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Thread: Thread Question

  1. #1
    Junior Member Aylahopper's Avatar
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    What type of thread do you use to piece your quilt top? Should you use Machine Quilt thread or is all purpose okay to use?

    Just not sure...

    Ayla

  2. #2
    Super Member TonnieLoree's Avatar
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    I use all purpose for piecing. I save the Machine Quilt thread for Machine Quilting or top stitching.

  3. #3
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    you can use any utility thread that works well in your machine- quilting thread tends to be a heavier thread than what we peice with. a good quality 40 or 50 wt thread is best for piecing. the thinner threads help the seam to lay flatter.

  4. #4
    Senior Member quilter1943's Avatar
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    I think any cotton thread is fine, whatever your machine likes is usually my rule. I always use cotton thread for piecing and quilting anything that will be washed and dried so the thread will shrink along with the fabric. If it's a wall hanging that won't be laundered, rayons and poly are great. If you look at JoAnn's, even WalMart, they have cotton threads that are great for piecing. For color, if I'm using white fabric, I use white; otherwise a muted color of the main fabric color or grey.

  5. #5
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Everyone has their personal preference. There are many threads on thread (hehehe). I PREFER all cotton, and either use Aurifil(my favorite) or will make do with Gutterman.

  6. #6
    Junior Member Aylahopper's Avatar
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    Thank You Ladies! I've been using the quilting thread but the added expence is killing me. I would rather use less expensive thread and buy more fabric :)

  7. #7
    lbaillie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    you can use any utility thread that works well in your machine- quilting thread tends to be a heavier thread than what we peice with. a good quality 40 or 50 wt thread is best for piecing. the thinner threads help the seam to lay flatter.
    I never gave this a thought, (thinner thread flatter seams)looks like I'm changing from quilting thread when I piece to the 40 or 50 wt. I love this board

  8. #8
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    I use Coats & Clark all purpose or dual duty on top and leftover pre-wound embroidery bobbins for piecing. It helps the seams lay flatter. I only use quilting thread for quilting, top stitching or fancy stitches that I want to show.

    I had some 50 weight Robison Anton machine quilting cotton thread that just flowed like oil through my quilting machine. I only bought one spool of several types of thread to try on it and it just loved that one. I've had many battles with the cotton fuzz off Coats & Clark machine quilting thread. I usually win those battles by liberally applying Sewer's Aid to the spools but decided I was tired of fighting the thread when I know there are less fuzzy threads out there.

    I've thrown a couple spools of C&C variegated thread away because the weight wasn't consistent all the way through and it gave my auto tensioning sewing machine fits. It was also very weak in the thin areas and would snap so into the trash it went after about the 6th time. It was 2 different very bright rainbow variegated spools that I really liked, too!

  9. #9
    okiepastor's Avatar
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    I quit C & C quite a long time ago after all the fuzz and slubs/flaws in the thread itself--got tired of re-threading the machines!
    Right now I am using up about 20 HUGE cones of unlabeled cotton thread from a sewing shop that quit....wish I knew who made it--it is GREAT thread.....they must be 15,000 yard cones, and most are at least half full--got them on eBay five years ago and they cost $2 cone.

  10. #10
    Super Member StitchinJoy's Avatar
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    I use regular cotton thread, Guterman or Mettler usually. I reserve machine quilting threads for quilting.

  11. #11
    Junior Member Aylahopper's Avatar
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    Can you use serger thread on a regular sewing machine?

  12. #12
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I generally use a basic, neutral color, cotton thread for my piecing. Planning to buy some of the Connecting Thread big spools next time. That said, sometimes, I simply use up whatever color I have in the bobbin, but I generally stick to cotton.

    As far as the serger thread, I believe the answer is yes - as long as the thread isn't Nylon. Nylon doesn't handle heat well.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aylahopper
    Can you use serger thread on a regular sewing machine?
    You can, but fuzz can be a problem because serger thread is made with shorter strands of cotton. It means you need to clean your machine frequently, as fuzz buildup is bad for machines.

    I switched to Aurifil 50wt for piecing and now will never go back to fuzzier threads (was using Mettler 60wt silk-finish, which is supposed to be less fuzzy than most). There is no much less lint with Aurifil!

  14. #14
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    Thread marked "Quilting", like Coats n Clark, have a coating on them to help keep them from tangling during hand stitching. This coating can gum up your machine. I use generl purpose sewing thread...and sometimes Serger cones. The thread is really strong, even though it's only 2ply in most cases.

    I have used bottom line by Superior threads, and it's nice also. Easier to get a true 1/4" seam that way.

  15. #15
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Quote Originally Posted by Aylahopper
    Can you use serger thread on a regular sewing machine?
    You can, but fuzz can be a problem because serger thread is made with shorter strands of cotton. It means you need to clean your machine frequently, as fuzz buildup is bad for machines.

    I switched to Aurifil 50wt for piecing and now will never go back to fuzzier threads (was using Mettler 60wt silk-finish, which is supposed to be less fuzzy than most). There is no much less lint with Aurifil!
    The serger thread I've seen is a poly and I have used it for piecing but I have to sit it in a jar or mug behind the machine to use it. It's too big to fit on the spindle and it occasionally jerks causing the machine to freak out so again, more trouble than it's worth.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Little RoO's Avatar
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    I am really interested in this post as I have just bought a Pfaff select 2 and it sews beautifully but I have just FMQ my first quilt...and bought King Tut on the advice of my quilt shop as being egytian cotton and excellent quality but it has broken far more than any other thread, both in the needle and bobbin...tension was fine and new needle inserted (Organ 14)...so was it the thread, machine,needle or me ?

  17. #17
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    I would use at least a 16 & possibly an 18 with King Tut. It is a good thread but thick. Also, loosen your tension a little on the top and bobbin if you're putting it in the bobbin. My Voyager came with a bunch of good Organ 16 needles but I had to put an 18 in it for King Tut. I use thinner Bottom Line or Sew Fine in the bobbin. I've also used regular piecing thread in the bobbin when I ran out of bobbin thread.

    King Tut performs wonderfully on the high speed quilting machines. I haven't tried it on a domestic machine but I don't see why it wouldn't work just as well if you do the same thing--bigger needle and looser tensions.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Little RoO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKrenning
    I would use at least a 16 & possibly an 18 with King Tut. It is a good thread but thick. Also, loosen your tension a little on the top and bobbin if you're putting it in the bobbin. My Voyager came with a bunch of good Organ 16 needles but I had to put an 18 in it for King Tut. I use thinner Bottom Line or Sew Fine in the bobbin. I've also used regular piecing thread in the bobbin when I ran out of bobbin thread.

    King Tut performs wonderfully on the high speed quilting machines. I haven't tried it on a domestic machine but I don't see why it wouldn't work just as well if you do the same thing--bigger needle and looser tensions.
    Thank you so much....really appreciate your help with this

  19. #19
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aylahopper
    Can you use serger thread on a regular sewing machine?
    I do ...shhh don't tell ! It is surprisingly strong! I have gotten just as much lint from some better brand threads.

  20. #20
    okiepastor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    Quote Originally Posted by Aylahopper
    Can you use serger thread on a regular sewing machine?
    I do ...shhh don't tell ! It is surprisingly strong! I have gotten just as much lint from some better brand threads.
    I use it too--all the time--and usually use it wound on a bobbin for the top--easier than the jerks and broken thread or robins nest! I wind off about 20 or more bobbins at a time by putting the thread into the tension then holding the cone with my fingers only inside it while winding--easy as pie!

  21. #21
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    I always use 100% cotton thread, maker doesn't matter, I buy whatever is on sale.

    I always get light, medium & dark gray, white, black & natural.

  22. #22
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    Also, if you are not buying spools at a fabric store or walmart, etc. (with those, you get all purpose, or 50 wt).... then when looking at the thread, remember the weights (wt) is backwards in a way.

    90 wt is very fine..used in bobbins for embroidery machines.

    60 wt is fine...also used in bobbins for embroidery & sewing machines. For longarm quilter's Bottom Line (a Superior thread) is used sometimes for very small stippling, and other intricate designs...to avoid thread buildup).

    50 wt is what is usually used for all purpose sewing. Coats n Clarks all purpose thread is a 50 wt, 3 ply thread.
    most serger cones are 50 wt, but are a 2 ply thread, so may look thinner, but they are very strong, and work well for piecing quilts and general sewing.

    40 wt cotton or poly thread is usually reserved for quilting or embroidery (top thread for the machine..and in embroidery, usually it's rayon or poly).

    35 wt is usually used in quilting when you want the stitching to really stand out.

    30 wt...same as above.

    Now, Tex 27...that's probably equal to 50 wt.

    If you go to http://www.superiorthreads.com you can find a lot of great information on threads. Which needle to use with which thread...tension issues, etc.

    Whatever you do, don't use quilting thread on the spools (Coats n clark, etc.) on your machine...as I mentioned earlier, it has a coating on it & will gunk up the machine over time.
    Marge

  23. #23
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okiepastor
    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    Quote Originally Posted by Aylahopper
    Can you use serger thread on a regular sewing machine?
    I do ...shhh don't tell ! It is surprisingly strong! I have gotten just as much lint from some better brand threads.
    I use it too--all the time--and usually use it wound on a bobbin for the top--easier than the jerks and broken thread or robins nest! I wind off about 20 or more bobbins at a time by putting the thread into the tension then holding the cone with my fingers only inside it while winding--easy as pie!
    I use a cone holder set off to the side and works like regular thread. I would go broke using big $$ thread. I do use Superior King tut for the quilting.

  24. #24
    Super Member glenda5253's Avatar
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    I'm bookmarking this - some great information here!

  25. #25
    Junior Member Aylahopper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenda5253
    I'm bookmarking this - some great information here!
    Yes I think I will be too. Thanks again!

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