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Thread: Is there any reason I shouldn't...

  1. #1
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    Is there any reason I shouldn't...

    Is there any reason I shouldn't attach my raw edge applique at the same I machine quilt? I have attached the applique pieces with steam a seam and I thought that instead of doing a buttonhole stitch around each piece and then machine quilting all three layers... I would do it in one step and stitch around each piece while I am quilting through all three layers. Is this a terrible idea? I'm I just being lazy? Or is it a GREAT timesaver. Please let me know what you think. \\I have uploaded pictures before but tonight it doesn't work. Will try again later.

  2. #2
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    I cant see whynot...but you know someone will think of a reason not to.

  3. #3
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    I do it all the time. I asked this same question once and most responses were "go for it".
    I don't want to brag but I can still fit into the earrings I wore in high school.

  4. #4
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    I do it too and like the quilting effect?

  5. #5
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    One of my guild members showed us a quilt done this way at our last meeting. She is a very talented professional longarmer. If I understood the process - first she did an all-over on the pieced quilt, which was rectangles of neutral tones, then she laid down her applique pieces (fused to a very lightweight fusible) and stitched around them, then clipped the edges. Here's her blog showing the quilt and explaining the process - and I took the picture!

    http://jeanmcdaniel.wordpress.com/

  6. #6
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    I did and I posted a picture of the quilt I made. The post was - Raw edge applique - a few weeks ago. It came out great!

  7. #7
    Super Member LynnVT's Avatar
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    Oh, that is beautiful! Great pics, Dunster. Pat, looks as though you have a good answer. I've considered doing this, too, and now want to give it a try!

    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    One of my guild members showed us a quilt done this way at our last meeting. She is a very talented professional longarmer. If I understood the process - first she did an all-over on the pieced quilt, which was rectangles of neutral tones, then she laid down her applique pieces (fused to a very lightweight fusible) and stitched around them, then clipped the edges. Here's her blog showing the quilt and explaining the process - and I took the picture!

    http://jeanmcdaniel.wordpress.com/
    "The business of life is making memories. In the end, it is all we have." Butler Charlie Carson, Downton Abbey, season 4, episode 3, PBS.

  8. #8
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    No its done all the time, would be a real time saver as well
    Brother (XL-3500i, CV3550, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D), Juki MO-2000QVP, Handiquilter Avante

  9. #9
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    No reason you shouldn't or couldn't. Just remember what you do on the front will show on the back.

    Personally i think it looks just fine with the right patterns. Kind of makes it a 2 sided quilt.


  10. #10
    Senior Member lfletcher's Avatar
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    I have done this several times. Works well and is a timesaver.

  11. #11
    Super Member alfosa421's Avatar
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    Go for it!I have done this in the past with treat success and the back looks great too!

  12. #12
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    Ok, thanks everyone for your help. A special thanks to Dunster for the link which was great, and a special thanks to "Love to Sew". I went and checked out your quilt and it is great. I forgot to mention that I do not have a long arm. I am trying to do this on my domestic machine. You guys have inspired me so I am off to the sewing room to give it a try. Thanks again for all your help.

  13. #13
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    It is much easier . Recently we were doing an heirloom quilt in blocks. The instructions had us doing Trapunto and applique pieces on the block. The final instructions were to grid the background in 1/2inch squares and another section in1/4 inch squares but not same direction. This grid was terrible as you had to plan ech line and Line up over applique area. It was much easier when we changed it and gridded background first.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  14. #14
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    I had good intentions but, all my applique pieces began falling off. I repressed, but decided to go ahead and stitch them all down before I machine quilt. Oh well, I have a new idea for the next quilt. I will try again to post a picture when I finish.

  15. #15
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    The only drawback that I can see is scrunching the quilt up it's bound to mess up the applique before you have a chance to quilt it down. Also, the idea to do the overall quilting first is a really great idea. The class I'm taking now has us doing one block at a time backed with battilizer. We start with a 14" square, do an overall grid and then position the raw edge applique and use decorative stitches which goes through the top and the battilizer to attach the applique. It's nice to not have to worry about starting and stopping the quilting grid. We use paper backed fusible. If I have several layers, like in a flower, I will use the technique taught by Fons and Porter. (Which entails cutting the bulk of the fusible out and leaving a rough quarter inch around the edge of the applique.) After all the applique is done, I then trim down to 12 1/2" square. When it comes time to sew all the blocks together, I think I will not use batting since I will have all that battilizer in it. In that case, I will just quilt on the sashing.

    Would love to see a picture when you are done.

  16. #16
    Super Member blahel's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=dunster;5789000]One of my guild members showed us a quilt done this way at our last meeting. She is a very talented professional longarmer. If I understood the process - first she did an all-over on the pieced quilt, which was rectangles of neutral tones, then she laid down her applique pieces (fused to a very lightweight fusible) and stitched around them, then clipped the edges. Here's her blog showing the quilt and explaining the process - and I took the picture!

    Thankyou Dunster for the link to Jean Daniels site..I have bookmarked it as it looks very interesting and will go back and look at more of her work,
    True friends are like diamonds
    They are precious and rare.

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