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Thread: Is there tear away paper patterns for long arms?

  1. #1
    Senior Member lbaillie's Avatar
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    Is there tear away paper patterns for long arms?

    Just recently purchased a Qunique 14R long arm. I don't have a laser yet but want to try quilting a pattern edge to edge. What are my options? is there "paper patterns" to place on top of the actual quilt and then tear away?
    God should have given me grandchildren 1st!!http://signatures.mylivesignature.co...335C69E4FE.png

  2. #2
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Yes, there are. I've never used them (or any pantographs for that matter) but did a google search for tear away pantographs. This is one of the findings - https://www.quiltingcreations.com/st...CategoryID=213

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    They are out there, but that would get really pricey and only a single use product. I haven't looked lately, but Hobby Lobby carried the Carol Doak Foundation Piecing paper in bulk sheets. As long as you are using only a 10" wide panto, you can copy each section and tape them together. It would take a lot of copying for even a medium quilt. I would try to figure out a way to tape or pin the panto up in front of the machine and do the best you could at copying it freehand.

    Find a design you like and draw it a bunch of times to get your muscle memory started. Then use it as a guide. Or break down and go ahead and buy the laser. I have heard that some people taped one of those red laser flashlight style lights to the back of their machines to use as a temporary solution to getting one that would be permanent.
    Sew a Little, Love a Lot & Live like you were dying!

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    Senior Member lbaillie's Avatar
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    Thank you very much
    God should have given me grandchildren 1st!!http://signatures.mylivesignature.co...335C69E4FE.png

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    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Actually, if you go really old school you can use a super large knitting needle. Clamp it somewhere to the back of your machine, get a regular panto and follow the design with the point of the knitting needle. I'm talking those big ones that are as big around as a sharpy marker and 12" long. You have to make sure it is good and secure and the tip just hovers over the paper design. My Innova came with one and when my laser light went in the middle of a quilt, I was able to finish it with the knitting needle pointer.
    But really, if you just got your machine, load up some junk fabric or even a couple of old sheets with some batting and just have fun! It is amazing what you find you are capable of. Doodle, sign you name, do loops and squiggles and make leaf shapes. Have a blast, Much more fun at the front of the machine.
    I don't think I tried a panto until about my 10th quilt. I found it quick and most of them are very pretty and add great texture but doing them was mind numbingly boring for me. LOL

  6. #6
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I recommend a roll of ( Golden Paper) then you can copy ant pantograph onto the paper and use it to stitch through. It is a much more economical choice, Golden is easy to see through, easy to copy/ trace. There is a lot of paper on a roll ( check Nancy’s Notions) easy to sew through and you can trace or create your own designs. You can also cut the paper - make the design any size you need.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  7. #7
    Super Member QuiltingVagabond's Avatar
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    I lucked out when I found a 18" roll of Golden Threads paper at a thrift store for $1. Works great and tears away nicely.
    QuiltingVagabond aka Kathy

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    I had not heard of Golden Paper before. Would it work for spider web string quilts?

  9. #9
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
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    Personally if it were me I would make a copy of the tear away that you choose and this way once you buy a laser you can use it on the frame bed. I mean you purchased it so wouldn't that be okay? Not trying to encourage something that is wrong to do.
    Maria
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  10. #10
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    feline fanatic......I was the one who originally went old school with the knitting needle stylus and posted it on the Quilting Board. This can be found under "HOMEMADE PANTOGRAPH STYLUS" by lindaschipper.
    Been using this for some months now and it still works for me and a few others who have tried it.

  11. #11
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindaschipper View Post
    feline fanatic......I was the one who originally went old school with the knitting needle stylus and posted it on the Quilting Board. This can be found under "HOMEMADE PANTOGRAPH STYLUS" by lindaschipper.
    Been using this for some months now and it still works for me and a few others who have tried it.
    Too funny, I never saw your post and I had to resort to the knitting needle way back in 2011, long before you ever posted it. I had always wondered why they included that huge knitting needle with my machine. When my light went on me, Michael from Innova told me that is how all the longarmers followed pantos before laser lights were common and that is why they used to include one with every machine, it was a real life saver for me as I was in the middle of a customer quilt and needed to finish it. I was so thankful I didn't have to drop everything to run to Walmart to buy one. Clever Innova engineered the laser light holder to easily hold the needle with nothing else. As a result I had mounted mine at an angle not straight up and down like you pictured in your tute. My laser light is mounted the same way, at an angle, not straight up and down.

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    I've purchased rolls of patterns for applying to quilt top and quilting over it. What a pain, trying to get all the paper bits picked off the quilt! Now, I just roll the pattern out on the other side of the machine (where a wood or plastic pattern would go for use with a stylus). I use the laser light for guidance. When done, I roll the pattern back up and store it for another time.

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    I’ve used a panto, but haven’t figured out an easy way to line up the next row without it looking like rows instead of an all over design. Any suggestions?

  14. #14
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janice1120 View Post
    I’ve used a panto, but haven’t figured out an easy way to line up the next row without it looking like rows instead of an all over design. Any suggestions?
    Buy the kinds of pantos where they have the partial design printed on top and bottom so you can line up using the partial and then the panto design will "nest". Notice on this panto http://www.willowleafstudio.com/time...paper-version/ The bits of the design that show in blue are the partial pattern. When I advance I line up my previously quilted row to the partial design and start my new row on the full design that is printed in black. I once ordered a panto that didn't have the partial design printed and could not figure out how to make it nest.

  15. #15
    Junior Member Kaye's Avatar
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    I own the sister to your machine, the Block Rockit. I used pantos a lot when I first started but have found many edge to edge designs that I can just FMQ much faster. Check out Angela Walters video on her swirls and paisley designs. I have also pounced template designs to sew over on the quilt.

    Be sure to join the Facebook page for Q'nique owners. PM me with any questions. I'd be happy to talk with you over the phone. I love my machine and am so happy that I bought it two years ago!
    Sew much to do in sew little time!

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    Sorry if this is considered a "bump" I'm new here and have been reading back a few pages. I have some vision issues and I regularly use parchment paper (for baking) that I get at the dollar store for machine quilting and it is strong enough to hold up (better than tissue paper) but still easy to tear. It's 12" by 25' roll, pretty sweet for a buck! I mostly make bed sized quilts so is usually 1+ rolls for me, still a bargain. I use my friend's quilting machine/frame (pfaff P3 power quilter -- no computer/grace frame), she does not have the back handles and so I can't just use a pantograph but I can copy the design from a bought design on to the parchment paper pretty easily. Or at least much easier than I can see the lines marked on the top. I want to do fancier designs that what I can do with my basic vision and I am not (yet!) a gifted freehand quilter although I can do basic stipples with stars, flowers, hearts, etc. So when I have to spend the time to copy what I want, I consider it well worth it. I have found that you really don't want to go off the sides of the paper, too often it will scrunch up and get caught in the foot, so it's best to try and keep the designs within the 12" of the paper. Be warned that tearing off the paper is messy (the little pieces float about everywhere) and sometimes can be difficult to get it all off, usually rubbing with a fingernail will get off the spare chads.

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