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Thread: For those of you that sell...

  1. #1
    Super Member quiltingfan's Avatar
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    Hi I was wondering for those of you that sell your quilts, How do you price them? I need a little bit of extra cash and instead of getting a job my husband told me to do what I like to do and know how to do and that is making quilts. So I was thinking of making some and selling them, and I already have 1 person that wants me to make their son a quilt, but what to charge? The one that I am making for a friend she is buying the materials, but what about the others? I am so glad that we have this site, would be lost without it. Thanks Beth

  2. #2
    Super Member LoisN's Avatar
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    I have never sold one, so I really don't know what I'm talking about.....so I read something online about pricing quilts. The suggestion was to keep track of your expenses and your time. Add up the expenses for the fabric, thread, batting, backing, etc. and then allow $10 per hour for your time. Just a thought.

  3. #3
    Super Member quiltingfan's Avatar
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    Thanks, that will help me get started. I have a hard time tracking my time because so much is a seem here then get up and switch the laundry. Sew some more and do dinner... Guess I will keep track if I am planning on selling it.

  4. #4
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    I have no experience with this so cannot advise. I have heard that you cannot re-coup your time invested because no one or very few, could afford to pay. Set an amount you would pay, add 20%, and see what happens.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Rachel's Avatar
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    I've only sold one quilt and a friend suggested keeping track of my time too, but that was just to difficult. I've decided that if I sell another one, I'll at least double the cost of the materials (batting, thread, everything) and charge that for labor.

  6. #6

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    I sell a lot of tops on ebay. I found that I get a better price for an unfinished top than a finished.

  7. #7

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    oh and block sets sell very well, especially mini block sets of about 9 to 12 blocks that are around 3 to 4 inches square.

  8. #8
    Senior Member jamh's Avatar
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    I sell alot of mine at festivals! I keep up with the cost of material(fabric, batting, thread)! Then I see if it was hard to piece, if it was hard I automatically add $50.00 to it! Then I do $10.00/hr! And $0.015 per square inch on the quilting(overall size of the quilt)!

    I hope this helps!

  9. #9
    Super Member bailey's Avatar
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    When someone inquired about buying one of my quilts I asked the guild here how much to charge. Their answer was cost of material times 3. Hope this helps.

  10. #10
    Super Member Barb_MO's Avatar
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    I have several quilts. I pretty much stick to just a few patterns so I know pretty well how much time it takes to do them.
    I find a time when I can pretty much wore a few hours without interruptions.
    Each step in making the quilt I write down how long it took.
    ironing all the fabric...say 30 min.
    Cutting................4 hrs.
    Sewing one block or one panel of a strip piece quilt.... so many hrs times how many blocks or panels. etc.

    after figuring out how much time to do the quilt, I add on a few hours for extras. $10. hrs is a fair price plus all the materials for the quilt. Haven't figured out how to charge for shopping time :-)

  11. #11
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    Good post. I am interested in the responses. I have never sold one, I felt no one would pay what I thought it was worth. I may try one day and see what happens.

  12. #12
    Super Member quilterguy27's Avatar
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    Interesting thread. I will be watching this one because I get asked to make quilts for people all the time. I recently told a friend I would be happy to make her one, but I wouldn't charge her. I'm making it out of misc. blocks, jar blocks & sq in a sq w/ butterflies that I already had made. I let her pick out the sashing and borders from my stash. It's a lapsize quilt. Guess I can't go back and ask for money now, but for the future I would like to know. Thanks!!

  13. #13
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    I made one for a co-worker (queen size)she bought all the materials and Paid me $130.00. I hand quilted it, It really was worth more but it was all she could afford. I made one for a friend who gladly paid me yea $20.00 Cause she could get one at Walmart for that (King size), That was hand quilted also. I just hand quilted a top for a lady for the cancer walk, (she supplied the batting backing and binding) She gave me $70.00 but it was for a good cause so I didn't mind that one, She also cried when I gave it to her! (full size)

  14. #14
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    The price not only is determined by the time involved, but you also have to consider the detailed work. A smaller quilt, faster to make, but one of a kind, can be much more expensive than a larger one than can be easily reproduced. Also your market will determine the price. I have sold several in NYC for a lot more money that I could have gotten in northern NY. In some markets people are willing to pay what your work is worth and in others they just don't value it as much.

  15. #15
    Super Member quiltingfan's Avatar
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    Thank you for all your in put. I was also thinking about just making a list of prices for the sizes??? but then of course what if they want you to make one that is more complex? Then you are in a bind because it is worth a lot more. I like the idea of either 3x the cost of the material or just 10.00 an hour. Keep those suggestions coming. Thanks Beth

  16. #16
    Super Member quiltingfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maride
    The price not only is determined by the time involved, but you also have to consider the detailed work. A smaller quilt, faster to make, but one of a kind, can be much more expensive than a larger one than can be easily reproduced. Also your market will determine the price. I have sold several in NYC for a lot more money that I could have gotten in northern NY. In some markets people are willing to pay what your work is worth and in others they just don't value it as much.
    so true...

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingfan
    Thank you for all your in put. I was also thinking about just making a list of prices for the sizes??? but then of course what if they want you to make one that is more complex? Then you are in a bind because it is worth a lot more. I like the idea of either 3x the cost of the material or just 10.00 an hour. Keep those suggestions coming. Thanks Beth
    Great thread, thanks for posting this, quiltingfriend!

    Regarding complexity, I'm thinking you could always have a price guide with some photos of "simple" and "complex" quilts to give people an idea of base prices, and charge extra if you make a design specifically for someone.

    I'd imagine that it will be good if you can end up offering each customer a fixed price for their quilt once you've agred the details of what you will make. After a bit of practice and timekeeping, you'll have a pretty good idea of how long your work will take (and get a feel for your customers and how much they are willing and able to pay...), so you'll be able to do fixed prices.

    I've never sold quilts (yet... :) ), but have been self-employed for years. I've found that clients respond much more favorably to fixed prices than per-hour fees and estimates. So do I when I'm ordering something! I like it. I know beforehand how much I'll have to pay, it feels reliable and solid.

  18. #18
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    I have several (about 20) quilt tops. I never thought about selling them unquilted. I may give that a try because I love making the tops but have a hard time making myself quilt them. and It would just cost too much to have them quilted. Do you put a reserve price on the quilt tops or just see what people will pay?

  19. #19
    Super Member JenniePenny's Avatar
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    I've been to three annual quilting retreats with a bunch of fine quilting ladies, many of whom belong to guilds. Their advice is to charge 3x material.

    With that being said, however, I did sell a full size quilt for $500. Some ladies said I way undercharged. Others said that seemed fair because I had not hand-quilted it. Also, I sold a twin size for $150. But it all depends on your location and your customers.
    If somebody says they can buy a quilt at Wal-Mart for $20, I say I realize that, but do you want something that will still be intact 10 or more years from now? Do you want something that no one else has? Or do you want something made of inferior materials from a factory?

  20. #20
    Super Member athenagwis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JenniePenny
    I've been to three annual quilting retreats with a bunch of fine quilting ladies, many of whom belong to guilds. Their advice is to charge 3x material.

    With that being said, however, I did sell a full size quilt for $500. Some ladies said I way undercharged. Others said that seemed fair because I had not hand-quilted it. Also, I sold a twin size for $150. But it all depends on your location and your customers.
    If somebody says they can buy a quilt at Wal-Mart for $20, I say I realize that, but do you want something that will still be intact 10 or more years from now? Do you want something that no one else has? Or do you want something made of inferior materials from a factory?
    Plus if someone says that they can buy one from Wal-Mart for $20, they are not your target market. If they are already thinking that way, they will never pay what a quilt is truly worth and you should not lower your price just to get a sale. Make sure you target and market to people that have the money to spend and know what quality really is.

    Rachel

  21. #21
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    I've sold quite a few now. Doll quilts are $22-40, baby quilts are $100-125, lap quilts are $175-300, and one 82" square one for $900. That one has very narrow strips. I have lots more for sale. I pay to have lap and larger quilted. Everything is done on machine. I ask my quilter what I should sell things for-she steers me in the right direction. I'd have no clue. She feels workmanship has a lot to do with it, and how complicated the pattern is, and how small the pieces.

    99% of the time say NO if someone asks if I'll make them a quilt of their choosing for money. Only once did it happen. A student's mom said she'd never survive leaving 5th grade without a quilt from me :roll: and she was willing to pay. I had no idea what to charge, but decided $15 an hour, and said I'd only do a ragged flannel; and it wouldn't go over $300 so she had a top amount. She spent $100 on the fabric. It was a pain to keep track of the time, but it ended up being $260 or so. She gave me $300. I'd just rather have my time to work on what I choose. My time to quilt is so limited right now.

    Hope that helps a little!

  22. #22
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    i sold one for 200.00 but thats what i had in it. it was a patchwork of michael miller's fairy frost. it was nice, then i sold two to a lady at the golf course for baby shower's gifts now she ask me to make them and i gave her a choice of some i had on hand i charged her 50.00 each. i put my quilts in the general store in town, but there is no way you can provide an income unless you can put them out quickly like a day on two and have them displayed where there is a lot of traffic

    us quilters love to quilt and that reward is that someone likes what we do
    thats our payment money is extra

    mema

  23. #23
    Super Member Barb_MO's Avatar
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    You have a lot of good point here.

    I kind of price guide for my quilts you mentioned and it does help when you can tell someone they can pick out two or three design for a certain price. When I had a shop that is basically how priced my quilts.

    I knew a couple who made and sold quilts a craft fairs. They liked the type of quilts I made and bought quilt tops from me and finished them. The man would want to buy one and the woman would start figuring our how much they would have to sell them for at the craft fair. She didn't think any machine quilted quilt would sell over the price of $248.00. I saw some of my quilt tops that they bought from me selling in a store in Branson, MO for over $500.00. i decided, why not finish them myself and get $500.00.

    I was looking on Etsy last night and couldn't believe some of the prices they want for some very small quilts. Don't if they are selling or not. Highest priced one is $12,000.00!


    Quote Originally Posted by salmonsweet

    Regarding complexity, I'm thinking you could always have a price guide with some photos of "simple" and "complex" quilts to give people an idea of base prices, and charge extra if you make a design specifically for someone.

    I'd imagine that it will be good if you can end up offering each customer a fixed price for their quilt once you've agred the details of what you will make. After a bit of practice and timekeeping, you'll have a pretty good idea of how long your work will take (and get a feel for your customers and how much they are willing and able to pay...), so you'll be able to do fixed prices.

    I've never sold quilts (yet... :) ), but have been self-employed for years. I've found that clients respond much more favorably to fixed prices than per-hour fees and estimates. So do I when I'm ordering something! I like it. I know beforehand how much I'll have to pay, it feels reliable and solid.

  24. #24
    Gal
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    Very interesting thread, not that I am thinking of selling, I am a beginner, but I would be interested in what my own quilts would be worth, money wise. I agree workmanship must come into it and also perhaps original designs over the more commonly seen designs. Some quilts are master pieces both design and workmanship. Hand quilting would obviously take longer so should by rights be dearer but I have also seen some pretty hairy hand quilting! Custom made would be dearer for sure.
    Myself, I would hate to work to order, I do not think I could keep focused on a project I had not created myself or had my personal imput. I respect other quilters may feel differently about that.
    I paint and sell my work but never take on commissions because I always lose interest the moment they say,'What I want is'....)I like to be completely original and if a buyer likes my work enough to part with their money for it then that's a bonus!! I imagine quilt creations to be much the same.

    Gal

  25. #25
    Super Member ConnieF's Avatar
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    I charge 3 x's the materials. Fabric, backing , batting and threads to piece and the quilting. Plus gas, shopping time and washing and ironing the fabrics. And + minm $10 per hour. Then it also depends on the piecing.
    Some tops can be made in a day or two but the quilting may take 3 or 4 days. So just depends. And I never start till half is paid.
    ConnieF

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