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Thread: for those of you that paper piece..

  1. #26
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    I'm with the others. I use cheap copy paper, very small stitches and an #80 needle. I've been paper piecing for years and love it. With the smaller stitches, I just hope I don't have to unsew. Check twice before you sew.

  2. #27

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    I had the same problem with getting blocks onto Muslin. I ironed the Muslin onto freezer paper, then ran it through the printer. It had to be no larger than 8and 1/2x11" since that is it for home printers. Or, you could take it to a print place for larger size.
    If you do it this way, make it longer than needed, as there is a time in the copying for it to grasp the paper. I did some experimenting and it worked for me.
    Let me know if it works.
    [email protected]

  3. #28
    Junior Member sheliab12's Avatar
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    I found the best way is to scan pattern into computer and print out. Make sure the size is correct b4 you do al of them. the Tablet paper that they sell at Wal mart or anywhere they sell school supplies, is very good. It looks like the paper we use to us to practice printing on with the 3 big lines but is has no lines. It is only $2.00 and that is for a whole tablet. Tear if off and feed it into your printer. When you are done the paper is very easy to tear away. Hope this helps. Shelia

  4. #29

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    First of all I have never used freezer paper for paper piecing as it is too heavy and stiff and I can think of no advantage to using it. The thinner your paper is the better. Tissue paper is good but hard to use in a printer for copies. Cheap news print works fairly well and squares of "sandwich wrap" are great if your printer cooperates and you cut it to the right size. It is available at Smart and Final stores or restaurant supply stores, otherwise I use the cheapest light weight copy paper I can find.
    The only use I find for freezer paper for quilting is to iron white muslin to it for photo copies in your printer or using double thickness fused together for applique. :)

  5. #30
    Senior Member Belles.hold's Avatar
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    Well, you certainly received a lot of suggestions for a foundation for paper piecing. When I was teaching paper piecing I used vellium that I purchased from a neighborhood printer and after running the pattern through my printer, distributed a few sheets to the students. Vellium is easy to see through and you can remove it from the block easily. For personal use I use newspaper paper, purchased at an office supply store. Newspaper paper is thinner than vellium, but after cuting down to 8.5" x 11", it goes through the printer beautifully and is removed from the block quickly. For a complex block (New York Beauty or Mariner's Compass), I use non-fusible interfacing that remains in the quilt. You can also purchase Carol Doak's paper at Joann's (and use the 40% off coupon because it's a little pricy). Good luck with whatever you decide on.

  6. #31
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    It's been a long while since I did any paper piecing. I'm a bit uncoordinated and have a heckuva time getting all the pieces right side up, etc., etc. Before my one attempt into the paper piecing world, I bought paper specifically designed for paper piecing (from Nancy's Notions catalog, I think). Anyway, if I recall correctly, I only drew the pattern once, then, following along the drawn lines, I sewed through several paper thicknesses (old needle -- no thread) on my sewing machine so that I could use the needle perforations for several blocks instead of having to draw the lines repeatedly. Hope I'm making myself clear ... I've learned that just because I know what I'm talking about does not mean that anyone else does.

  7. #32

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    Wow, thats what I love about this site, ask one question and get many different answers!!! It seems there are many techniques out there and we each have a personal preference.What I ended up doing was sewing through several sheets of paper with an old needle and no thread and that worked for me and I understood you perfectly weezie! I wont be buying the vellum or printers paper anytime soon, only because since I got laid off I have to really watch my pennies...but once I am able to I will try it. :D

  8. #33
    Super Member quilter1962's Avatar
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    I have only ever used photocopier paper - LOL listen to this - I do have some of Carol Doaks paper also but I always forget to use it. I seem to be having lots of special moments coming my way these days. What am I like. :lol:

    Tisha

  9. #34
    conblond2005's Avatar
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    I would rather paper piece with regular copy paper. I've done the freezer paper copies too. It's easy to tear off if you just run a large pin down the seams before you tear them off. I've never tried copies of the freezer paper on my printer. I just drew them out with a maker. It was supposed to be for a class and she wanted us to have 3 copies. It's for the fan dance quilt I've been working on. The teacher wanted us to learn to fold the paper back and sew just off the edge of the paper so there wouldn't be anything you had to tear. Of course it was during a snow storm and we couldn't go and paid the $45 for the book and copies. No refunds were offered. Boo Hoo

  10. #35
    Junior Member himom122's Avatar
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    thy copying only one then staple several sheets together. Then you take it to your sewing machine and sew the pattern with no thread. Do this enough to make your eighty copies.

  11. #36
    conblond2005's Avatar
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    I didn't have a light box but put one together using my sewing machine lamp and used a plastic tote. Worked so great I won't ever need to buy a box.

  12. #37
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    I use paper called UV/ULTRAII translucent printing paper. It says it's 8.5 M weight. Staples printed the paper piecing pattern

  13. #38
    conblond2005's Avatar
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    himom122

    That is a really great idea to use. Thanks

  14. #39
    Quiltin'Lady's Avatar
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    Most of the time I paper piece using very lightweight interfacing (with the pattern traced on) that I just leave in place. This works great for wall hangings or hotpads, etc. Not to good for baby quilts or things that will be handled a lot (it makes it too stiff, IMO).

    One thing that I've just learned in the worst way possible is NOT to use a ballpoint pen to trace the pattern (what what I thinking??). Not only can you see it from the front, but it has a way of bleeding onto the fabric even after it's been 'removed' -- and no amount of soaking, hairspray, etc, etc, will get it all out.

    I've just thrown out a lovely quilt because of this. Completely stupid on my part, for sure. :cry:


  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quiltin'Lady
    Most of the time I paper piece using very lightweight interfacing (with the pattern traced on) that I just leave in place. This works great for wall hangings or hotpads, etc. Not to good for baby quilts or things that will be handled a lot (it makes it too stiff, IMO).

    One thing that I've just learned in the worst way possible is NOT to use a ballpoint pen to trace the pattern (what what I thinking??). Not only can you see it from the front, but it has a way of bleeding onto the fabric even after it's been 'removed' -- and no amount of soaking, hairspray, etc, etc, will get it all out.

    I've just thrown out a lovely quilt because of this. Completely stupid on my part, for sure. :cry:
    Well, now you know not to - thanks for sharing -

  16. #41
    Super Member SaraSewing's Avatar
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    weezie, that's a great idea!

  17. #42

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    I use 16 pound typing paper. You can usually find it at an office supply store. It works very well in a copier so you don't have to trace your pattern. Also, it is very easy to remove.

  18. #43
    Member elkridgequilter's Avatar
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    I use the Carol Doak paper or cheap printer paper and print my foundations on my printer. I have great luck tearing both away. Recently I was out of state for an extended period because my son was in an accident and hospitalized. I ran out of handwork. I went to the local quilt shop and bought a couple of kits. They were paper piecing but I had no sewing machine in the ICU. I hand pieced the paper pieced blocks. I found water soluble foundation paper at the same quilt shop. I worked very well since I did not have to pull on my delicate hand stitches to get rid of my foundation paper. (Fortunately my son is now fine :-) ).

  19. #44
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by azam
    Try newsprint paper, you can purchase it at a school supply. I'm not sure if they carry it at an office supply store. I suppose you can call and find out. Hope this helps!!!
    For my classroom, I used to get roll ends of newprint at the local newpaper office. They gave it to schools, and perhaps charged a minimal fee to others.

  20. #45
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    Quote Originally Posted by loves2quilt
    now Im tracing that pattern onto freezer paper...very tedious...there are 4 blocks to make one block, and you need 20 blocks, so I need to trace that template..80 times!!
    Why don't you get the freezer paper in 8.5x11 sheets and run it through the printer? I would either create a template page on a computer paint type/graphics program or print the pattern off an existing pattern file (pdf).
    Freezer paper in 8.5 X 11 inch sheets? Where to you find that??

  21. #46
    Junior Member judyjo's Avatar
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    I print the patterns on regular printer paper. I don't have a scanner. I'm usually printing the patterns from one of many sites I've found that offer free patterns.

    judyjo

  22. #47
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    you can buy letter size freezer paper online at a couple of online quilt shops or your LQS might carry it

  23. #48
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kluedesigns
    you can buy letter size freezer paper online at a couple of online quilt shops or your LQS might carry it
    Thanks, Sweetie.

  24. #49
    Member Nikki's Avatar
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    i found vellum papera at the office supply store the other day in a pack of 50 sheets for cheaper than my quilt store can sell 20. was looking for the cheap copy paper but no luch. the vellum was $13, thought that was reasonable.

  25. #50
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    I am new to paper piecing and tried J Tailor sheets. They are supposed to work with copiers and printers, but I have had no luck with copiers or printers. Does anyone have any ideas to get it to work?

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