others and back and forth. That way I don't get tired of any of them (well not too much anyway lol). Plus I do not quilt everyday like I want to...life and work gets in my way... sometimes I wish I was retired and can quilt everyday all day, but gotta pay the bills.

  17. #42
    Super Member dphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KS quilter
    I have handquilted for a long time; for a queen/king size it
    takes me a couple months. I quilt a few hours most evenings
    and more on weekends. I have never kept track of the exact
    hours. Then again, once or twice on each quilt I have to lay it aside for a few days while my fingers heal. For me,I find that Zinc Oxide Ointment helps me heal more than anything else I've tried. Don't find it at Walmart, but our local drug store carries it. One time I found it in the 'baby' section...it is suppose to be good for diaper rash. When hand quilting a large quilt, it does seem like
    a long time, but that is my favorite part of quilting. If you just quilt 15 or 20 minutes here and there, you will be surprised how that time accumulates.
    It sounds like I wrote this...except I use Curads extra-length clothlike bandaids rather than a thimble. I still have to stop and let me fingers heal though.

  18. #43
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    I've been doing so much embroidery lately, it's causing me to want to learn, but how would I find someone to teach me? Is this something LQS typically do?

  19. #44
    Senior Member Hinterland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catrancher
    I've been doing so much embroidery lately, it's causing me to want to learn, but how would I find someone to teach me?
    Depends on the local quilt shop. I'm thinking about teaching hand quilting, but I haven't gotten past the thinking stage yet. I know my LQS hasn't offered any hand sewing classes in a long time, but I don't know if that's their choice or if they can't find a teacher. Another LQS has offered hand quilting in the past.

    I taught myself by reading books on quilting; today you can find tutorials on line that will show you how. And if you ask a question here someone will know the answer.

    Janet

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hinterland
    Quote Originally Posted by catrancher
    I've been doing so much embroidery lately, it's causing me to want to learn, but how would I find someone to teach me?
    Depends on the local quilt shop. I'm thinking about teaching hand quilting, but I haven't gotten past the thinking stage yet. I know my LQS hasn't offered any hand sewing classes in a long time, but I don't know if that's their choice or if they can't find a teacher. Another LQS has offered hand quilting in the past.

    I taught myself by reading books on quilting; today you can find tutorials on line that will show you how. And if you ask a question here someone will know the answer.

    Good advice. Thanks!

    Janet

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by great oma
    Question? Is it better to press the seams open if you are going to hand quilt? Is there a time that pressing them open is O.K.
    If you plan to stitch in the ditch, don't press the seams open.

  22. #47
    Super Member KarenBarnes's Avatar
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    Regarding the pens I talked about earlier, I've been following a thread and this is what someone else posted...

    "I tried them and the marks ironed out beautifully but reappeared when I got the test fabric cold. I ironed again, washed in hot water, dried on medium heat and then subjected it to cold and they reappeared."

    So I guess I won't be using them like I thought I would. I'm still going to try them on a project just to practice. I've tried a large variety of pens and haven not found something that will last. I'd like to mark the top before sandwiching because it's easier but nothing ever lasts until I'm done stitching! When I'm handquilting I don't use a frame, I baste and stitch in my lap. I also go through thimbles like crazy! I can't use the metal/plastic ones because they don't fit my finger! I like the leather but needles go through them fairly soon. Guess I need to design my own leather one!

    The thread about pens was one about washable Crayola markers. Apparently some have had success with them...

  23. #48
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    I don't keep track of my time. I just did a quilt 84" square. It took me 4 months to quilt it. I worked 1 1/2 to 3 hours almost every night. I did have to put it away for a few days periodically to let my hands heal. I've tried all sorts of things to heal the cracks or prevent them in the first place, but nothing works for me so far.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hinterland
    Depends on the local quilt shop. I'm thinking about teaching hand quilting, but I haven't gotten past the thinking stage yet. I know my LQS hasn't offered any hand sewing classes in a long time, but I don't know if that's their choice or if they can't find a teacher. Another LQS has offered hand quilting in the past.

    I taught myself by reading books on quilting; today you can find tutorials on line that will show you how. And if you ask a question here someone will know the answer.

    Janet
    I teached hand quilting here in Germany and also in Luxemburg from 1998 to 2006 and started again last year. Although you find a lot of information in the internet, tutorials, videos etc. many people don't want to learn hand quilting that way. They prefer to learn from a teacher, spend some time with her/him in a workshop, they want to meet other quilters in person and they want somebody by their side for help and support! As far as I know we only have 3 or 4 teachers for hand quilting here and at the moment it seems to be only one (ME!) who is willing to travel for workshops.
    Janet, maybe it would be a wonderful option for quilters who want to learn if you offer workshops at your LQS. And it is also fun for the teacher! :)

  25. #50
    Super Member Iamquilter's Avatar
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    I just finished a quilt(queen size) that I put together for our school which is having a fund raiser spaghetti supper on the 13 of this month. I am a fast quilter. I put it on the frame on a Thrusday and by Sat. at 10:30 I had it finished. The kids put penquins on blocks that were 8x12. I went around the outside of the block and around the penguins.In regard to the marking. I use the Ultlimate marking pencil , if you mark it very light you will not see the markings and it will wash out after the first wash.

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