Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 28

Thread: straight line quilting

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    246
    Blog Entries
    1

    straight line quilting

    I am going to do some straight line quilting on my machine. Do I start in the middle and work myself to the outside or go on either side going to the other side? I have glue basted and have decided to try this and not handquilt. Thanks for any comments.

  2. #2
    dd
    dd is offline
    Super Member dd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,817
    I always start in the middle. Not sure if it makes a difference but that's what I have always done.
    Blessed are the quilters, for they are the piecemakers.

  3. #3
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Delmarva Peninsula
    Posts
    1,167
    Blog Entries
    1
    I start in the middle, and use a walking foot.
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  4. #4
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    England Alton Towers
    Posts
    6,641
    Blog Entries
    1
    Always start in the middle using a walking foot. If you are doing straight parallel lines follow same rule as sewing up one way down the other. Make sure you also stop with needle down every time. I usually go from centre north south east and west then quilt rest.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  5. #5
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    29,697
    ​You are supposed to start in the middle and stitch outward with your walking foot so any extra fabric goes to the edge. Check your batting package for how far apart the lines of stitching can be.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,041
    I ususally start in the center and work out all four directions. and then alternate the direction of the stitching for the rest. That said- when using spray basting I do not think it really matters since the spray basting tends to hold the quilt top in place and it will not slide/move much during quilting. Also I just use my regular sewing foot when straight line stitching/SID. I can raise the pressfoot tension so I don't see much difference when not using the walking foot.

  7. #7
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    South central Nebraska, US
    Posts
    5,585
    All of the above is true BUT when I do kid's donation quilts (and I do a lot of them!) I simply start at one side and work in. The next line I reverse (just like in piecing long strips of fabric.) and my quilting always comes out really well.
    Have a great day sewing and remember to "not sweat the small stuff"!!



  8. #8
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    I never start in the middle and I always sew from the same side. As long as it's really well basted you don't have to start in the center.

  9. #9
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Monroe, IN
    Posts
    2,285
    I also glue baste with glue lines about 3" apart....I always start on one corner and go all the way across....and then go same direction with next line until I get that side done, then flip quilt around and do other side....if you have basted well enough, you will not have problems

  10. #10
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,823
    First I would have spray basted, then I would start at the edge about 1/2 way along the side and go across.
    Next. 1/2 way across the end and go the full length.

    After that I would continue on, wherever logical. As I get to the edge then I travel/stitch along the outside edge that will be covered with the binding to where I want to stitch next. If that's too far away, then I'd lockstitch leaving ends to bury. Then go to the next spot and start again. And so on!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  11. #11
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,890
    Blog Entries
    1
    I am amazed at all the recommendations to start in the middle when machine quilting!

    With traditional hand quilting in a hoop, it was advised to start in the middle to work any fullness out to the edges. When hand quilting on a frame, however, quilting was done along an edge and the quilt was rolled as quilting was finished.

    With machine quilting, assuming the quilt is well-basted, it is not necessary to start in middle. Especially with straight line quilting, starting at one edge and sewing to the other edge is a well-established technique. Starting in the middle is to be avoided as much as possible because of the problem of burying ends -- which is very time-consuming. It's possible to make several tiny stitches at beginning and end so hand burying thread is not necessary, but these stitches do show. Why bother with this at all when you can bury starts and stops in the edges?

    One warning I want to give about straight lines. If the quilt is well-basted and the lines do not cross, you will not have a problem. What is more difficult is when lines cross. If you are going to have straight lines cross in your quilt (as with crosshatching), then I recommend heavily starching the backing fabric before layering. Also recommend spray starching the top before layering. Also recommend using basting spray to join the layers. All of these techniques stabilize the layers so there is much less chance of fabric stretching as you sew. One of the big problems with crossing quilting lines is getting a little pucker or tuck right before you cross a line. This is caused by fabric stretching while you sew.

    Since you have already glue basted, I would recommend spray starching the top and backing before quilting. You can do this without pressing. Just lay the quilt on a large sheet on the floor, mist with spray starch, let dry (a fan speeds this up), then apply a few more layers of spray starch to each side. This helps keep the fabric from stretching while you sew.

  12. #12
    Senior Member tate_elliott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    351
    You don't say what size quilt you have. I make small, charity quilts and also glue baste. I have no problem sewing from side to side.

    On the other hand, I can't sew straight to save my life. I've tried using the pointer-guide-thingy on my walking foot, but it looks like I'm trying to meander. On my last one, I finally took the time to mark the crosshatching in Frixon pen. Problem solved! All my lines are straight as can be.

    Tate
    King of the Rocketeers!

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN
    Posts
    926
    I'm a newbie, and only have done 3 quilts, all with SID, cross hatch, X's, just basic. I pin, and start in the middle. I use a walking foot, and have not had any trouble with bunching, or threads nesting. The largest was queen sized and I just rolled and sewed. I pull my threads to the top, tie and cut. I've heard a lot about spray basting, but haven't tried it yet.

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Aust
    Posts
    1,503
    I always start in the centre!

  15. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,041
    No quilt police here!!!!!! Either way is ok and which is easier for you. To do straiught stitching I use blue painters tape. Tape is fairly cheap and can be used over again and does not leave residue! Good Luck!!!!

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Cleveland Ohio
    Posts
    305
    I am glad to see I am not the only one who uses the blue painters tape. I love that it comes in different widths.
    Dirty1mom
    Cleveland, OH

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    southeast iowa
    Posts
    2,739
    Just read through the entire thread. I've used spray baste and it works fine. But, I'm wondering, what in the world does glue baste mean? Thanks in advance for answering>

  18. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Posts
    132
    Glue baste means you use Elmer's School Glue to baste your sandwich. Drizzle it on. There's lots of threads here about it or you could do a Google search.

    I think you just need to jump in and start somewhere. That's how you learn. If it works out, great. If it doesn't try something else next time. Good luck and have fun.

  19. #19
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    ELVERTA, CA
    Posts
    15,178
    Blog Entries
    1
    I generally start in the middle and work to the outside. Then I turn the quilt and tackle the other half. Now some newbies mistake "middle" with "center" - For straight-line quilting I do NOT start in the center, rather at the edge of the center seam.

    My quilts are smoothed and basted really well but I still have some shift in the sandwich. If I started at the side, I would need to work out a lot of extra bulk by the time I get to the middle. So for me it makes more sense to start in the middle and work outward.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    674
    It depends on the quilt what I do and where I start. If it's a medallion, I anchor around the center. If it's a sampler, I do the sashing and then each individual block. I usually do a bed-sized quilt in sections. I often back-stitch if I'm at the edge but I do bury the knots if I'm working in the middle somewhere. It really varies. A few times a year I take a quilt to a long armer for an over-all pantagraph pattern.

  21. #21
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    28,394
    I always start quilting in the middle of the quilt and make a big cross. I then quilt in fourths until done. This works for me.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  22. #22
    Super Member nstitches4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Independence, MO
    Posts
    3,551
    I always start in the middle and work out.

  23. #23
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,890
    Blog Entries
    1
    If by "middle", posters mean the middle of an edge, then I am in complete agreement. What I do not recommend is starting in the center of a quilt. Sorry if I misunderstood the initial posts!

  24. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Silicon Valley in CA
    Posts
    1,638
    If I am doing straight lines from one edge to the other edge, I start at the edge and go to the other edge. This way you do not need to bury your ends because you will be putting on a binding. Also, every other line of stitching should start on the opposite side than you did the last line. If I am stitiching around objects or doing an outline stitch, I will start in the center and work myself out to the borders. I think as long as you have the quilt basted good, you should not have to worry about it shifting.

  25. #25
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    I don't like to baste so I do very little of it. I start in the center out and never have a problem with puckers or tucks ripply fabric. I smooth the layers as I go. I really learned a lot about straight line quilting from this book: One Line at a Time by Charlotte Warr Andersen
    Got fabric?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.