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Thread: So glad I prewashed - found an incurable (so far) bleeder

  1. #1
    Super Member LindaM's Avatar
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    So glad I prewashed - found an incurable (so far) bleeder

    So glad I prewashed the batiks for my next quilt - one of the blues is a bleeder.

    Machine washed the dark fabrics with colour catchers - which came out very dark blue. Tested all the fabrics, only one was bleeding.

    Hand washed the bleeder 3 x with Synthrapol & hot water. Rinsed and rinsed, still bleeding. Hand washed with vinegar. Rinsed, rinsed, rinsed. Still bleeding but just a little now. Machine Washed with Synthrapol again. And colour catchers. Still bleeding. Getting set aside for a project where it won't matter if it bleeds. Sigh.

    I have let the LQS know about the fabric, hopefully can spare someone else grief with this fabric.

    It's a beautiful fabric with a gradient - blues, aquas, turquoises.
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    Linda
    http://quiltingbiker.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    Senior Member Leslie333's Avatar
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    Bummer about the fabric, but at least you found out in advance of including it in a quilt.

  3. #3
    Super Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
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    I won't start cutting quilt pieces without treating the fabric to prevent bleeding. I use a dye-setter product on anything with really vibrant colors or deep colors --they're the ones most likely to bleed. If there's a white and a red or other bright color, I treat it. I can give you the name of the product, if you want -- just send me a pm!

    Jeanette

  4. #4
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    To stabilize the dye, you need to use Retayne.
    You can usually buy it at the same place as Synthropol.

    FYI the Synthropol is doing its intended job ... taking out the dyes.
    Normally it is the product to use when a colour bleeds into another to help take out the transferred dye.

    If used properly, Retayne will set the dyes in your fabric.
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  5. #5
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    I had the same problem with a dark teal solid I purchased for backing. Washed it too many times to remember and it still bleed. Wish I had known about Retayne when I bought the fabric.
    Singer 66 treadle, Singer 15-91, JC Penney 6923, Kenmore 50, White 2334, Brother 920D serger. RIP Singer 1036

  6. #6
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    I also just recently had a turquoise batik that wouldn't stop bleeding,even though I washed it with Synthropol. I washed it again with Retayne and a color catcher and the color catcher came out white so it seems to have worked.

  7. #7
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    That's a shame....it looks like a good amount of that fab too. I guess my question/concern is.......do the mfgrs use a retayne type product process to their products before sale.......I'm guessing not......seems a shame that at the retail price of fab it has to laundered before using.....should say that on the label.........just as pillows say DO Not Remove This Tag!!!!!!!!

  8. #8
    Super Member GingerK's Avatar
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    I have found that soaking the fabric in a water/vinegar/salt mixture also works. But definitely try the Retayne. It should solve your problems.
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down the their level and beat you with experience.

  9. #9
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    This is the perfect candidate for Retayne. Follow the directions carefully and then use cold water to wash any finished project as using hot water on fabric treated with Retayne only removes it ( the Retayne) and bleeding will most likely start again.

  10. #10
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    The only problem with Retayne is that the fabric should not be washed in hot water afterwards. I believe it takes away the dye-setting properties and allows the fabric to bleed again.

    The type of problem described in the original post occurs when the manufacturer fails to set the dye properly.

  11. #11
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    Just saw where it's suppose to be sold at Walmart. Will have to check.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GingerK View Post
    I have found that soaking the fabric in a water/vinegar/salt mixture also works. But definitely try the Retayne. It should solve your problems.
    Do you have the formula? I usually wash all my bedding covers in cold water. But would still like the formula. Thanks!

  13. #13
    Super Member LindaM's Avatar
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    The LQS where I purchased this fabric is also suggesting Retayne, and has some in stock. Have to pop there to pick some up tomorrow!
    Linda
    http://quiltingbiker.blogspot.com

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    This is the perfect candidate for Retayne. Follow the directions carefully and then use cold water to wash any finished project as using hot water on fabric treated with Retayne only removes it ( the Retayne) and bleeding will most likely start again.
    So, actually, there is no permanent fix for bleeders.....that's a dirty shame....the cost of these fabrics......and some are not practical for use...something very wrong with that picture.....

  15. #15
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LindaM View Post
    The LQS where I purchased this fabric is also suggesting Retayne, and has some in stock. Have to pop there to pick some up tomorrow!
    I've used it a lot on bleeders ... and have been quite happy!
    As a confidence booster, I do include a Dr. Beckmann's Colour Catcher ... and they always come out snow white!
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  16. #16
    Super Member MaryKatherine's Avatar
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    What was the brand of the Batik?
    marykayhopkins123.blogspot.com

  17. #17
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri B View Post
    So, actually, there is no permanent fix for bleeders.....that's a dirty shame....the cost of these fabrics......and some are not practical for use...something very wrong with that picture.....
    There are two types of bleeders. The one in the original post sounds like the type in which the dye was not permanently set by the manufacturer. That is the kind that will bleed forever. Retayne will set the dye, but only as long as the fabric is not washed in hot water.

    The other type of bleeder is one in which the manufacturer has not adequately rinsed out excess dye. Fibers can absorb only so much dye. Typically fabric is dyed with much more dye than the fabric can aborb; rinsing removes the excess dye particles. When the manufacturer doesn't do this adequately, a lot of loose dye comes out in the first wash. This is the type that sheds less and less dye with each washing.

    It's good to remember also that not all fabrics *pick up* loose dye particles easily. It's possible to have a bleeder fabric in a quilt and still not get dye stains in the other fabrics.

    Vinegar and salt work to set many types of organic dye, but generally have no effect on the newer chemical dyes used by modern manufacturers. They don't do any harm, but they don't necessarily do any good. If I were more of a scientist, I would probably take samples from all my stash fabrics and wash one set with vinegar/salt and the other with regular detergent to prove this.

  18. #18
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    I use Retayne quilt a bit. What bothers me most is when a fabric store states that their fabrics come from quality manufacturers and don't bleed. Maybe bleeding is less common in LQS fabrics, but it certainly exists. I think that is why it is important to bring a bleeder back to the LQS. Then they can contact the manufacturer if they choose and pull that bolt off the shelf.

  19. #19
    Super Member juneayerza's Avatar
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    This is one of the reasons to prewash. Better to loose the cost of one fabric versus the ruin of a whole project.
    June

  20. #20
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    That's why I prewash everything. As for that fabric, our guild was told by a very knowledgeable speaker to just get rid of it.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    There are two types of bleeders. The one in the original post sounds like the type in which the dye was not permanently set by the manufacturer. That is the kind that will bleed forever. Retayne will set the dye, but only as long as the fabric is not washed in hot water.
    Prism, you seem to know this stuff so I want to pick your brain a little...do you know what a manufacturer does to set modern dyes? What did they NOT do for this fabric?

    Mostly just curious, but wondering what it is that they do (or are failing to do) to set these dyes and if there's anything (other than Retayne) that can be done at home.

    I also never realized that hot water would wash Retayne back out...I don't use it often but that's good to know!

  22. #22
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    I had a similar problem with a bright green fabric - finally decided it wasn't worth taking a chance and use it. Tossed it so I wouldn't use it in the future by mistake.

  23. #23
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sewnoma View Post
    .........I also never realized that hot water would wash Retayne back out...I don't use it often but that's good to know!
    The label on the Retayne bottle explains to not use hot water after treating with Retayne.

    The newer bottles also have an update about using (or not using?) in front load machines ... I didn't pay attention to the instructions, being that I have a top loader.


    My experience has been that all fabrics have stopped their bleeds with Retayne. Sometimes I will wash it a 2 or 3 times to see if it stops bleeding. Sometimes I just go straight to Retayne after the first wash ... saves water and gets the job done sooner!!
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  24. #24
    Super Member NikkiLu's Avatar
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    I have thrown away a bright blue batik after "washing" it many, many times - trying many different things to get it to stop bleeding. I was using a pure white kitchen dish washing pan and when I would squeeze it, tons of blue dye would come out - my husband said it looked like an octopus squirting out his ink. So, threw it away. One other batik got thrown away and I think it had green and gold in it - same thing.
    Nikki in MO

  25. #25
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    I pre-wash my fabrics for just such a reason, about 99% of the time. Sometimes there is a fabric you don't suspect that will bleed.

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