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Thread: for those of you that paper piece..

  1. #1

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    what kind of paper do you use? I was taught to use freezer paper and find thats the only way I can do it now. I found a pattern and printed out the template on regular paper and now Im tracing that pattern onto freezer paper...very tedious...there are 4 blocks to make one block, and you need 20 blocks, so I need to trace that template..80 times!!! It is taking me forever..is there a better way to do this? I also got a brainstorm..figured Id just print it onto freezer paper...well, my copier didnt like that, chewed up the paper and broke off a little roller...now nothing will print...geez..I think I can fix it with super glue, keeping my fingers crossed. So if you have a better way to do this without all the tracing Id love to hear it, cause Im stumped!!

  2. #2
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    if i'm going to take out the foundation i use velum if its staying in to add support to the fabrics i use interfacing.

  3. #3
    Super Member azam's Avatar
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    Try newsprint paper, you can purchase it at a school supply. I'm not sure if they carry it at an office supply store. I suppose you can call and find out. Hope this helps!!!

  4. #4
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Kids scribble/drawing pads that have the tanish color paper works great. It prints fine in an ink jet printer. I find I have to trim 1/2 off the width but I do a stack at a time. I like the pads sold at Staples called Kids Scribble pad, three pads to a package.

    One thing you could do is sew the outline of the pattern through several layers of freezer paper using no thread and a used needlle. Deli sandwich paper works good for sewing through.


  5. #5
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by loves2quilt
    now Im tracing that pattern onto freezer paper...very tedious...there are 4 blocks to make one block, and you need 20 blocks, so I need to trace that template..80 times!!
    Why don't you get the freezer paper in 8.5x11 sheets and run it through the printer? I would either create a template page on a computer paint type/graphics program or print the pattern off an existing pattern file (pdf).

  6. #6
    Super Member SaraSewing's Avatar
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    I just buy cheap copy paper. Run it through a regular copier. It works fine.

  7. #7
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    I actually buy paper sheets sold by Carol Doak who is the queen of foundation paper pcing. It goes thru my printer without a problem and is lighter weight. Easy to sew thru. Marge

  8. #8
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saravincent
    I just buy cheap copy paper. Run it through a regular copier. It works fine.
    This is what I use too. When I am ready to remove it I fold it first and sometimes run my finger along the fold and then open it back up and then it tears off very neatly. I very rarely need to pick out any little paper pieces. I do sometimes use news print, I bought a end roll of it from my local newspaper for little of nothing and it is handy for making bigger blocks :wink:

  9. #9
    Super Member mimisharon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saravincent
    I just buy cheap copy paper. Run it through a regular copier. It works fine.
    Me, too, I try to find the recycled copy paper, it tears away easier and it's a cinch to copy onto sew onto. I haven't used freezer paper since the first paper piecing I tried on my own. It's to heavy for pp. I only use it for templates now.

  10. #10
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    I'm with the cheap copy paper users...it works for me without any problems.

  11. #11
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    I just use regular cheap copy paper, if you could find the eraser typing paper it would probably be even better, but good luck in finding that. I'm not sure I'll ever get done with the WIP that I'm doing in oriental type fabrics. I just figured out how many I would need-225-WOW. Maybe I'll just make my Japanese friend a wall hanging.LOL

  12. #12
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    For simple squares, I used graph paper, and just cut on the lines. I am making a postage stamp quilt this way, with the squares 2cms x 2cms, and couldn't contemplate tracing.

  13. #13
    Cookn's Avatar
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    I use Carol Doaks paper also. You'll find that if you decrease your stitch length and use a 90/14 needles your foundations will tear easier.

  14. #14
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    paper foundation piecing

    I had this great idea to sew down the edges 1/8 inch from the edge to keep the pieces from flopping around. Not a good idea. A real challenge to remove it after piecing the individual squares.

    I have learned so much the hard way. Seemed like such a good idea at the time.javascript:emoticon(':?');

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lacelady
    For simple squares, I used graph paper, and just cut on the lines. I am making a postage stamp quilt this way, with the squares 2cms x 2cms, and couldn't contemplate tracing.
    what a great idea!

  16. #16
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    Thank you Klue - I meant that I am using mine the English Paper piecing way, but perhaps I didn't read the question right, as most people seem to be thinking along the foundation line?

  17. #17
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    thats so true - foundation piecing has taken over the term paper piecing and English paper piecing has to have the English in front of it.

    do you do all your work by hand? maybe thats why the 2 paper piecing styles are used - one is for hand piecing and the other is by machine.

  18. #18
    Super Member Shemjo's Avatar
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    English pp -freezer paper works best for me. I can run it through my printer if I cut it slightly smaller than regular paper. The leading edge HAS to be straight across. :?

  19. #19
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    american paper piecing i use newsprint. i used to buy carol doakes but i don't find it any better.

    if you use a lightbox, you should be able to use almost anything.

  20. #20
    Senior Member judee0624's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimisharon
    Quote Originally Posted by saravincent
    I just buy cheap copy paper. Run it through a regular copier. It works fine.
    Me, too, I try to find the recycled copy paper, it tears away easier and it's a cinch to copy onto sew onto. I haven't used freezer paper since the first paper piecing I tried on my own. It's to heavy for pp. I only use it for templates now.
    Me three, though I have been using a very pricey template paper by Pearl Pereira Designs. I also tried some thin paper by That Patchwork Place but my printer literally chewed it up. It was kind of like drawing paper also mentioned by someone here. Now I just use the regular copy paper. Works fine.
    judee

  21. #21

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    Carol Doak's is the way togo. Reasonably priced too

  22. #22
    Senior Member motomom's Avatar
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    I've been using cheap crappy copier paper. The cheapest I could find. It held up fine, worked in my printer fine, and with one fold at the seam line, tore off like a dream. No problems!

  23. #23
    Senior Member judee0624's Avatar
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    Where do you get Carol Doak's paper?

    judee

  24. #24
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    I used tracing paper I got at Staples, but you have to trim it so it fits in the printer. I liked it because I'm new at it and I could see through a little. But its a little pricey. Cheapy printer paper would work too!!

  25. #25
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    All my English paper pieceing I do by hand, mostly with my feet up, in front of the TV, but also when travelling. The hand work comes into its own when I am too tired to sit at the machine.

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