Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 5 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 102

Thread: Tangle Mess!

  1. #1
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Stanley NC
    Posts
    972

    Tangle Mess!

    I'm a newbie and I learned that all fabric should be washed before cutting and sewing. Did that and my material came out a tangled mess. Had to get scissors and snip out tangles from one material to another. What should I have done? Any suggestions or is this a common problem?

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,014
    Not that I know of. It is the nature of washing lots of smaller pieces together. Might put in mesh bags, but I've learned to live with it. Dont sheets and towels get tangled up in the wash?

  3. #3
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Stanley NC
    Posts
    972
    On a recent thread, someone suggested using a pinking rotary cutter to stop all the tangling of thread from the other pieces. Anyone tried one?

  4. #4
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    564
    I zigzag the raw edges of all my fabric before tossing it into the wash, using old crappy thread like Coats & Clark. Pinking shears work as well.

  5. #5
    Super Member CindyA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,223
    If you cut all raw edges with the pinking shears it won't be as bad. You won't have as much tangled mess to cut off and the fabric itself won't get wadded as tight. If I don't feel like using the pinking shears I just bring scissors and cut the mess off before I put it into the dryer.

  6. #6
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    6,764
    Serging the cut ends also works.
    One step at a time, always forward.

  7. #7
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Stanley NC
    Posts
    972
    Quote Originally Posted by GailG View Post
    Serging the cut ends also works.
    Thanks but don't have a serger. I hand piece.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Rubesgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tidewater Virginia
    Posts
    835
    You could try putting like colors in an old pillow case and tying it closed. Wash them as you usually would, then put the whole thing in the dryer with a couple of tennis balls to keep it from settling in one place. The fabrics are not directly subjected to the agitation of the machine and usually come out with fewer frayed ends and less tangled.
    Wendy in VA

    If I had a dollar for every time I got distracted I wish I had some ice cream.

  9. #9
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,662
    People here will give you as many ways to avoid the tangles as there are days in the month. Try as many as you want and when you find one that works for you, stick with it. I have, even though I've never heard of anyone else doing what I do.

    My method of choice is this. I prewash all fabrics, like colors together, on a gentle cycle in hot water, cold rinse. The fabrics do not tangle on gentle. I take each fabric out of the washer, one at a time, trim off any loose edge threads at that time and toss the fabric in the dryer, a very fast operation. I run the dryer about 20 minutes until they're just dry, take them out shortly after it stops, and fold them right away. Without loose threads, they do not tangle in the dryer. They don't get ironed until I'm ready to use them and they never get (or need) starch.

    My fabrics never tie themselves in knots, are never deeply creased or wrinkled, and I don't waste my time with pinking or clipping or serging or pinning or zigzagging or sewing the edges together or any of the other suggested solutions you'll get. The added bonus is I get to save the thread trash for art quilt embellishment.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  10. #10
    Senior Member QuiltingHaven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    881
    I always use my pinking rotary and trim the cut edges of the fabric - learned the hard way just like you. Also, if they are fat quarters on charms, I DON'T pink them but I do put them in a mesh bag (got them at walmart cheap) about 3-4 to a bag along with a color catcher in each bag and wash them in warm water with a cold rinse. They come out rather nicely. I don't pre-wash a kit, just too much trouble but I do make sure then to NOT was the backing for those so that they are all on the same shrink level. Hope this helps.
    Busy in Ohio

  11. #11
    Junior Member cad_queen_2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    soutwestern ontario
    Posts
    141
    I don't have pinking shears. I read someplace, (can't remember which magazine,) but i rip both ends of the fabric straight and snip a small piece of all four corners off (selveges), clean off all loose threads then wash. It doesn't eliminate the problem, but it does cut down on the tangled mess.

  12. #12
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Stanley NC
    Posts
    972
    Thanks for your reply! First of all, where did you buy your pinking rotary and why don't you pre-wash kits?

  13. #13
    Senior Member jcrilley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NE OH
    Posts
    559
    Blog Entries
    3
    I have had good results by just cutting a small triangle off each corner (1/4")

  14. #14
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    I solved the problem by quitting prewashing.

  15. #15
    Super Member Gail B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Smoky Lake, Alberta, Canada - Coolidge, AZ
    Posts
    1,545
    If you cut a tiny bit off each corner of the fabric it will hardly fray. Cut on an angle. I use to serge all my cut edges before washing now I just clip the corners. Much quicker & works wonderfully well.

  16. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by cad_queen_2000 View Post
    I don't have pinking shears. I read someplace, (can't remember which magazine,) but i rip both ends of the fabric straight and snip a small piece of all four corners off (selveges), clean off all loose threads then wash. It doesn't eliminate the problem, but it does cut down on the tangled mess.
    I don't rip the fabric but I do clip the little triangles off the corners. It really helps eliminate a lot of thread tangles.

  17. #17
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wine Country-Southern California
    Posts
    1,455
    I always use the pinking rotary cutter, really all but elimates the ravels, and since I don't always pre-wash everything, I know when I go to use the fabric latter, if it has a pinking edge I have washed it. I also think it helps if you use the most delicate cycle on your machine. USE PINKING ROTARY CUTTER

  18. #18
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Riverside Washington
    Posts
    1,513
    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    People here will give you as many ways to avoid the tangles as there are days in the month. Try as many as you want and when you find one that works for you, stick with it. I have, even though I've never heard of anyone else doing what I do.

    My method of choice is this. I prewash all fabrics, like colors together, on a gentle cycle in hot water, cold rinse. The fabrics do not tangle on gentle. I take each fabric out of the washer, one at a time, trim off any loose edge threads at that time and toss the fabric in the dryer, a very fast operation. I run the dryer about 20 minutes until they're just dry, take them out shortly after it stops, and fold them right away. Without loose threads, they do not tangle in the dryer. They don't get ironed until I'm ready to use them and they never get (or need) starch.

    My fabrics never tie themselves in knots, are never deeply creased or wrinkled, and I don't waste my time with pinking or clipping or serging or pinning or zigzagging or sewing the edges together or any of the other suggested solutions you'll get. The added bonus is I get to save the thread trash for art quilt embellishment.
    Me too! Works great!

  19. #19
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wine Country-Southern California
    Posts
    1,455
    Quote Originally Posted by teddysmom View Post
    Thanks for your reply! First of all, where did you buy your pinking rotary and why don't you pre-wash kits?
    It is a rotary cutting disc, that looks like a regular blade but have a wavy edge....You usually can find them anywhere you would find your regular blades. Joanns, Michaels, Hobby Lobby, I personally like Olfa, use your 40% coupons...
    One trick I have is multiple rotary handles...I have a 60mm, several 45mm, 28mm and a 18mm. Have them standing in a coffee Mug (broken handle).
    The pinking blade is also handy to fast grade a seam.

  20. #20
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    5,699
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    I solved the problem by quitting prewashing.
    Scissor queen is right prewashing is not necessary, you just need to test for bleeding prior to using fabric

  21. #21
    Super Member joysewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,408
    Quote Originally Posted by jcrilley View Post
    I have had good results by just cutting a small triangle off each corner (1/4")
    This is the same method I use and it works for me.
    Gloria 

  22. #22
    Senior Member Prissnboot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    778
    Someone referred to Coats & Clark thread as "crappy thread" - what kind of thread do you use to sew with? I'm not trying to hurt your feelings, I'm just wondering. I tend to sew my pieces together with really inexpensive serger thread spools, but use embroidery thread to do my quilting with. Do you have any suggestions that work better for you?
    She looks for wool and flax And works with her hands in delight.

  23. #23
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    5,882
    I also clip a triangle off of each corner, then simply clip any (usually only a few) frayed threads, as it comes out of the washer.
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

  24. #24
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wine Country-Southern California
    Posts
    1,455
    Quote Originally Posted by Prissnboot View Post
    Someone referred to Coats & Clark thread as "crappy thread" - what kind of thread do you use to sew with? I'm not trying to hurt your feelings, I'm just wondering. I tend to sew my pieces together with really inexpensive serger thread spools, but use embroidery thread to do my quilting with. Do you have any suggestions that work better for you?
    Go to website of Superior Threads, based out of Arizona. You will get a boat load of information about thread.
    I personally have been in your shoes, and used super cheap serger thread, and what ever else was handy. Do you clean your bobbin case when you put in a new full bobbin, ever wonder where all that lint comes from.....it comes from your THREAD...and can really damage your machine. I now only use the So Fine #50 from Superior and I have next to NO lint anywhere...it sews beautifully and I know the thread will last as long as the quilt fabric...

  25. #25
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    19,714
    Quote Originally Posted by happyquiltmom View Post
    I zigzag the raw edges of all my fabric before tossing it into the wash, using old crappy thread like Coats & Clark. Pinking shears work as well.
    I have some 20 year old quilts that are used almost everyday - they are our 'couch quilts' - used Coats & Clark dual duty thread (cotton over polyester) - the thread worked great in my machines - it's held up great in the quilts -hasn't 'cut' the cotton fabric - threads haven't broken -

    What is the problem with it - other than that it WAS available at stores like WalMart, Hancocks and JoAnn ???

    If any one wants to get rid of their old, awful, crappy, cotton-covered cotton over polyester Dual Duty Coats & Clark thread, I would be happy to pay postage costs to 'take it off their hands' and relieve them of the torture of using that kind of thread.

Page 1 of 5 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.