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Thread: Is there something really wrong with my quilt???

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by cindyb View Post
    What a beautiful way to make a memory quilt with many different fabrics.
    Thank you, Cindy, you warm my heart with your comment.

  2. #27
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    I feel sorry for you. It is tough to win when dealing with customer satisfaction long distance. And the longer the problem lingers, the more of a negative effect it has on you. If this happened to me, I think I would offer the customer her money back, take whatever you have learned from the incident, and be done with it.

    Also, wanted to let you know that the pattern you chose, although very difficult with those curved points, makes a very nice looking design!

  3. #28
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    I think the shop really should have included explanations with the photos, so you knew exactly what they were thinking. It may be that talking to them now won't help, as it won't be fresh in their minds and they don't have the photos in front of them. You can't really reassure your customer, since you didn't get an explanation of what they thought had to be addressed to keep the quilt from falling apart (that sounds as though it might be an exaggeration). Sorry you're in such a tough situation!
    Lisa

  4. #29
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    Personally, I think the quilt shop sounds very unprofessional. The comment about the quilt "falling apart" is ridiculous. I have made quilts by hand sewing everything and those quilts have been drug all over the world by my great nieces and they have not fallen apart - one is 5 years old and one is 7 years old.

    i would think your machine sewing would hold up better than my hand sewing for sure.

    the quilts that I make are far from perfect, but they hold up.

    too bad because I don't know how you would reassure your customer

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by meyert View Post
    Personally, I think the quilt shop sounds very unprofessional. The comment about the quilt "falling apart" is ridiculous. I have made quilts by hand sewing everything and those quilts have been drug all over the world by my great nieces and they have not fallen apart - one is 5 years old and one is 7 years old.

    i would think your machine sewing would hold up better than my hand sewing for sure.

    the quilts that I make are far from perfect, but they hold up.

    too bad because I don't know how you would reassure your customer
    Well, that's exactly my first thought; if my grandmother not so good hand quilting hold up for 60 years, why not a machine stitching, even imperfect?
    Now, I've explained this to my customer, offered her to ship back the quilt. I can't do nothing more. It's her decision. Thanks for you comment!

  6. #31
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    The only problem I see is maybe the thread isn't the best quality. I would ask for the customer to return the quilt at your expense and then remove every loose thread, bury the tails and take out the double back up stitches at the miter. A more experienced machine quilter will see every flaw in another's work but the shop's evaluation was uncalled for. The quilt won't fall apart. I am afraid you lost money on this one to make it right.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe'smom View Post
    I think the shop really should have included explanations with the photos, so you knew exactly what they were thinking. It may be that talking to them now won't help, as it won't be fresh in their minds and they don't have the photos in front of them. You can't really reassure your customer, since you didn't get an explanation of what they thought had to be addressed to keep the quilt from falling apart (that sounds as though it might be an exaggeration). Sorry you're in such a tough situation!
    The customer have forwarded me the shop explanations with the pictures. They found 8 issues. 6 of them are pureley aesthetic. 2 are minor issues that would be easily fixed. But I understand they are proposing to unstitch ALL the quilt, and re-quilt it. This is highly ridiculous. It would risk ruining the quilt!!!
    Last edited by profannie; 06-29-2018 at 04:15 PM.

  8. #33
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    Now that is a really pretty quilt. I've been thinking that maybe that quilt shop person may have said what she did because she wanted your customers business. Otherwise perhaps she is just too outspoken, like quilt police?
    I do hope you work it all out and your customer is happy. Good luck.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daylesewblessed View Post
    I feel sorry for you. It is tough to win when dealing with customer satisfaction long distance. And the longer the problem lingers, the more of a negative effect it has on you. If this happened to me, I think I would offer the customer her money back, take whatever you have learned from the incident, and be done with it.

    Also, wanted to let you know that the pattern you chose, although very difficult with those curved points, makes a very nice looking design!
    I was a bit tempted to do this, because it's truly bothering and time consuming. But then I thought it would look like the quilt is really defective, that I somehow admit to have made a quilt with no value, and the customer might ruin it for good if the quilt shop unpick all the stitches to quilt it again.

    Thanks for your kind words. I also very much like this quilt, so this is a heartbroken situation.
    Last edited by profannie; 06-29-2018 at 04:17 PM.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
    Now that is a really pretty quilt. I've been thinking that maybe that quilt shop person may have said what she did because she wanted your customers business. Otherwise perhaps she is just too outspoken, like quilt police?
    I do hope you work it all out and your customer is happy. Good luck.
    I'm also thinking, since she is offering longarm service, that she is looking for some job to do.

  11. #36
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    This is exactly why I will not quilt for money.

    I have lots of fabrics and scraps I want to use up, so I make donation quilts. I have given away a whole bunch of quilts. I pick the pattern the colors and FMQ. I figure no one can gripe about a free quilt. At least not to my face.

    When the Lady finds out how much they will charge her for quilting, she will be shocked. That was very unprofessional of she/they to do that.
    Another Phyllis
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  12. #37
    Super Member givio's Avatar
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    I would kindly say to the customer that since she spoke with the quilt shop she should be able to indicate where the quilt is falling apart, would she please put a safety pin on these areas so you can repair them, that you would reimburse her for her postage to send the quilt back to you, and you would pay for the postage to return the finished quilt to her. If she is unwilling to admit where the quilt is falling apart and unwilling to have you to repair your work, then apparently she is willing to keep it and deal with it herself. I would indicate a time frame in which you will expect the quilt to be delivered back to you, and conclude by saying if you have not received it by that time, then you will consider that she is happy with the quilt, as she had initially indicated to you at first she was happy with it. I would say these things in writing, and keep a copy of what you offered to do in order to make the situation right, and send your offer to her by registered mail, with a signed receipt requested, so you will have proof of what you offered, the time frame involved, and proof that she received your offer.

    If she sends you the quilt to repair, I'd photograph every area that has a safety pin, and I'd go over the whole quilt extremely carefully as to the construction of it, and I would get a written statement from someone who is qualified to say that it is a normal quilt with normal construction, keep a copy of of that statement, and include the original statement with the repaired quilt when sending the quilt back to the customer, and include a friendly thank you note for her business.

    If she doesn't send the quilt in the allotted time, try to move forward, learn from it, forget it.
    Last edited by givio; 06-29-2018 at 05:10 PM.

  13. #38
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    I love the pattern, what a great way to display your memory clothes!

  14. #39
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    That's actually a very pretty quilt, using a difficult design.

  15. #40
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    your quilt is stunning. For someone who has only been quilting for 5 years, I think you did a great job of making that quilt. Unfortunately, once your customer saw some of those thread tails.....she turned her attention into fine detail and looking for every imperfection she could find. I'm sorry you have to deal with this, but all the experienced ladies on this board seem to have provided great guidance. It's a great learning experience for us all (even the binding thing by sewing the corners), but also an inspiration for me....what's that pattern? Looks beautiful, but hard.

  16. #41
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    In my opinion: For the sake of your reputation your only recourse is to pay for the quilt to be sent back to you and for you to fix it to the best of your ability to satisfy your customer. The customer is always "right" when you provide them a service and charge for it. This is what happens when you run a business of making custom quilts for others. Hopefully you can learn from this experience and move forward. Good luck!

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoraB View Post
    your quilt is stunning. For someone who has only been quilting for 5 years, I think you did a great job of making that quilt. Unfortunately, once your customer saw some of those thread tails.....she turned her attention into fine detail and looking for every imperfection she could find. I'm sorry you have to deal with this, but all the experienced ladies on this board seem to have provided great guidance. It's a great learning experience for us all (even the binding thing by sewing the corners), but also an inspiration for me....what's that pattern? Looks beautiful, but hard.
    Thanks for your comment. I used the "Robbing Peter to pay Paul" block to create the central panel. It's hard because it's curved piecing, but once you get the hang of it, it's not that hard. First time I made a baby quilt with this block, it took me months :-) Now I can finish a small one in a day or two. This is really the kind of pattern you have to make over and over again to get good at. I must have made more than 30 quilts with this block, so it's an old friend.

  18. #43
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    The only problem I see is maybe the thread isn't the best quality.
    I was wondering the same thing, which is why I asked what kind of thread. Maybe it was old?

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    I was wondering the same thing, which is why I asked what kind of thread. Maybe it was old?
    Not at all, brand new Aurifil for piecing and Essential pro for quilting. But the quilt have been washed before being sent to the customer, and I noticed that the initial wash always make a lot of threads coming out.

  20. #45
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    The pattern is really nice, I wish my points came out so well when piecing. For future reference the next time you do this pattern you might stitch in the ditch that really helps stabilize the top. I agree with other posts also in that it was very poor taste for the quilt shop to say what they did or maybe that is just how the customer interpreted it. Hope it is resolved to everyone’s satisfaction because it really is a pretty quilt.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by profannie View Post
    Not at all, brand new Aurifil for piecing and Essential pro for quilting. But the quilt have been washed before being sent to the customer, and I noticed that the initial wash always make a lot of threads coming out.
    I have never had threads come out after I have washed a quilt.

  22. #47
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
    Now that is a really pretty quilt. I've been thinking that maybe that quilt shop person may have said what she did because she wanted your customers business. Otherwise perhaps she is just too outspoken, like quilt police?
    I do hope you work it all out and your customer is happy. Good luck.
    This is what came to my mind.
    Anna Quilts

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by givio View Post
    I would kindly say to the customer that since she spoke with the quilt shop she should be able to indicate where the quilt is falling apart, would she please put a safety pin on these areas so you can repair them, that you would reimburse her for her postage to send the quilt back to you, and you would pay for the postage to return the finished quilt to her. If she is unwilling to admit where the quilt is falling apart and unwilling to have you to repair your work, then apparently she is willing to keep it and deal with it herself. I would indicate a time frame in which you will expect the quilt to be delivered back to you, and conclude by saying if you have not received it by that time, then you will consider that she is happy with the quilt, as she had initially indicated to you at first she was happy with it. I would say these things in writing, and keep a copy of what you offered to do in order to make the situation right, and send your offer to her by registered mail, with a signed receipt requested, so you will have proof of what you offered, the time frame involved, and proof that she received your offer.

    If she sends you the quilt to repair, I'd photograph every area that has a safety pin, and I'd go over the whole quilt extremely carefully as to the construction of it, and I would get a written statement from someone who is qualified to say that it is a normal quilt with normal construction, keep a copy of of that statement, and include the original statement with the repaired quilt when sending the quilt back to the customer, and include a friendly thank you note for her business.

    If she doesn't send the quilt in the allotted time, try to move forward, learn from it, forget it.
    Excellent advice. Make the offers, put it in writing, get it done if customer is willing and put it behind you. I’m sorry this happened to you. Hopefully you can move on soon.

  24. #49
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    Love the design you used for this project. Perfect for a memory quilt. Of all the comments here, the one I most agree with is that I suspicion that the quilt shop does this kind of work so were especially critical of your project. The picture does indicate a variation in the stitch length but as much stitching as is on this it surely won't be falling apart. I fear you have become a "victim" in this. The Quilt Police are active wherever this shop is. Some people like to stir trouble!

  25. #50
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    I love the pattern. I do not own a long arm machine and do all of my quilting for my quilts on my Bernina 930 domestic. I'm not an expert and I don't do a lot of fancy stitching so I don't feel I can make any comments on the quilting portion. I am currently in the process of making 2 memory quilts so to speak from western shirts for a friend of my daughter. My daughter is god mother to her 2 children. These 2 quilts are to be made from the young woman's dad's shirts (who is deceased and passed away before either of the children were born), and are from different fabrics, but no knits thank goodness. I am still in the process of taking all of the shirts apart to have enough fabric to work with, this is a chore in itself- a least 20 + shirts. The young woman doesn't sew at all and sent some garments to be used that I feel are unsuitable because of the fabric like 2 pair of jeans she sent. I have told her early on, that some of the garments were unsuitable. I will work with what I can use. I haven't told her yet, but I only plan to charge her for the batting that I use. She has MS and is wheelchair bound and having a lot of medical expenses. Basically I am doing this as a favor. I don't quilt for the public.
    To begin with I don't like the idea of making quilts from clothing that someone once wore I used new fabric and pictures of my children from infancy to adulthood for their memory quilts.
    I do agree with you about the quilt shop and perhaps they are wanting to do her quilting in the future. I'm wondering why she took the quilt to the shop to begin with before consulting you first if she had a problem or questions about the finished quilt. Good luck with this problem.
    Last edited by Gerbie; 06-30-2018 at 03:29 AM.

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